Tag: NBA Awards

Miami Heats' LeBron James plays against the Philadelphia 76ers during their NBA basketball game in Miami

NBA quarter pole awards: Yes, LeBron is the MVP


We are a quarter of the way into the NBA season, which is far too early to start talking about end of the season awards, playoffs or much of anything else.

I’m going to anyway.

Here are the awards in a few categories as we reach the quarter pole. We’ve got a long back stretch not to mention the final straightaway to go, but right now we’re starting to get a feel for the races (and some other random categories thrown in).

League MVP: LeBron James. A bunch of LeBron haters just read that then used my name in conjuction with some anatomically impossible acts, but it’s the truth — LeBron has been far and away the best player in the league so far. His PER is more than 8-points higher than the guy in second (Kobe Bryant, technically Manu Ginobili is closer but he has been out). Michael Jordan never had a PER this high for an entire season. He is averaging 29.7 points (on 56.4 percent shooting), 8.3 rebounds and 7.3 assists plus a couple of blocks per game. He is getting to the free throw line more, his post game is better, his shot selection is better, his midrange jumper is improved… and he was already the best player in the league. Kobe and Kevin Durant can battle it out for a distant second with a lot of ground to close.

Best team in the league: The Miami Heat. Yes, the Chicago Bulls have played better team defense and have a better record, plus with the addition of Richard Hamilton their offense is vastly improved. Miami has had injuries (Dwyane Wade is still out) but their new up-tempo offense, the addition of Norris Cole and Shane Battier, plus getting Mike Miller healthy means they are still the team to beat. Miami made the finals last year and are better this year. The Bulls and Thunder can make a serious run at them, but watching the Heat get some easy buckets with their new offense makes me think they are still the team holding up the trophy at the end of the year.

Who are the dark horse contenders: Denver in the West, Orlando in the East: Denver is playing fantastic team basketball — fast and good on offense, with impressive ball sharing and balance. If they bring back some of Wilson Chandler, Kenyon Martin and J.R. Smith after the Chinese season ends, they get that much better.

Orlando (despite the off night in Boston) has the best center in the game and has surrounded him with shooters. They run the pick-and-roll well and Ryan Anderson is a perfect fit in the offense (he is four, the guy you want to help off of to Dwight Howard, but he makes you pay for that with his threes). They play good defense and know who they are. If they keep Howard and can survive the rumor mill, they are the team that could threaten the big two in the East in the playoffs (but most likely they are out in the second round, then will Howard stay?).

Most fun team to watch: Minnesota Timberwolves. The Clippers are the obvious choice here — and with Chris Paul, Blake Griffin, D’Andre Jordan and the rest they certainly are a good choice. But I find myself gravitating toward Ricky Rubio, Kevin Love and the Timberwolves. They are a team getting better every game and that makes them fun to watch.

Most disappointing team: New York Knicks. I thought going into the season they were the third best team in the East, but not only are they losing they look ugly doing it. Carmelo Anthony is not a point forward and Mike D’Antoni has ill-fitting pieces for his system. They need Baron Davis, and I don’t love Baron Davis as a savior. And somebody start using Amare Stoudemire and Tyson Chandler better in the pick-and-roll, they are beasts. Honorable mention to the Celtics and Lakers.

Rookie of the Year: Ricky Rubio. This is shaping up as a two point guard battle, with Kyrie Irving as the other guy. And certainly Rubio has more talent around him to work with, but he comes in a much more polished floor general and a guy who can command a game. Plus his shot is better than we expected at 37.1 percent from three (the mechanics are still a little odd and shot-put like, but fixable).

Sixth Man of the Year: James Harden. It’s not close. There are the Williamses — Lou in Philly and Mo with the Clippers — who are playing well, but the only way Harden loses this is if Scott Brooks sobers up and moves Harden to the starting lineup.

Coach of the Year: Doug Collins, Philadelphia. This is one where there are few good candidates — Nate McMillan in Portland, Frank Vogel in Indiana, George Karl in Denver — and it is really open. But I’ll go with Collins, who has given Philadelphia a system that has made them the story of the young season.

Thing we’ve not liked this season: Sloppy basketball. The lack of training camp, the condensed schedules leaving less practice time, conditioning, it has all led to much sloppier basketball then we saw in years past. It feels like preseason games far too many nights. It’s not pretty to watch. The blame goes on everyone — owners and players — because they wanted as much money as they could after the lockout and gave us this ugly schedule with ugly, sloppy games. It’s hard to watch at points.

General Managers predict Durant as MVP over LeBron, Lakers three-peat


Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Durant_dunk.jpgYou’re not the only one who thinks there will be voter fatigue — or backlash, if you wish — against LeBron James when it comes time for MVP voting.

General managers around the NBA seem to think so, according to the results published at TrueHoop. In its annual survey of GMs, NBA.com found one just one vote for LeBron James to three-peat as MVP. One. Same as Dwight Howard. Kevin Durant was the runaway winner with two-thirds of the vote.

Durant may well be MVP (he’s my pick) and he will be deserving — he was the league’s leading scorer last year and the clear leader on an up-and-coming team that could make the next step this season.

But James is the two-time, clear winner MVP and now will be the best player on one of the best teams in the league.

The fact that just one GM (can I guess Pat Riley?) voted for James speaks more the James burnout than anything. Around the league teams are tired (and a little jealous) of all the Heat talk. They want to knock them off the perch.

Those same GMs think the Lakers will — 63 percent predict a three-peat for the Lakers. The Heat got one-thirds of the votes, the Celtics got one vote.

Other votes include:

* John Wall got 68 percent of the vote as the likely Rookie of the Year, with Clippers’ Blake Griffin second.

* Deron Williams got half the vote to be named best point guard over Chris Paul, the first time D-Will has beat CP3.

* For the first time in eight years, Tim Duncan was not named best power forward. Dirk Nowitzki and Pau Gasol tied for that honor.

* As you would expect, Dwight Howard was the best center running away, LeBron the best small forward and Kobe the best two guard. Kobe also won the vote for guy you most want taking the last shot, for the ninth straight year.

* Derrick Rose was voted fastest with the ball, Ray Allen the best pure shooter.

* The most fun team to watch according to GMs? The Oklahoma City Thunder. They got that one right.

Winderman: NBA awards should not ignore the playoffs


Thumbnail image for Rondo_Charge.jpgThose ballots, the ones that had to be in no later than the close of the regular season, is it possible we might be able to get them back?

Like every other major sports league, the NBA closes the balloting for its annual awards in advance of the postseason.

Yet, as we’ve already seen over this past month, those first six months of competition aren’t exactly the most meaningful, now that the Mavericks, Cavaliers, Dirk and LeBron are gone.

Yet there is no summoning rewrite.

A few years back, when I asked David Stern about holding off such balloting until the end of the playoffs, his curt response was that the league also has a postseason award, the MVP of the NBA Finals.

But that voting only takes into account the league’s best-of-seven championship series, not the two-month breath of the postseason.

Unlike Major League Baseball, with its month of postseason games after its six months of regular-season play, or even the NFL, with its 16 regular-season games and as few as three postseason wins required for a Super Bowl, the NBA goes six months during the regular season and another two during the postseason.

That essentially is a quarter of the season ignored.

And the need to present the hardware while the playoffs still are in progress doesn’t wash. Baseball hands out its awards well after the World Series, some served up with Thanksgiving dinner, with the NHL holding an awards banquet after the Stanley Cup Finals that draws Idol-like ratings north of the border.

As it is, the NBA has become a master at turning irrelevancy into prime-time programming, as evidenced by this week’s draft lottery. Think about it, we’re talking NBA TV programming throughout July, ESPN having more than baseball highlights to offer in advance of NFL camps.

So what would have changed? Here’s what:

— Kobe Bryant, with his current momentum, easily could have passed LeBron James for Most Valuable Player. Shouldn’t the MVP be remembered for having the greatest impact on the entirety of a season?

— Rajon Rondo certainly would not have been left off the All-NBA teams and might have contended for a first-team spot. Right now, he justifiably can be viewed as the best point guard in the league.

— Doc Rivers would soar in the Coach of the Year balloting. In retrospect, holding back his veterans matched Scott Skiles pushing his underachievers or Scott Brooks barely advancing into the playoffs.

— Lamar Odom would be pushing Jamal Crawford for the Sixth Man Award. What he is accomplishing in reserve is coming with the stakes elevated.

— A case could be made for third-team Pau Gasol moving ahead of second-team Dirk Nowitzki on All-NBA.

No, it is not an equal playing field, with nearly half the league being dropped from the postseason equation.

But what the Celtics currently are proving is that the playoffs are where a season is defined, where reputations truly are delineated.

Unless, of course, it comes to NBA awards.

Then, somehow, a December Cavaliers-Clippers game carries more weight than Lakers-Celtics in June.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

LeBron James accepts his MVP award

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A whole bunch of people showed up to watch LeBron James formally accept his MVP award. And he gave a pretty good speech.

Don’t believe me? Check it out for yourself.


Winderman: The dirty little secret of NBA awards voting


Having read Rob Mahoney’s post in this space earlier, and having caught up on Howard Beck’s screed on the New York Times’ “Off the Dribble” blog, it is time to weigh in on the NBA’s dirty little secret, and why so many seemingly out-of-bounds ballots are cast in the polling for the league’s postseason awards.

Yes, the vote for each individual NBA postseason award other than Executive of the Year is a media poll.

And, yes, transparency should be a priority for any self-respecting media member.

Only in this case, it is not that simple.

And all is not as it appears.

In recent years, several media outlets have banned their employees from voting for such awards, due to concerns about conflicts of interests.

Beyond that, as the media industry contracts, there are fewer traveling beat reporters, with many teams being covered by a single newspaper beat writer on the road.

When the postseason ballots are distributed to media-relations staffs, the priority is distributing them to those who see the team on a fulltime basis, both home and away.

And that’s where it gets murky and why more than a few self-serving votes apparently are being cast.

Among the electorate are NBA employees, those directly drawing checks from the teams themselves.

Television broadcasters. Television analysts. Radio play-by-play men. Radio color commentators.

Take the Miami Heat, for example. Postseason voting privileges are granted to five team employees who work for the organization’s broadcast outlets.

While all have ample credentials and integrity, the fact remains that employees of teams are voting in award races that involve players on those teams.

The league’s rationalization is it is the only way to create to substantial electorate.

But these are employees of the very same teams that are creating award campaigns.

It is one thing to have votes cast from broadcasters from national media outlets. Their paychecks aren’t signed by the Knicks or Nets or Nuggets.

But as long as team employees are voting, the process will remain suspect even with total transparency.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.