Tag: NBA Cares

NBA cares chairs

Could lockout hurt NBA charity efforts when season does start?


The NBA really stepped up both its charitable efforts and the public relations machine promoting those efforts after the “malice at the Palace” brawl back in 2004. The league had serious image issues with many thinking that all NBA players were thugs ready to punch fans. Things like NBA Cares are designed to counter that image.

The league is taking another PR hit right now for this ridiculous lockout. When it ends, community involvement from players will be part of the image rehabilitation effort.

Except the players may want no part of that, reports David Aldridge at NBA.com.

There is incredible anger among players just under the surface. Anger at having to give up hundreds of millions of dollars, of course, but also anger stemming from their feeling that they aren’t being treated as partners by the owners, but as employees… But that anger, no matter what side of the divide you are on, is real, and it threatens to do great damage to the league well after the lockout is over. I cannot tell you how furious players are that this lockout continues….

Over and over in the last two weeks, I have heard the same refrain from players and agents, from big markets and small ones, max guys and minimum salaried guys. You can forget asking about community service work. You can forget asking for cooperation for NBA Cares. Basketball Without Borders? Don’t even ask…

And one agent intimated that players who would normally try to gut their way through injuries and assorted other hurts now will wait until they’re 100 percent before returning to the court. Why should they jeopardize their careers, the agent asked, when the owners obviously care nothing about them?


Most players have a certain number of team appearances written into their contract (the have to do a preset number of charity events a year with the team). Many players have gone will above and beyond that trying to help the team, league and the community.

But if the players feel like 9-5 employees, they are going to start punching the clock like them. Once they are out the door they will stop caring about the team and league.

Just another ugly spinoff from this lockout.

Winderman: Tone of labor talks could lead to fewer player/fan interactions

Steve Nash
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The traditional defining moment of the end of NBA lockout is the handshake between David Stern and Billy Hunter, followed by some sort of blathering about the “partnership” going forward.

Until now, with a defined percentage of revenues going to players, there was something to be said about the legitimacy of that partnership. When league revenues went up, the cap went up and the players shared in the growth.

When revenues declined or remained flat, the escrow withheld from players’ salaries would offset the shortfall.

But now, as the parties resume negotiations, there is talk of a differing approach. The league still is tying the agreement to percentages, but one formula being proposed would set a percentage for the players at the start of a new agreement and essentially then hold firm to that actual annual cash payout. As league revenues grow, the players’ share would not grow commensurately.

And that could change the dynamic dramatically.

No longer would the players be given the opportunity, as the parlance goes, to “grow the game” for mutual benefit.

That, in turn, could turn what mostly has been cordial into something more contentious.

Among the secrets of the CBA are mandatory appearances by players on behalf of teams, yes, including many of those supposed feel-good interactions.

For all the spin by the various PR machines, the players are required, yes required, to make those appearances.

The previous agreement called for 12 appearances per season, corporate and fan events mandating an hour of the player’s time.

Beyond that, the previous CBA called for four “connects,” meetings of 30 minutes or less with fans or fan groups.

While operating the league and union as a true partnership, it not only was not unusual for players to stay longer than required at such appearances, but players often would willingly exceed those 16 required appearances.

That, after all, is what partners do.

But when growing the game only grows one side of the equation, one has to wonder how far the good will would extend.

In recent years, the notion of partnership has fueled the NBA’s growth. The last thing the league needs now is a hollow handshake at the end of this contentiousness.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat.

For many NBA players, charity is not just a tax write off

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cbutler_interview.jpgThe NBA Cares. It does, but the league has other motives, as well.

The NBA hypes up its players doing community work — talking at schools, visiting children in the hospital — in part because it’s good for the league’s image. It’s something to try and counter the stories of arrests and crimes that also follow some NBA players. There’s a reason you see it every nationally televised NBA game.

But that’s just the hype. For a lot of players, giving back is not something they do just as a tax write off.

Caron Butler this summer did his annual “Bike Brigade” in his hometown of Racine, Wisconsin, where he gave away hundreds of bicycles to area youth. He hosts annual back-to-school drives like he did in Washington DC last year, he has hosted numerous charity basketball games, he went to Johannesburg, South Africa, to conduct free basketball clinics. I could probably fill up the Internet with Butler’s charity endeavors.

He’s quick to tell you that he does all this because he wants to, because he wants to give back to the community. He’s sincere and he cares. He isn’t organizing and attending events for  the publicity or to save some money come April 15.

And he said there are a lot of players out there like him.

“I think there are other guys out there doing it,” Butler told PBT last week. “This is something I’ve been doing since day one, since I got into the league. I probably just had a camera crew out after four or five years of doing it… after a while people just started paying more attention to what I was doing and understand that what I did was from my heart and I was passionate about it. That wasn’t just a once a year thing, this was something I was committed to year in and year out.

“And I do believe there are other guys out there like that.”

Dwyane Wade said something similar to Matt Moore writing at CBSSoports Facts & Rumors blog. Wade was at the Alonzo Mourning Summer Groove event, then there is this weekend’s Wade’s World Charity Weekend in Chicago.

Yet right now, Wade is painted as a villain by many, part of the hated Heat. (Although Wade may be the least hated of the big three.) The focus is on the negative, not the positive.

“Yeah, I don’t think the world focuses on the positive things enough. I understand being the villain is what people like. People play to that. They want to know about the villain. They don’t want to know about the good. They say they do, but statistics show that they don’t. The thing is, I don’t do these things for recognition, being a good teammate, being a positive member of the community. I do them because those things make me whole and complete. A lot of that negativity? It’s just speculation. You’ve gotta deal with it and move on. I’ve learned that not everyone’s going to be 100% DWade. Hopefully the ones that do get to know me more and the things that I do and that’s what they make their opinions from, from who I am. Everything else is just speculation.”

I can promise of the coming months you are going to read on this blog about more NBA players getting arrested because they did something stupid. Don’t know who or when, but know it will happen.

And for every one of those, there are a handful more NBA players doing something good in their community that will go unnoticed. In part because they are doing it for the right reasons, they are not calling a press conference for it. We can promise you that, too.

NBA eyes the Indian market, delegates Pau Gasol as a league ambassador

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As basketball becomes more and more of an international game, the NBA continues to look for opportunities to expand its base. Exhibition games have been played in several other countries (Mexico, the U.K., China), broadcasts are translated and sent out all over the world, and the NBA hosts all kinds of events across almost every continent in its expansion.

Obviously, big markets catch the NBA’s eye. While there’s something to be said about increasing the appeal of the game and popularizing basketball in new countries (and the way those countries would impact the game’s evolution as a result — think the popularity of basketball in Europe has impacted the NBA at all?), these decisions to spread the league’s good word across the world are financial in nature. There are a lot of people not wearing LeBron’s Heat jersey that could be, a lot of television viewers that could be watching but aren’t, and plenty of page views that the dotcom could be getting but isn’t.

China tops the list in terms of national population, and the NBA is off to a roaring start there. Next? India, which has a population of some 1.2 billion people, plenty of whom don’t even know how much they need the NBA just yet. Luckily for them, the league is headed that way to market the hell out of itself. Pau Gasol will headline NBA Cares events in multiple Indian cities next week, including a clinic for underprivileged children and one for the participants in the Mahindra NBA Challenge (explained below). From the release:

The league is in the midst of hosting a record number of events in India this summer. Gasol, a member of the two-time defending champion Los Angeles Lakers, is the second NBA superstar to visit India this month following Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard’s visit to Bangalore and Delhi from Aug. 10 to 14.

“I have always wanted to visit India and I am very excited to represent the Lakers and the NBA in a country where basketball is on the rise,” said Gasol.  “As an international player in the NBA, I know how important it is to do my part to grow the game globally and would love to compete against a player from India in the NBA one day.”

Gasol will make appearances with the Larry O’Brien Trophy to take photos with fans in Mumbai and Delhi.  This will be the first time that the trophy will be in India.  He will also conduct clinics in Mumbai on Aug. 26 for participants of the Mahindra NBA Challenge, the league’s first community-based basketball league in India, which tipped off in Mumbai, Bangalore, and Ludhiana this summer and attracted thousands of participants, including top players from each city.