Tag: MVP

LaMarcus Aldridge, Pau Gasol

Could LaMarcus Aldridge win MVP? Well, no, but let’s talk about it anyway


Welcome to today’s “There’s a week left until training camp and I’d chew my own arm off if it meant I could blog about it” post.

Blazers Edge posted a link to a story on Rip City Project on Saturday night. It contained the following passage regarding LaMarcus Aldridge and a possible MVP bid:

It never ceases to amaze me how we go into seemingly every NBA season now with the hopes that Aldridge will finally get his due, but it never quite seems to materialize in the way that it should.  Kevin Love and Blake Griffin are the flashy up-and-comers whom most NBA fans seem to recognize and heap praise on. And although Aldridge is every bit as good (and probably better) than both of them, he never seems to get the respect he deserves.  Maybe that’s due in part to growing up in the NBA with Roy and Oden as far more recognizable teammates, but if so, the time for that is past.  Last season, the Blazers cut the cord with their past, and chose to move into a new era that has Aldridge as the central figure.

Sometimes perception is just as important as numbers when you talk about someone having an MVP-type season.  While Griffin and Love may put up bigger numbers, neither guy is as good as Aldridge on defense, and his arsenal of offensive attacks is far more vast than what either of his counterparts has to offer. Part of that is due to having more years in the league to develop, but because of Aldridge’s more well rounded game, the other two guys should not be mentioned before him in MVP talk.

Now, I’m not saying he will win an MVP, but wondering if he’s capable of having an MVP-type year.

via LaMarcus Aldridge: MVP Candidate, or Borderline All-Star? – Rip City Project – A Portland Trailblazers Fan Site – News, Blogs, Opinion and More.

Now, I’m not here to beat up on a small fan blog for posting a supportive piece about a player. The tone is pretty common on the series of tubes. “The media/people who don’t follow the team I like don’t understand how good the players are on the team I like and instead like other players as if they watched all the games and not just those of the team I like and therefore do not have enough information and they, not I, are woefully uninformed.”

But what I thought was interesting is the discussion of numbers versus versatility.

The way the above argument is framed, Love and Griffin have flashier numbers and that is why they receive the attention. In reality, Aldridge is considered less because of the issues with his numbers, not the superiority of Griffin’s and Love’s. Aldridge’s rebounding is in fact an issue. A lot of that is because of his role in the Blazers’ offense. You can’t throw out the usual pace argument, though, because his True Rebounding Percentage (percentage of all available rebounds snagged) still fell woefully behind Griffin and Love’s. That’s an issue.

But the core there is the versatility argument. Aldridge has more post moves than Love or Griffin, has the face-up jumper and some moves off the dribble (though Love’s versatility is pretty strong considering his range). Do we underrate versatility? You might be able to make that argument when we look at the candidacy of Derrick Rose, Kobe Bryant, Dwight Howard, Kevin Durant, even Steve Nash. But LeBron James kind of renders that point irrelevant. His strength lies not just in his brilliance, but in his versatility. That first point though, is where Aldridge gets tripped up.

He doesn’t shoot at an elite level. He doesn’t rebound at an elite level. It’s not enough to be able to do more than one thing if you don’t do any one single thing at a level which can be considered the best on any given night. He’s elite in the post so you can consider that, but it’s hard to really focus on that given how pitiful the Blazers’ offense was and how much they needed that, though that shouldn’t necessarily eliminate him. But the field goal percentage still hurts him there.

Now that I’ve made it seem like LaMarcus Aldridge is lacking in so many regards, let’s clear this up.

Aldridge is a fantastic player. He is the sun and the moon for the Blazers, and he’s remained so since his rookie season, despite the franchise constantly billing Brandon Roy and Greg Oden, then Nicolas Batum over him. He’s been an All-Star worthy player the past three years and yet still took so long to nab his spot. He doesn’t complain in the press, he doesn’t show up his opponent, he has an actual drop-step hook and he goes out and guns it every night when the Blazers aren’t tanking. He’s worthy of being on the list of consideration. He just can’t be considered a serious contender, because of the level of play in this league. It says nothing bad about Aldridge that he’s not on the serious list. It just says a lot about those who are.

And in the end, considering how he approaches the game, and his life, and the level of headaches he provides those around him, I’d rather have him than a lot of other candidates anyway.

LeBron James and an award we’ve made hollow

Miami Heat forward James reacts after his second quarter dunk against the New York Knicks during Game 2 of their first round NBA Eastern Conference basketball playoff in Miami

For just about anyone else winning the NBA’s Most Valuable Award would be a good thing, with no downside. It’s an award that carries legitimate weight, not just in terms of current cultural cache, but longer-lasting greatness in the context of a player’s legacy. It should be cause for celebration.

But for LeBron James, it’s somehow another reflection of his failures, another illustration of what he’s not.

To be clear, James was the winner of the award as the AP reported Friday for good reason. He put in not the most efficient season of his career, or the most statistically significant. It wasn’t his best season defensively, he wasn’t the best player on the best team (a terrible way to decide the award) , and he certainly didn’t carry his team further than the other candidates given his sparkling supporting cast.

But for James, this was his most impactful season. You saw him everywhere, and you saw him controlling the game. Running the offense, finishing on the break, blocking chase downs, locking up the best perimeter players, locking up the best post players, playing in the post on offense, hitting shots on the outside. Even his fourth quarter foibles took a step up in the last month of the season. There should be nothing but celebration and praise for James’ play.

But there won’t be. There will, however, be a lot of this.

“That’s OK, LeBron, but where are your rings?”


“Individual MVPs don’t make champions.”

As if James, who did not lobby for this award, who did not ask for his third in four years, who never insinuated that this award means anything other than the respect of the voters, asked to be held by this standard, to be anointed as champion based on winning a Kia. I get it. The “Chosen One” tattoo. The King moniker which is as much a Nike marketing ploy as anything. There’s no doubting it’s obnoxious. But the bitterness surrounding what has truly been a magnificent season is still shocking.

James was voted the league’s most valuable player, but in his context, it means something entirely different. It would be a pain to fit on the trophy, but “Most Valuable Player despite a considerable portion of the voters  hating him and deliberately withholding votes last year based on his decision to hold a televised event regarding his free agency which probably also impacted this year’s vote and in  spite of a stunning revilement of the idea of going to play with the best of your peers in a league featuring six teams with multiple stars angling for a title in the playoffs” is a bit more accurate. James didn’t just win the vote this year, he won the vote despite people’s intentions.

If there was a way for the voters not to vote for James in good conscience, they would have found it. This isn’t to say Kevin Durant wasn’t worthy. He most certainly was. But if anything, this award should impress you more. He managed to have people basically say “Look, I don’t like it, but he really was the best/most impactful/most outstanding/most valuable basketball player this season.” That’s a pretty impressive accomplishment. And yet it won’t be held as such. It only makes the pressure greater. It’s like throwing bits of cheese on top of Kilimanjaro, but that’s not the point. Winning MVP isn’t validation for James, it’s just another indictment. “You won the individual award, but what about the championship which we always say is about the team unless we’re debating your legacy in which case you need to single-handedly do everything at all times?”

And here’s the kicker. I’m not even complaining that it’s not fair. It is fair. Well, maybe not fair, but it’s simply how this gig works. It’s the price for that “great life” he talked about after the Game 6 loss last year in the Finals. This is what comes with having James’ gift. He’s the most gifted athlete of our time, and his failures, while pretty understandable and relatively on track with that one guy who we stupidly compare everyone to, are undeniable. The rings, they have not come. And so James will accept another trophy, another car to donate to charity, the accolades and backhanded compliments that come with it.

And if he does manage to win a ring, becoming one of the few over the past twenty years to win MVP and the title in the same season?

Well, then, that’s a whole other conversation we’re going to have to have.

(Side note: There’s also a lot of this today: “Just saying, LeBron! Very few players have won the title the same year they won MVP!” as if one thing had anything to do with the other. What, are the voters failing to elect the right person because he doesn’t win the title? Does the real best, or most valuable, or most exceptional, or most whatever you want to call him player always win the title? Was the MVP Dirk Nowitzki last year? Or Kobe Bryant in a comparatively down season in 2010? How about Dwyane Wade in 2006? Furthermore, is that supposed to spook James? Not that he reads the random twitter babbling of idiots, but if he did, is he really going to say “Oh, man, trying to beat Kevin Garnett and the Celtics who have expelled me from the playoffs every season but last when Rajon Rondo was injured and the Spurs/Thunder/Lakers is one thing, but having to win despite a correlation with absolutely no causation that’s occurred, that’s real pressure?” )

LeBron says it “would mean a lot” to win third MVP

Miami Heat v New York Knicks

With games like his 17-point run at the end of the fourth quarter against the Nets Monday, and the fact he outplayed Kevin Durant last time they went head-to-head, LeBron James again appears to be one of the front runners for the MVP. It’s going to be Durant or LeBron (Tony Parker, Kobe Bryant and everyone else is trailing).

A win would mean a third MVP for LeBron. Only eight players have ever won three MVPs and as you would imagine the list is impressive — it includes Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, Wilt Chamberlain and Larry Bird among others.

LeBron has a sense of history about the game and told Brian Windhorst of ESPN that to join that group would be a great honor.

“It would mean a lot, honestly, it would mean a lot,” James said. “If I’m able to win it this year it would be very humbling knowing the caliber of guys who have won it three times.”

“I remember me being a little, scrawny guy from Akron, Ohio, and watching so many greats either watching live or watching games, knowing and loving the history of the game and seeing the guys who have paved the way for myself. I’ve always respected that. I’ve always respected the talent that came before me.”

LeBron is having a magnificent statistical season — 26.9 points per game on 52.8 percent shooting, with 8 rebounds and 6.3 assists per game. He has a league best PER of 30.5. Durant’s numbers are impressive as well — 27.8 points per game on 50.3 percent shooting with 7.9 rebounds and 3.5 assists per game and a PER of 26.7 — but James also contributes more on defense than Durant. It will be close, a group of former MVPs leaned toward Durant. (You can tell us who you would vote for here at NBCSports.com.)

In the larger public perception of LeBron James, winning a third MVP by 27 — only Kareem Abdul-Jabbar had three at a younger age — would change little. Until he gets a championship or championships to go with the MVPs, his achievements will ring hollow with fans who turned on him after he left Cleveland. Winning rings will not bring all of them back, but it could sway the consensus (remember how Kobe Bryant was never going to be as popular again, then he won a few rings and…).

For LeBron, basketball has been fun again this season. That is what he wants the most. The accolades (and maybe rings) will follow that spirit.

“I’m just back to playing the way I play the game, with a lot of fun and a lot of joy and just not proving anything to anyone. Last year I felt I had to prove something to people. I have no idea why. But I got to that point and it took me away from why I love the game so much and I why I love the NBA. I got away from that.

“This year I got back to my seven years in Cleveland, my four years in high school and when I first picked up a basketball at age 9. That’s why I’m more excited about where I’m at today.”

Derrick Rose says he doesn’t know anything about being MVP. Yet.

Derrick Rose, Charlie Villanueva

Derrick Rose will be announced as the NBA’s MVP in the coming weeks. We all know it.

But it’s not official yet. So it was a bit of a shock when Bulls guard C.J. Watson tweeted Friday:

Congrats to drose on winning the MVP he’s played unbelievable this season!!! now just need tibs to win coach of the yr

Rose said after the game he has been told nothing official yet by the league. But maybe Watson knows something Rose doesn’t.

“C.J. knows a lot of people around here, a lot of famous people. A lot of famous people,” Rose said. “So watch that guy.”

Bulls barely, and we mean barely edge Magic without Dwight Howard

Chicago Bulls v Orlando Magic

Bulls 102 Magic 99.

This was a fantastic ballgame that will be overshadowed by narratives about the MVP. The questions will be about how the Magic nearly beat the Bulls with Dwight Howard spending a one-game suspension for hitting 18 techs, and what that says about Howard’s MVP candidacy. The other side will respond with how another brilliant game from Rose nearly resulted in a loss due the defense, which many say is the real MVP of the Bulls, and what that says about his MVP candidacy. In reality, both of those questions are stupid. It was a great game for Rose, an example of why he’s probably winning MVP, and shows that the Magic have some teeth left in them.

Perhaps most notable in the game was how the Bulls were undone by an effective defense and how the Magic’s ability to create ball movement inside led to cuts. The Bulls’ normally tenacious defense was pretty meek today, allowing cuts inside and Ryan Anderson to be active at the rim. On the flipside, the Magic played solid defense in terms of bringing doubles in the post. This gave Bulls fans a full look at what they’re getting from Carlos Boozer in the playoffs. Boozer was terrific in the first quarter, using a nice array of moves to create points in the post. In the fourth, he was mostly a disaster, including a terrible pass out of a soft double that led to a transition bucket from Jason Richardson.

But all the doubles the Magic brought? None of them were committed to keeping the ball out of Rose’s hands on the perimeter. Time and time again Rose caught a kickout pass with a defender trying to recover, ball faked and went right around the defender. The result was a blistering 39 points, 5 assists performance. Though Rose did have five turnovers to those five assists, he also scored those 39 points on just 17 shots. Crazy efficiency. And that was the difference in the game. Well, that and about .000001 seconds.

Jameer Nelson had a shot to tie the game at the end of regulation. He caught and had to pump fake to free himself from Rose. He rose, and fired from 38 feet, making it. The ball left his hand just a tenth of a second late. Waived off, Bulls win.

A great game that showcased that if these two meet in the second round, this could be tougher than most people are counting on.

Provided that Gilbert Arenas doesn’t get minutes. Yeesh.

Some notes:

  • Chris Duhon actually played really well in limited minutes to keep the Magic in it late. Then Gilbert Arenas came in and, well, yeah.
  • Joakim Noah played terribly in the first quarter and was benched for most of the game. Derrick Rose and Tom Thibodeau each took turns screaming at Noah early. Strange.
  • Taj Gibson hit a three loooong two. Actually happened.
  • The Magic still needed that player everyone says they need, who can create perimeter penetration to open up lanes. Turkoglu did some, but wasn’t fast enough and the drives wound up bogging down.