Tag: Mike Dunleavy

Hannibal Buress

Hannibal Buress gets a kid to say Mike Dunleavy is better than Michael Jordan (VIDEO)


Hannibal Buress is one of the funniest people in the world right now, and he happens to be a huge basketball fan, too. Being a Chicago native, he’s a big Bulls fan, and in this clip from his Comedy Central show Why? With Hannibal Buress, he convinces a little kid to say that Mike Dunleavy is better than Michael Jordan:

Granted, this kid is too young to have ever seen Jordan play — even for the Wizards. But it’s there: he says Mike Dunleavy is better.

Phil Jackson questions whether Duke players live up to expectations in NBA

2015 NBA Draft

The Knicks drafted Kristaps Porzingis with the No. 4 pick, and the early returns are positive.

But they also surely considered a couple players from Duke – Jahlil Okafor (who went No. 3 to the 76ers) and Justise Winslow (No. 10 to the Heat).

Would New York have chosen either? Knicks president Phil Jackson implies he had concerns simply because of their college team.

Jackson on Okafor, via Charlie Rosen of ESPN:

Jackson thinks he might not be aggressive enough. “Also, if you look at the guys who came to the NBA from Duke, aside from Grant Hill, which ones lived up to expectations?”

Let’s take a comprehensive look rather than cherry-picking players who could support either side of the argument.

We obviously don’t know yet whether Okafor, Winslow and Tyus Jones (No. 24 this year) will live up to expectations. Jabari Parker (No. 2 in 2014) looked pretty good last year, but he missed most of the season due to injury. It’s far too soon to make any judgments on him.

Otherwise, here are all Duke players drafted in the previous 15 years:

Lived up to expectations

  • Rodney Hood (No. 23 in 2014)
  • Mason Plumlee (No. 22 in 2013)
  • Ryan Kelly (No. 48 in 2013)
  • Miles Plumlee (No. 26 in 2012)
  • Kyrie Irving (No. 1 in 2011)
  • Kyle Singler (No. 33 in 2011)
  • Josh McRoberts (No. 37 in 2007)
  • J.J. Redick (No. 11 in 2006)
  • Luol Deng (No. 7 in 2004)
  • Chris Duhon (No. 38 in 2004)
  • Carlos Boozer (No. 34 in 2002)
  • Shane Battier (No. 6 in 2001)

Didn’t live up to expectations

  • Austin Rivers (No. 10 in 2012)
  • Nolan Smith (No. 21 in 2011)
  • Gerald Henderson (No. 12 in 2009)
  • Shelden Williams (No. 5 in 2006)
  • Daniel Ewing (No. 32 in 2005)
  • Dahntay Jones (No. 20 in 2003)
  • Mike Dunleavy (No. 3 in 2002)
  • Jay Williams (No. 2 in 2002)
  • Chris Carrawell (No. 41 in 2000)

That’s 12-of-21 – a 57 percent hit rate.

By comparison, here are players drafted from North Carolina in the same span:

Lived up to expectations

  • Harrison Barnes (No. 7 in 2012)
  • John Henson (No. 14 in 2012)
  • Tyler Zeller (No. 17 in 2012)
  • Ed Davis (No. 13 in 2010)
  • Tyler Hansbrough (No. 13 in 2009)
  • Ty Lawson (No. 18 in 2009)
  • Wayne Ellington (No. 28 in 2009)
  • Danny Green (No. 46 in 2009)
  • Brandan Wright (No. 8 in 2007)
  • Brendan Haywood (No. 20 in 2001)

Didn’t live up to expectations

  • Reggie Bullock (No. 25 in 2013)
  • Kendall Marshall (No. 13 in 2012)
  • Reyshawn Terry (No. 44 in 2007)
  • David Noel (No. 39 in 2006)
  • Marvin Williams (No. 2 in 2005)
  • Raymond Felton (No. 5 in 2005)
  • Sean May (No. 13 in 2005)
  • Rashad McCants (No. 14 in 2005)
  • Joseph Forte (No. 21 in 2001)

The Tar Heels are 10-for-19 – 53 percent.

Nobody would reasonably shy from drafting players from North Carolina, and they’ve fared worse than Duke players. Making snap judgments about Duke players just because they went to Duke is foolish.

Jackson is talking about a different time, when aside from Hill, Duke had a long run of first-round picks failing to meet expectations:

  • Roshown McLeod (No. 20 in 1998)
  • Cherokee Parks (No. 12 in 1995)
  • Bobby Hurley (No. 7 in 1993)
  • Christian Laettner (No. 3 in 1992)
  • Alaa Abdelnaby (No. 25 in 1990)
  • Danny Ferry (No. 2 in 1989)

Then, it was fair to question whether Mike Krzyzewski’s coaching yielded good college players who didn’t translate to the pros. But there have been more than enough counterexamples in the years since to dismiss that theory as bunk or outdated.

Count this as another example of Jackson sounding like someone who shouldn’t run an NBA team in 2015.

To be fair, the Knicks had a decent offseason, at least once you acknowledge they couldn’t land a star (which was kind of supposed to be Jackson’s job, right?).

The questions Knicks fans must ask themselves: Do you trust Jackson because of the moves he has made or worry about the next move because of what he has said?

Report: Bulls bringing back Mike Dunleavy on three-year deal worth $15 million

Mike Dunleavy, James Harden

Mike Dunleavy was a key member of a very good Bulls team last season, so much so that LeBron James was lobbying for the Cavaliers to go out and get him behind the scenes.

Cleveland is up against the cap, however, and will have very little to spend after James, Kevin Love and Tristan Thompson all get paid this summer. And with Dunleavy liking his fit in Chicago, he quickly agreed to re-up on a reasonable deal to remain with the Bulls.

Marc Stein of ESPN.com:

ESPN sources say Chicago Bulls are closing in on a three-year, $15 million deal to bring back in-demand swingman Mike Dunleavy

Dunleavy started in all 63 of his regular season appearances for the Bulls, and averaged 9.4 points and 3.9 rebounds in 29.2 minutes per contest. More importantly, he was an above average three-and-D guy, knocking down 40.7 percent of his shots from three-point distance while being a tough-minded defender who was never afraid to mix it up.

Really nice signing for the Bulls, especially at that price.

LeBron James wants Mike Dunleavy on Cavaliers, more likely gets Mo Williams

Charlotte Hornets v Indiana Pacers

LeBron James is playing a quaint little leverage game with the Cavaliers, where he will not talk about his next contract with them until they take care of his guy Tristan Thompson (they not so coincidentally have the same agent) and make some roster upgrades. What’s quaint is the notion of leverage — as if he is actually going to bolt Cleveland again.

But LeBron is making his voice heard. For example, he would like the Cavaliers to land Bulls sharpshooter Mike Dunleavy, reports Marc Stein of ESPN.

Except, nobody around the league thinks the Bulls are going to let Dunleavy get away. Unless some team comes in with a ridiculous, over-the-top offer the Bulls are going to pay Dunleavy to stay where he is — and he wants to stay with the Bulls. Just give Fred Hoiberg a chance.

But LeBron might get a new running mate on the wings, reports Chris Haynes of the Plain Dealer.

In case you lost track (and we can’t blame you if you have), Williams started the season in Minnesota and was traded to Charlotte for Gary Neal. Williams is still a solid NBA veteran player, one who averaged 14.2 points and shot 34 percent from three last season.

Williams could provide instant offense on the wing, the kind of depth and scoring the Cavaliers lacked in the Finals. He’s not going to be expensive. It’s a good pickup, one LeBron should be down with.

Even if it’s not Dunleavy.

Doc Rivers: If you knew the trades Donald Sterling killed “you would fall off your chair”

File of Clippers owner Sterling sitting as he watches team play Knicks in NBA game in Los Angeles

Clippers GM Doc Rivers has some work to do, because his offseason moves last summer tied the hands of Doc Rivers the coach come the playoffs. This is a team on the cusp, it just needs a couple pieces to be a scary contender.

Now Rivers feels he can go out and do that. He can follow his vision for team building. (Whether Lance Stephenson should be part of that vision is another question.)

Owner Steve Ballmer is writing the checks and giving Rivers freedom on the basketball side that owner Donald Sterling did not before. Here is what Rivers told the Los Angeles institution that is Fred Roggin (on the Beast 980 sports talk) about life under Sterling.

“This is really only my third year but you can make a case this is our second year if you know what I’m saying. If I someday wrote a book and told you a couple of the trades we had in the first year that we didn’t do because of other reasons, you would fall off your chair.”

Rivers should sit down with Mike Dunleavy and Elgin Baylor over some beers and swap stories on how Sterling killed smart plays, or let great free agents go, or just generally cut his basketball people off at the knees.

It never hurts to remember what a terrible sports team owner Donald Sterling was. He was (and is) and worse human being, but he was a wretched owner. Sterling killed trades that might cost the billionaire a little money, or traded away players he liked. Remember, one time his courtside seats, Sterling heckled Baron Davis — and Davis was his starting point guard.

And when you’ve got a person like Sterling as the owner who has a voice on roster moves, well, you get what you exepct.

Now, let’s move on from talking about him and start complaining about the Clippers new logo. As if that’s a real problem.