Tag: Mike Miller

Charlotte Hornets v San Antonio Spurs

Tim Duncan wins NBA teammate award despite teammates not being allowed to vote for him


I like the idea of the Twyman-Stokes Teammate of the Year Award. It’s noble to honor the NBA’s best teammate.

Chauncey Billups won the inaugural award in 2013, and Shane Battier took it last year. Both seem to be good teammates.

As does Tim Duncan, who won this year.

Watch for the fine print, though.

NBA release:

NBA players have selected the San Antonio Spurs’ Tim Duncan as the recipient of the 2014-15 Twyman-Stokes Teammate of the Year Award.  The award recognizes the player deemed the best teammate based on selfless play, on- and off-court leadership as a mentor and role model to other NBA players, and commitment and dedication to team.

A panel of NBA Legends nominated six players from each conference for the award and then nearly 300 NBA players submitted their votes through confidential balloting conducted by the league office.

Ten points were awarded for a first-place vote, seven for second, five for third, three for fourth and one for fifth; players were not allowed to vote for a teammate.

Here are the full results (first-place votes, second-place votes, third-place votes, fourth-place votes, fifth-place votes, total points):

1. Tim Duncan, San Antonio (72-59-44-49-21-1494)
2. Vince Carter, Memphis (28-39-30-28-21-818)
3. Elton Brand, Atlanta (21-27-44-23-19-707)
4. Ryan Anderson, New Orleans (31-29-12-19-23-653)
5. Jameer Nelson, Denver (39-14-13-22-33-652)
6. Mike Miller, Cleveland (16-23-26-41-29-603)
7. Steve Blake, Portland (18-23-24-27-22-564)
8. Pau Gasol, Chicago (15-24-20-21-27-508)
9. Andre Iguodala, Golden State (19-18-21-19-15-493)
10. Udonis Haslem, Miami (15-13-24-22-13-440)
11. Caron Butler, Detroit (14-17-20-17-20-430)
12. Al Jefferson, Charlotte (11-13-21-20-46-412)

In case you missed it: “Players were not allowed to vote for a teammate.”

A lot of players outside San Antonio think Duncan is a good teammate. OK. That’s nice. Is that really worth celebrating, though?

They ought to rename it the Twyman-Stokes Hearsay Award.

Blazers waive Brendan Haywood after acquiring him from Cavs

Brendan Haywood, Michael Beasley

On Monday, the Trail Blazers acquired Brendan Haywood and his fully non-guaranteed $10.5 million contract from the Cavs along with Mike Miller and two second-round picks. They followed that up on Thursday by waiving Haywood, as expected. The team announced the move in a press release.

The Portland Trail Blazers have waived center Brendan Haywood, it was announced today by President of Basketball Operations Neil Olshey.

Portland acquired Haywood, guard Mike Miller and two future second round draft picks from the Cleveland Cavaliers on July 27 in exchange for cash considerations.

Haywood was never going to stick with the Blazers. His oddly structured contract made him an attractive trade chip but he hasn’t been a contributor on an NBA team in several years. The Blazers made the trade solely for the picks, and because they weren’t going to sign anyone else with that cap space anyway.

The Blazers are also expected to waive Miller, who will become a free agent and should draw interest from contenders.

Report: LeBron James OKs Mike Miller trade

2015 NBA Finals - Game Three

The last time one of LeBron James’ teams dumped his friend Mike Miller to save money – the Heat via amnesty – it bothered LeBron and contributed to his leaving.

Should the Cavaliers, who just sent Miller to the Trail Blazers in the Brendan Haywood trade, worry?

Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal:

Including Miller in this trade was a pure salary dump, but at least Cleveland owner Dan Gilbert has gone out of his way to spend money in many other situations. In fact, this trade gives the Cavaliers a trade exception that could allow them to spend a lot more on this roster down the road.

That should keep LeBron happy.

For Miller, a few teams are interested. But it’s hard to see the 35-year-old carving out much of a role anywhere this season. He might have just hit that point in the aging curve.

Report: Thunder, Grizzlies, Mavericks interested in Mike Miller

2015 NBA Finals - Game Two

Mike Miller signed with Cleveland for last season following LeBron James north from Miami. That season didn’t work out the way Miller wanted. Off the court, he was an important part of the locker room chemistry, but on the court he fell out of favor early with the Cavs coaching staff and averaged 2.1 points per game during the season. In the Finals, it took a lot of injuries for David Blatt to call Miller’s number, and even then it was in small doses.

Sunday the Cavaliers traded Miller to Portland. However, the Trail Blazers are expected to buy Miller out; they are a rebuilding team who made that trade to get the picks, not an aging veteran.

Once that buyout happens, where might Miller the free agent land? Marc Stein of ESPN had some potential early answers.

The Thunder? Interesting, in that Miller played for new OKC coach Billy Donovan in college and the two are still close to this day. Miller and Kevin Durant are tight.

But here’s the problem: The Thunder already have a roster of 14 guaranteed contracts and have yet to sign first-round pick Josh Huestis. That’s 15, the max allowed. The Thunder don’t have space for him. Memphis is at 15 as well. Someone (not me) must have pointed this out to Stein.

He wants to be on a contender, and he wants to play. The most likely way that happens is Miller starts the season on the NBA sidelines, but when injuries flare up on a team his phone rings.

What he can bring that team at this point on the court is up for debate. But the timing of this move likely leaves him standing and without a chair when the music stops and the season tips off.

Report: Cavaliers trade Brendan Haywood, Mike Miller, two second-round picks to Portland

Milwaukee Bucks v Cleveland Cavaliers

The question was not if but when and where the Cavaliers would trade Brendan Haywood — more accurately, his $10.5 non-guaranteed contract — and what would the price be.

The answers turned out to be Sunday, to Portland, and they threw in Mike Miller and a couple second round picks, for cash.

The expected trade of Haywood has been confirmed by everyone west of the Mississipi. Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports had it first.

The Cavaliers will have two separate trade exceptions – $10.5 million and $2.85 million – that they’ll have one calendar year to use. The Cavaliers can use a trade exception to acquire a player under contract in a deal. Those salaries count against the salary cap, but don’t impact luxury tax payments.

The deal could spare the Cavaliers nearly $10 million in salary and luxury tax payments.

Let’s break down what everybody gets out of this and why they did it.

• The two trade exceptions, $10.5 million and $2.85 million, which can be used to bring in a player mid-season without sending anyone out.
• The Cavaliers likely never use those trade exceptions, making this a move about saving money — almost $10 million when all is said and done. The Cavaliers are already flirting with the $84.7 million tax line without having yet re-signed Tristan Thompson, Matthew Dellavedova, and probably J.R. Smith. Former Nets executive Bobby Marks summed it up well on Twitter.

• Two second-round picks. The first in 2019 is the better of the Timberwolves or Lakers picks (the Cavs have the rights to both). The second is the Cavaliers own pick in 2020.
• Portland will waive Haywood, saving his non-guaranteed money.
• Portland is expected to negotiate a buyout with Miller, allowing the veteran to hook up with an interested contender (he cannot re-sign with the Cavaliers for a year). Whatever he takes less than the $2.85 million he is owed is money the Blazers saves.
• Bottom line, the Blazers just bought two second round picks at $1.4 million apiece.

Who won the trade? It’s not going to move the needle for either team on the court in the short term. So would you prefer to save money or pick up a couple extra future draft picks?