Tag: Mychal Thompson

Mychal Thompson

Mychal Thompson says the players need to take 50/50 deal


For a number of former NBA players, they don’t really get this lockout. Oh, they understand the mechanics of it; they just don’t get exactly what the players are fighting for and why. To them, the players are doing well and 50/50 sounds fair.

They sound like many fans.

Mychal Thompson, former No. 1 overall pick of Portland who went on to win some rings with the Showtime Lakers, is among that majority. He spoke about it during a promotional push for Radioflag.com (more on it below).

“Sure the players have to protect their interests… but from a players perspective, if I was in the league now, I’d think a 50/50 split is fair,” Thompson told ProBasketballTalk. “You work out the particulars from there. I don’t see how it cannot be worked out because there’s common ground.

“Okay, so (the players) don’t get everything we want, we sort of got all the gravy the last 10 years, now it’s time to readjust, reassess things and we may have to give back some money. But my goodness, we’re still going to be making a lot of money even if we have to take a 10 to 12 percent pay cut.”

“Even the guys on the high end of the luxury tax. Let’s say you’re making $15 (million) and you’ve got to take a 10 percent pay cut — my goodness young man you’re still bringing in $13 million bucks…

“I know we all want to be Bill Gates or Warren Buffet someday, but you have to put it in perspective. If now I have to sign a five-year deal for $50 (million) as opposed to $60 (million) I think my life will be just fine.”

You have to wonder of Thompson’s son — Warriors first round pick Klay Thompson — feels the same way. Klay will feel the impact of the new labor agreement directly. Although, right now he’d just like to start collecting paychecks, his father said.

Thompson said he’s spoken to Klay about maintaining discipline and stay focused through the lockout so he is ready to go when it ends.

“He’s played in pickup games, very informal, but nothing like there would be if there was a normal summer league…” Thompson said. “He’s working to get stronger and quicker.”

Mychal is a fixture on the radio in Los Angeles, doing an afternoon talk show on 710 ESPN Radio for years as well as being the radio color commenter for Lakers games. That’s how he got connected with RadioFlag — a new app that both lets you listen to countless radio stations from your smartphone and is like social network for radio fans. It lets them interact with hosts and other listeners.

“It allows you to listen to live radio content in whatever genre you want — sports talk or news talk or music — and you can interact with other listeners who like what you do,” Thompson said.

Promoting RadioFlag is fun and all, but Thompson would rather get back on the road calling and watching basketball. Which is why he wants to see a deal done. You listening, players?

NBA draft profile: Klay Thompson can shoot, teams like that

F Washington State

Klay Thompson can shoot. His stroke is pure.

In a draft where everyone has serious question marks, if you can consistently put the ball in the hole the thing you do well is something every team needs. Thompson caught scouts eyes as a shooter as he filled it up in college — Washington State ran him off screens all day long — and he knocked it down at a 39.8 percent pace from three (and that was with defenses targeting him).

Then he went to the NBA Draft Combine and looked like the best shooter according to reports. Then everywhere he has gone for workouts he has impressed with his touch from deep — to the point Knicks president Donnie Walsh (formerly of the Pacers) threw around the Reggie Miller comparison.

Thompson has a long way to go to get anywhere near Miller, but it gives you an idea of what scouts think about his shooting. He gets raves.

Like everyone else in this draft, Thompson — the son of former No. 1 overall pick and Showtime era Laker Mychal Thompson — still has questions to answer in the pros.

He is not an explosive athlete — he’s not a guy who is going to create his own shot at the next level. Yes, some guys in the NBA get around that but it’s much harder on the wing (as a two or three) where the NBA’s best athletes play. He is 6’7” and shoots with a high release so he doesn’t need much space, but he isn’t going to create much of it himself at the next level (if a guy is running out on his at the arc he can put it on the floor to get around him, but he doesn’t have the ball handling to get to the rim and doesn’t finish great there anyway).

The bigger concern is defense — he wasn’t great at that in college, his lateral movement is average at best and, again, on the wings in the NBA he will be matched up against ridiculously good athletes. Could he be a guy who scores but costs you as many points at the other end?

One thing you don’t hear mentioned a whole lot is the marijuana possession arrest and him having to leave the Cougars team. NBA teams may have concerns, but they seem to see that as a blip not a pattern.

There are questions. But there are things we know — he knows how to get open off screens and he knows how to soot the rock.

If you’re going to take a gamble, you take a gamble on a guy who you know can put the ball in the hole.

Thompson has been steadily moving up the board over the past couple months. Our man Steve Alexander at NBC’s Rotoworld has him going at No. 15 to the Pacers (where the Reggie Miller comparisons would never end). But that is about the farthest he will fall (sorry Knicks fans). DraftExpress has him going No. 14 the Rockets, while ESPN’s Chad Ford has him going No. 10 to the Bucks (a team that could use some offense).

If there was one guy in that range teams might trade up to get it would be Thompson — sometimes GMs fall in love with a shooter. Something to watch.