Tag: NBA amnesty clause

NBPA Meet To Discuss Current CBA Offer

Billy Hunter outlines labor deal, steps remaining in memo

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You have questions… but mostly they revolve around finding a way for your favorite team to trade for Dwight Howard or maybe Rajon Rondo.

NBA players have questions about the new NBA Collective Bargaining Agreement, too. Theirs mostly revolve around, “When can we get back to work and get paid? And how much are we going to get paid?”

Billy Hunter tried to explain both the deal and the process to the players in a memo obtained by Sam Amick of Sports Illustrated.

As for the timing, first the players have to vote to reform the union (remember the union formally dissolved to make way for the antitrust lawsuits against the league). That process should have started Tuesday, Hunter says in the memo. Once that happens the details of the CBA will be hammered out between the two sides.

Hunter says the players will get to vote on the new CBA next week. With training camps and free agency set to open next Thursday, you can bet that gets done early in the week.

Then Hunter gets around to explaining the money.

Over the course of the 10-year agreement, collective player salaries and benefits will increase from $2.17 billion in 2010-11 to more than $3 billion by the end of the deal. If revenues exceed modest growth, we expect that collective player salaries will likely grow to over $3.5 billion. The average player salary will approach $8 million by the end of the deal.

Although players will not receive 57% of BRI as under the 2005 CBA, collective player salaries should experience the same annual salary growth as the last deal.… Nonetheless, thanks to the enormous success projected for the NBA, league revenues should grow so high that our collective annual salary increases will favorably compare to the increases we received under the 2005 CBA. On average, under the last deal, the players received annual collective salary increases of $70 million per season. Under the new agreement… the players will receive collective annual increases averaging at least $85 million each year over the term of the 10-year agreement. Beginning in 2012-13, we expect that collective salaries will increase by more than $100 million per season.

Hunter goes on to explain the challenges of the increased luxury tax but how they were able to maintain some flexibility for teams to spend who are paying the tax. The goal was to allow more player movement despite the tax, he said.

Go read the deal. Not all the players will like it and the memo is certainly Hunter selling it to his constituents. But at the end of the day they are not going to get a better offer and it’s not worth losing more pay to fight over the scraps.

Tuesday morning one liners: Rumor mill starting to spin

Kris Humphries Nets

If you read one thing on the new NBA CBA, this breakdown by Larry Coon of ESPN should be it. This will make you smarter.

Here is a complete list of all 129 free agents that hit the market Dec. 9.

It makes almost no sense for the Lakers to make a run at Kris Humphries, they have more pressing needs (point guard) and no money to spend really, but that is the rumor from one quarter.

Whatever the Washington Wizards decide to do with the amnesty clause, Rashard Lewis wins.

The Wizards top priority is to ink Nick Young to a longer deal.

A lot of teams are eyeing Brandon Roy if the Blazers use the amnesty clause on him as expected, but don’t expect him to slip past the Timberwolves or Warriors in the bidding process. (This time around guys waived by amnesty cannot just choose a team; rather teams under the salary cap can bid to pick up a portion of their contract and the highest bid gets the player.)

NBA.com’s David Aldridge says the Celtics are looking very hard at Tyson Chandler as a free agent. I looked really hard at a $5 million beachfront home once, didn’t mean I could afford it. (The Celtics don’t have the cap space for a run at Chandler.)

Expect the Nets to make a run at Tayshaun Prince.

Expect the Pistons to make a run at Big Baby (that’s Glen Davis to the rest of us).

how u? A lot of players are lobbying Roger Mason Jr. to come play for them.

Making the argument that the NBA lockout was about the owners trying to control the workers more than it was just about the money.

A report that Andrea Bargnaini seems to have lost weight and is moving well. That’s nice.

In what is really news to nobody, the Memphis Grizzlies say they will match any offer another team makes to Marc Gasol.

The Golden State Warriors are in the market for a big man. Who isn’t?

We talked about this before the lockout and we can do so again now — the Bobcats buyout of Bismack Biyombo from Spain is not going to be that simple.

It sure looks like President Barack Obama wears Under Armour when he plays hoop (as noticed by Henry Abbott at TrueHoop).

Report: Blazers expected to use amnesty clause on Roy

Dallas Mavericks v Portland Trail Blazers - Game Four

Is it time for the Portland Trail Blazers to cut bait with Brandon Roy?

It looks like they are, according to a tweet from John Canzano, radio and television personality in the area.

Blazers appear ready to exercise amnesty on Brandon Roy…. Hoping they take a longer look at him before they do it.

Roy has four years, $68 million left on his contract — which was not a bad deal at the time, he was one of the top guards in the game and is still just 27. But there is no cartlidge left in his knee — it’s bone-on-bone — which is why he played just 47 games last season and can’t be counted on to do the heavy lifting any more.

Still, should the Blazers take a longer look at him, bring him into training camp as Canzano suggested? On one hand it can’t hurt. The thing is, Roy may look good in camp after a summer of treatment and rest. The real question is how his knee feels in February, in April and through the playoffs. Last year he gave us one brilliant playoff game, but is that enough?

What about keeping Roy around longer? To keep Roy around for one more season would cost the Blazers about $8 million, Ben Golliver estimated for CSNNW.com. He thinks that’s worth the test.

A test year for Roy would give the once-vaunted Roy/Aldridge/Oden trio one last shot at playoff success, delaying the roster explosion decision until next fall. It could allow the Blazers to focus their short-term free agency efforts on adding better-than-minimum quality to their frontcourt and would help keep the all-important chemistry and continuity from last season despite all the lockout turmoil. Roy sells tickets, captures imaginations and has been the face of the franchise for roughly four years. A fast, clean break will not come without significant public relations costs; cutting ties means killing hope, however unlikely, for a return to All-Star form. If it’s your job to sell tickets and court sponsors, aren’t you pitching Allen that the extra $8 million will produce some bottom-line benefits?

I’m not convinced. Roy is not going to be an All-Star again. Portland needs a new star to replace him and they can try to get that through free agency or the deep upcoming draft. But to see if Roy has some magic left for a full season — and maybe Greg Oden can come back too and contribute — seems more fantasy than reality.

All that said, it’s Paul Allen’s team, who knows what they will do? We’d ask the GM but they don’t have a permanent one.

Mike Miller still likely gone in Miami, amnesty casualty

Chicago Bulls v Miami Heat - Game Four

In an ideal world, the Miami Heat would like to keep Mike Miller around, because if he does bounce back from last season’s injuries and this summer’s surgeries, he is a perfect fit. He can stretch the floor with his shot, is a solid team defender and can rebound.

But alas, the math of the new NBA collective bargaining agreement likely sends him packing as one of the early amnesty casualties.

Miller has four years, $23.6 million left on his deal and that likely will be too rich for the Heat’s blood, reports Brian Windhorst at ESPN. The reason is the Heat need to free up some salary room because they want to use their mid-level exception to bring in a defensive center.

In layman’s terms, it means that if the Heat use the mid-level exception they cannot spend over $74.3 million this season. In effect, this is a hard salary cap even though neither the union nor the league sold it that way. Simply, the Heat need to add some free agents and they can’t keep themselves under that threshold with Miller’s $5.4 million on their books.

Once the Heat sign rookie point guard Norris Cole, their payroll will be about $67 million… That gives them a roughly $7 million window to spend on the rest of the team if they use their mid-level exception. They probably just can’t get there.

It shakes out like this — the Heat need a big man in the middle and the likely target is Samuel Dalembert (Nene and Tyson Chandler are too expensive). If they keep Miller they can only offer the tax-payers mid-level of $3 million, but without Miller they can offer the full mid-level at $5 million. Already that is below what Dalembert will get offered somewhere else (almost certainly) but he might take it for the chance to get a ring. Pat Riley is good at selling those kinds of things. Nobody is selling Dalembert on $3 million.

(And for the record, Dalembert is a huge upgrade over Joel Anthony. Better rebounder, much better on offense, defends the rim just about as well.)

But it’s going to take the full MLE — and no Miller — to make that happen. So even though the Heat can keep him around….

Don’t expect many amnesty clause players this season

Arenas magic

Finally, thanks to an amnesty clause in the new labor deal, every NBA team can wipe one bad contract off their books and never have to deal with it again. A “get out of jail free” card for NBA GMs. We like to call it the Gilbert Arenas rule. That should lead to a flood of players kicked to the curb, right? RIGHT?

Wrong. More like a trickle.

Because teams have a few years to use it (so long as the player is on the roster pre-lockout they can use it whenever), most teams are putting the amnesty card in their back pocket, reports Howard Beck at the New York Times.

“I don’t think there will be very many at all,” said one team executive, who asked to remain anonymous while the lockout remains in effect.

At most, three to six teams will take advantage of the amnesty clause this year, the executive said — a view that was echoed by others around the league. The reasons are varied and complicated.

Some teams are so far above the cap that removing one player will not provide room to sign free agents. A few teams have such low payrolls that they would dip below the minimum-payroll requirements. At least 10 teams have no obvious candidates for amnesty.

We call it the Gilbert Arenas rule, although the Magic could use it on Hedo Turkoglu and we’d understand. (Remember in all cases the player still gets paid his full contract, it just comes off salary cap and luxury tax numbers.) But that is the exception of having an obvious target to amnesty.

A more typical case might be the Los Angeles Lakers. Sure, they would like to trim some of the $93 million they have in salary next season and to amnesty a player is one way. They could use it on Luke Walton, but he comes off the books the same year the tax goes up so you only really get a short-term boost letting him go. They could let Metta World Peace (Ron Artest) go, he is owed three years and $18.8 million. But wouldn’t the Lakers be better off trying to win with him for another year and then losing him next season (or the season after when the tax goes up)? The Lakers are way over the cap and the luxury tax line, who are they going to pick up that is better than World Peace to fill that role?

Most GMs don’t have an obvious hand to play, so they may sit on their cards and see how things play out. They know when to hold ‘em.

Of course, if they hadn’t given out these contracts in the first place….