Tag: Mike Bibby

Miami Heat v New York Knicks - Game Four

Don’t look for Knicks to make many offseason moves, just big one


Before the first jump ball tipped off the season on Christmas, this was the season everyone thought the Knicks would take a step forward. Maybe only to the second round of the playoffs, but they were going to be good. At least the third best team in the East.

Instead, they had to fight their way into the seven seed, landed the Heat in the first round and got pushed aside pretty easily in five games.

It wasn’t always pretty. However, through the roller coaster of a season an identity and winning basketball emerged near the end. They played good defense, they ran the offense through Carmelo Anthony but there were shooters around him and it work. And for one playoff game ‘Melo and Amare Stoudemire worked together.

There are some Knicks fans looking for big changes — if ‘Melo and Amare don’t work then trade Stoudemire; bring in Phil Jackson to coach; go get Steve Nash.

I think you will only see the last thing on that list.

I believe the reports that the Knicks are in talks to make Mike Woodson the permanent coach. Woodson was 18-6 to close out the season, he is a college teammate of GM Glen Grunwald, he has the backing of Isiah Thomas who is whispering in owner James Dolan’s ear, and most importantly of all he has the support of Carmelo Anthony. Put simply, ‘Melo played hard for him where he would not for Mike D’Antoni. I still believe that Jackson does not want to return to the sidelines — not even for the Knicks job — and if Dolan can’t have him he’ll go with Woodson.

After that the core of the roster is basically set. Iman Shumpert is the starting two guard (once he returns from knee surgery), ‘Melo at the three, Stoudemire the four and Tyson Chandler the five. I don’t think they can move Stoudemire even if they wanted to (too big an uninsured contract) so Woodson needs to find a way to make him and ‘Melo work together. Jeremy Lin is a restricted free agent but he is a marketing cash cow for the team (plus a nice player) and they will not let him go. J.R. Smith may be gone and the bench needs to be filled out (expect Steve Novak and Landry Fields to be retained) but those are bench role players, the core starters are set.

Except they need a veteran starting point guard to go with them.

New York will go hard at Steve Nash. They can’t offer him a big contract (they are already over the salary cap) but they can say if he wants to contend he makes these Knicks a contender. Nash already lives in New York in the offseason.

The only question is one of fit — if you have the ball in Nash’s hands to set up the offense it is not in Anthony’s hands. And Anthony is only happy when the offense runs through him. Asking him to work off the ball while Stoudemire runs the pick-and-roll with Nash is how D’Antoni lost ‘Melo (just with a different point guard). You can still give Anthony the rock when Nash sits or call his number some trips down, but either way the fit can be strained.

However, this is Nash coming in, not Jeremy Lin or Mike Bibby. This is a two-time MVP. Woodson can push ‘Melo to share, and Nash’s three point shooting would provide spacing when Anthony does drive from isolation.

Nash can work in New York. It will take some sacrifices by everyone, but it can. If Nash decides to play elsewhere, look for the Knicks to go after Jason Kidd or try to trade for another veteran point guard. But Nash is the big fish, the one guy still playing at an elite level who might come for less money and be able to push this team forward.

It’s not a lot of changes — next season’s Knicks may look a lot like this season’s version. But there could be one change at the point and if so the Knicks become very interesting.

This summer in New York will be interesting either way.

Can Knicks be more than one-and-done against Heat?

Knicks' Anthony celebrates in the win over Heat in Game 4 of their NBA Eastern Conference basketball playoff series in New York

The last two games, the Heat did not bring their “A” game, and they still won one game against the Knicks and lost the other by two points. Conventional wisdom says Miami comes home Wednesday night, crank up the defensive pressure again and just run away and hide from the Knicks.

That could happen.

But the Knicks showed a few signs of life in Game 4, snapping their 13 game playoff losing streak. If all those things can repeat themselves and actually improve while away from Madison Square Garden the Knicks have a shot. Yes, I know the odds of that.

Here’s what has to happen.

• Mike Bibby has to play well. He’s the starting point guard, but really in name only — Carmelo Anthony has the ball in his hands most possessions, J.R. Smith will get some turns and Bibby will spend much of the game working off the ball. The Heat don’t fear him, as evidenced by Dwyane Wade’s comments (via the Sun Sentinel):

“We know Mike has made more shots in this series than he made all last year (with the Heat),” Wade said. “Send that to Mike.”

Bibby doesn’t have to do much, but when he does something he needs to be efficient — knock down the shot, don’t turn the ball over.

• Amare Stoudemire needs to have another big game. He was the unexpected boost for the Knicks in Game 4 — he was back from his hand’s run in with a fire extinguisher and really produced with 20 points and 10 rebounds. Even though he was one handed and couldn’t go left. This was the best Anthony and Stoudemire have played off each other in a long time and they will have to repeat and improve on that to win in Miami.

• Carmelo has to go off again. He had 41 on Game 4 and he’ll need similar numbers again. What I don’t get is why the Heat stick with Shane Battier as his defender most of the time — Anthony is shooting 52 percent against Battier this series. Anthony attacks and goes at the smaller Battier every time. Anthony likes isolation sets, LeBron is as good an isolation defender as there is in the league. Look for the Heat to be more aggressive in how they defend Anthony and he’s still going to have to produce.

We could from here get into a debate on how the last Miami Heat shot should be handled. But if Miami plays up to its potential, it can be Dexter Pittman because he’s in for garbage time. The Knicks need a lot of things to go right for them, they have no margin for error.

Reiterating what we already knew, Lin out for Heat series

Injured New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin reacts during pregame ceremonies before the Knicks play against the Miami Heat in Game 2 of their first round NBA Eastern Conference basketball playoffs in Miami

Yesterday, Knicks coach Mike Woodson said Jeremy Lin was very doubtful for Game 5 and it looked like some of the point guard duties for the Knicks would fall to Carmelo Anthony. And some to Mike Bibby.

So of course, Woodson had to be asked about it again on Tuesday, and this time he tried to close the door so he won’t get asked about it again on Wednesday. (Good luck with that, coach). Here is Woodson’s quote, via the AP.

“Speaking with medical and Jeremy, he will not play in this series,” Woodson said after practice.

I think it’s cute that Woodson acts like there might be a Game 6 in this series.

It’s all ending Wednesday night in Miami, likely in a very ugly fashion for the Knicks. The fact that Lin couldn’t play this series — along with Iman Shumpert, Amare Stoudemire and Baron Davis getting injured — sped the demise along and made the series less competitive. But the Knicks got a win in the playoffs, so consider that a step forward.

But Knicks fans will not see Lin on the court until next season.

With Baron Davis out, can Jeremy Lin return to help Knicks?

Knicks' Davis grabs his right knee after an injury in Game 4 of their NBA Eastern Conference basketball playoff series against the Heat in New York

When Baron Davis went down it looked bad. The video of the injury is at the bottom of this post but don’t watch it if you are squeamish.

Davis suffered a dislocated kneecap. He’s done for these playoffs and frankly this could be the sad end to his career (he will be 33 next season and his production was already in decline due to age and other injuries).

Davis’s kneecap leaves the Knicks in a tighter bind — and their bind was already plenty tight being down 3-1 to the Miami Heat. Davis was the starting point guard and without him the Knicks lean on Mike Bibby. The guy the Heat let walk at the end of the last season for nothing.

Of course, there’s always Jeremy Lin… if he is back from knee surgery and ready to go by Wednesday. Can he be? ESPNNewYork.com looked into it.

“He’ll get back into the gym (Monday) talk to the doctors about where he is physically,” (Knicks coach Mike) Woodson said. “We’ll make some decisions before we get on the plane and head to Miami.”

They have a few days, and smart money says Lin is on the plane to Miami with the team. But whether or not he can play remains to be seen.

Lin or no Lin isn’t going to swing the series to the Knicks. But he gives New York a fighting chance that Bibby and Toney Douglas — the other two point guards on the roster — do not. New York needs Lin back. We’ll see if they get him.

NBA Playoffs: Knicks compete early, but Heat roll late to take 3-0 series lead

Carmelo Anthony, LeBron James

The Heat took command of their first round playoff series with the Knicks, winning Game 3 in New York 87-70 to take a 3-0 lead in the best-of-seven series. Matt Moore and I discussed.

Matt Moore: Ugly, ugly, grotesque basketball Thursday and it looked like the Knicks could do the improbable without Amar’e Stoudemire, relying on Landry Fields and Mike Bibby. Don’t know how that plan failed.

LeBron just shut it down in the fourth. And for once, it was the other team! Just closed them out since he had so much energy. Wade’s third quarter, James’ fourth quarter, and maybe biggest, Mike Miller couldn’t hit, Shane Battier couldn’t hit, but Mario Chalmers could and did. If the Heat find one shooter a game to do that, they’re pretty much unstoppable. The Knicks did everything you can do and it still wasn’t nearly enough.

Brett Pollakoff: You always like to talk about whether or not a way a team wins (or is winning) is sustainable. Well, when the Knicks were leading in the second quarter by 11 at 40-29, what was the plan to get there? Let Miami start off the game up 9, then watch the Heat get bored and start jacking ill-advised three-pointers while you attack the paint to get easy looks, and finally, make sure the Heat go without a field goal for a stretch lasting almost 12 minutes?!

Yeah, definitely not sustainable.

Also, it didn’t hurt that LeBron played less than five minutes in the third due to foul trouble, which allowed him to play all of the fourth and score 17 (!) in the final period to finish things off.

So, two things: First, this was NOT a good game, and was nothing like the tough games in the 90s, right? Low-scoring and close does not equal interesting or exciting hard-nosed playoff basketball.

And second, how easily does the Heat win Game 4, having taken the (admittedly shorthanded and depleted) Knicks’ best shot?

MM: Horrible, awful game. The worst game I’ve seen since Game 7 of the 2010 Finals. Just terrible play, a lack of focus, bad shooting, needless fouls, a mishmash of movement. Sluggish and bad. I think it was like the 90’s, but only because I don’t overromanticize  bad basketball at any level.

I think the Knicks probably win Game 4. The Heat have no reason to let the Knicks win, should be able to coast, just have to not have a complete letdown. So naturally, they’ll let up. Also, two days in New York, with that crew of magazine-interview’in’, fashion-show-appearin’, mega-party-goin’ jokesters? No way the Heat come in fresh. Gentleman’s Sweep for the Heat. Let them win one, you know, to be polite. Melo is LeBron’s friend, after all.

How big was James though, in just choking the life out of New York down the stretch?

BP: I think the Heat got the excessive partying out of their system before this one, especially as evidenced by that first-half scoring drought. Besides, even if they hit the NYC club scene hard before Game 4, are the Knicks really able to do anything about it? Carmelo Anthony was 7-for-23, J.R. Smith was 5-for-18, and Steve Novak only attempted one three-pointer all night. As currently constructed, they simply don’t have the offensive weapons to hang with Miami for 48 minutes, and they certainly don’t have a point guard who can create easy, wide-open looks for the rest of the team.

(Seriously, Baron Davis is still out of breath after that and-1 drive in the first half, and might not recover until the offseason.)

LeBron coming out and scoring 11 straight Miami points to start the fourth was huge. Wade’s run in the third was equally important. A team like New York can’t stop these guys for an entire game, and the way the rest of the top teams in the conference are seeing players go down, Miami is going to have a much easier path to the Finals than expected.

Since the Knicks appear to be done, what do they need to improve upon before next season to actually win a game in the playoffs? In addition to not having their starting, $100 million power forward rip up his hand punching inanimate objects, of course.

MM: I’m not sure there’s much the Knicks can do. They’re flawed at their core. Melo and Amar’e doesn’t work. It was a bad plan conceptually from the start, and they’ve wed themselves to the player it’s harder to find a star to fit around. I’m sure James Dolan will spend some money trying though.

BP: I agree that Melo and Amar’e doesn’t work, but that doesn’t mean it can’t work. Sure, it would require a complete re-design of the offense from the top down, but the Knicks have a lot of money invested in those two, and I don’t see them being able to (or even wanting to) cut ties with either of them over the summer.

What’s clear, though, is that when the Knicks have everyone back healthy, they’ll need a creative, offensively-minded coach to make all of the pieces fit. Someone like Mike D’Antoni might be just the person to … Oh. Right.