Tag: NBA Draft Combine

Pat Riley

NBA Draft Combine going on right now in Chicago

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Right now, just about every NBA decision maker — save four, and they sent key personnel — is in Chicago for the annual NBA Draft Combine. A chance to watch guys shoot, run around cones, work out and interview guys likely to be drafted by teams.

You can watch it yourself Thursday and Friday on ESPNU (it will not be on NBA TV as in years past, not sure how the coverage will change).

Nets Assistant General Manager Bobby Marks is eating some deep-dish pizza and watching prospects this week and he broke down what the week is like for Nets.com.

Starting tonight, from 6 o’clock to 9 o’clock, we’ll interview four or five prospects. We have a half hour each with each player in an interview-type setting…We spend a half hour with each guy .

The next day, the morning is designated from 9 o’clock to 1 o’clock for workouts, so we’ll go over to the gym, we’ll watch the guys partake in a skills workout — they don’t play 5-on-5 or game setting or anything like that. It’s all general workout stuff. That afternoon, we’ll start the interviews again; I think we go from 2 in the afternoon to 9 o’clock that night. We’ll interview another eight or nine players during that seven-hour gap. The following day, which is Friday, starts it all over again: There will be drill work and skill work in the morning, from 9 til 12, and then there’s interviews from 2 o’clock to 5 o’clock.

These kind of combine workouts and measurements are not going to impact what is up for Anthony Davis, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Thomas Robinson or other guys up at the top of the food chain.

But if you’re a late first round/early second round kind of player who measures shorter than expected, is slower than expected of just come off like a turd in your interviews, it will impact you. Scouts tend to know these guys, but if the GM gets a bad vibe from you in the interview, you fall off a team’s radar fast. Again Marks.

The interview process is a good setting, just because you really don’t know much besides what you’ve done background on; you’ve never really met these kids. And you get to see the other people who are in your position, GM-wise, and get the dialogue going toward the Draft and free agency. It’s more about gathering a lot of intelligence and a lot of information.

While the media may not be in the room, word will leak out about who looked good and who did not.

Players invited to NBA Draft Combine named

NCAA Men's Championship Game - Kansas v Kentucky

Sixty guys with a dream.

The names for the NBA Draft Combine to take place in Chicago have been released. These are the guys who will be measured, weighed and in most cases put through drills to test their speed, agility and shooting. I say in most cases because, like the NFL draft combine, some of the best players will sit out some drills.

If you wonder why they won the national championship, Kentucky had more player invited than any other school with six. North Carolina has four invitations; Baylor, Vanderbilt and Syracuse have three.

As for snubs, there is Casper Ware out of Long Beach State should be on this list. DraftExpress.com has him at 57 and he was one of the best players at the mid-major level this year. I’ll admit my bias up front — I’m a Long Beach State season ticket holder and watched Ware for four years. But he’s exactly the kind of player you will fall for at Summer League — quick, good in the open court, can shoot with range if he sets he feet, is aggressive and plays hard all over the court. He’s not big (5’9”) but the guy could find a spot in the league. Not inviting him to the combine was a mistake.

Still, all the big names got the call. The invitees are below in alphabetical order.

Quincy Acy, Baylor
Harrison Barnes, North Carolina
Will Barton, Memphis
Bradley Beal, Florida
J’Covan Brown, Texas
William Buford, Ohio State
Jae Crowder, Marquette
Jared Cunningham, Oregon State
Anthony Davis, Kentucky
Marcus Denmon, Missouri
Andre Drummond, UConn
Kim English, Missouri
Festus Ezeli, Vanderbilt
Evan Fournier, France
Drew Gordon, New Mexico
Draymond Green, Michigan State
JaMychal Green, Alabama
Moe Harkless, St. John’s
John Henson, North Carolina
Tu Holloway, Xavier
Robbie Hummel, Purdue
Bernard James, Florida State
John Jenkins, Vanderbilt
Orlando Johnson, UC Santa Barbara
Darius Johnson-Odom, Marquette
Kevin Jones, West Virginia
Perry Jones III, Baylor
Terrence Jones, Kentucky
Kris Joseph, Syracuse
Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Kentucky
Doron Lamb, Kentucky
Jeremy Lamb, UConn
Meyers Leonard, Illinois
Damian Lillard, Weber State
Scott Machado, Iona
Kendall Marshall, North Carolina
Fab Melo, Syracuse
Khris Middleton, Texas A&M
Darius Miller, Kentucky
Quincy Miller, Baylor
Tony Mitchell, Alabama
Arnett Moultrie, Mississippi State
Kevin Murphy, Tennessee Tech
Andrew Nicholson, St. Bonaventure
Kyle O’Quinn, Norfolk State
Miles Plumlee, Duke
Austin Rivers, Duke
Thomas Robinson, Kansas
Terrence Ross, Washington
Mike Scott, Virginia
Henry Sims, Georgetown
Jared Sullinger, Ohio State
Jeff Taylor, Vanderbilt
Tyshawn Taylor, Kansas
Marquis Teague, Kentucky
Hollis Thompson, Georgetown
Dion Waiters, Syracuse
Royce White, Iowa State
Tony Wroten, Washington
Tyler Zeller, North Carolina

Kyrie Irving wants to play for Australia but he can’t

Hampton v Duke

As the Draft Combine was winding down in Chicago, future No.1 draft pick Kyrie Irving threw out a surprise twist, according to a tweet from Jonathan Givony of DraftExpress:

Irving said he was “strongly considering” playing for the Australian national team this summer. Australia will be trying to qualify for the 2012 Olympics

Irving owns dual citizenship so… nope, can’t do it.

Givony points out that Irving played for Team USA last summer (not in Turkey at the FIBA World Championships but in other major FIBA sanctioned events).

FIBA regulations (which mimic FIFA soccer and other international sports regulations) state that once you play for a country in an official FIBA event after your 17th birthday, you are committed to that country for the rest of your playing days. Irving was 18 when he played last summer.

Irving will be playing only for Team USA in the future when it comes to international basketball. Sorry kid, those are the rules.

NBA Draft Combine news and notes

Morehead State v Louisville

The NBA Draft Combine in Chicago is a big deal, and it isn’t.

For a guy like Kyrie Irving, him basically skipping the event other than to get measured doesn’t matter. He did have 10.2 percent body fat, pretty high for a guard, and that doesn’t matter. He will go No. 1 to Cleveland anyway. Most of the top prospects skipped out on the drills, something that will not impact their draft status if they look good in individual workouts going forward.

But for other guys father down the list, this can move them up in the draft, drop them or get them noticed at all.

After two days of reading Draft Express, watching the ESPN coverage and looking at everything else here are some notes of guys who got noticed at the combine. Follow this link to the full list of measurements from the combine.

• Enes Kanter, center, Turkey: You remember his as the guy who went to Kentucky but couldn’t play because he’d played for a professional team in Turkey at 16. Because he basically hasn’t played anywhere outside of the NIKE Hoop Summit in the last two years, scouts and GMs were watching closely. What they saw was pretty impressive athleticism, good touch, not much on the defensive end. What he did was probably work as hard or harder than any other center out there. That matters.

But there are also a report from Andy Katz of ESPN that Kanter stood up the Utah Jazz, Toronto Raptors and Milwaukee bucks for interviews. The Jazz are the team with the No. 3 pick. Interesting, and there are rumors he doesn’t want to play for them. Remember that Utah tried to chase Chris Paul around for an interview back in the day, and the fact they got sick of it was part of the reason they took Deron Williams ahead of him.

• Jeremy Tyler, center, he’s been everywhere: You may remember this story, Tyler was one of the leading prep prospects as a junior in San Diego and he skipped his senior year of high school and all of college to play overseas. Where he was almost invisible in Israel and Japan, not impressing in not very good leagues. He’s got size — 6’10” with a 7’5” wingspan — and he just looks like an NBA player. There is some real buzz about him as he showed of a respectable midrange game and worked hard at the combine. That said his skill set seems to need a lot of work and after he floundered in mediocre leagues there should be questions. Might be a good second round pick as a project, he could develop into a rotation player (but expect a year in the D-League for him).

Nikola Vucevic, center, USC: He was the tallest player at the combine, 6’11” and 3/4, plus he showed surprising skill around the basket. Big, NBA ready body. Most people think he was a second rounder going in, but big men tend to move up as the draft gets closer, don’t be shocked to see him late in the first round.

• Marshon Brooks, guard, Providence: 6’5” with a massive 7’1” wingspan, he showed some real athleticism with some big dunks and blocks. But he also seemed to have a real feel for the game and be quite smooth. That should move him up. Then again, according to Jonathan Givony at DraftExpress Brooks referred to himself in the third person during interviews, turning some teams off.

• Kenneth Faried, forward, Morehead State: This guy had the Ronny Turiaf camp — he doesn’t have a lot of skill but he does know who he is on the court and wants to out work everyone. Turiaf was a guy diving two rows into the stands for the ball at Summer League, Faried could be that kind of guy. GMs love those kind of guys. Lots of good buzz, expect him to stay in the first round.

• Jordan Williams, forward/center, Maryland: He measured just 6’9” in shoes so thinking of him as a center isn’t going to work. But, he dropped about 15 pounds since the end of the season, showing he is taking the whole thing very seriously. He’s a second rounder but it’s things like the body transformation that keep him from dropping down and out.

• Klay Thompson, guard, Washington State: The son of former No. 1 overall Mychal Thompson came into the combine thought of as one of the better shooters in the draft and he didn’t disappoint. He knocked everything down. In a draft where teams drafting from 10 to 25 are looking for guys who can help a little, being a guy who can shoot gets you noticed. Think mid first round.

Likely top pick Kyrie Irving not working out at combine

Arizona v Duke

And the NBA draft combine continues its evolution into the NFL combine. Complete with the top players not really doing anything.

Kyrie Irving, the presumptive No. 1 overall pick out of Duke, will skip all the athletic testing and drills at the NBA Combine, according to a tweet from ESPN’s Chad Ford. That combine is taking place now and for the next few days in Chicago (and can be seen on ESPNU and NBA TV).

This is new for the NBA. Guys have skipped out on the drills done on Thursday but John Wall did the Friday athletic testing, as did Blake Griffin a couple years ago. But the best players not risking their draft status and only working out in very controlled environments for teams is a staple of the NFL draft process and you’re starting to see that more and more in the NBA. As much as the agents can control that, anyway.

It’s not going to matter, in this draft Irving should go No. 1 and Cleveland wants a point guard. So it’s done, basically.

But expect the trend of top prospects skipping the drills to grow, if the NFL combine is any example.