Tag: mid-level exception

National Basketball Association commissioner David Stern, speaks after taking part in contract negotiations between NBA and players association in New York

Report: Owners could be open to minor system tweaks


If the owners and players sit down and talk before Wednesday’s deadline set by David Stern, the owners might be willing to make some tweaks to the system they have laid out.

The system has been part of the issue. Union president Derek Fisher has suggested he is willing to move more on split of league revenue (the union’s last offer was 51 percent to the players, down from 57 percent before, the owners want essentially 50/50), but they wanted concessions to keep the player movement and team spending system closer to what was in the last labor deal. The owners want both the money and system changes.

But apparently they’ll listen, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo.

As one ownership source told Yahoo! Sports on Monday night, “If there were a couple of tweaks needed around the edges – not fundamental deal points – I believe there could be a deal if everything else is agreed upon. But there needs to be a meeting with David and Billy for anything to happen.”

There has been talk of such a meeting, but nothing has yet been set. Which is ludicrous really, but then again this whole lockout has gotten ludicrous.

The system changes the players want would benefit the highest-spending teams — allowing teams paying the luxury tax to use sign-and-trade deals and have a full mid-level exception to use. In the past, teams like the Lakers and Mavericks — big spenders — have used the mid-level to bring in good role players to go around their stars. The sign-and-trade is a different matter, according to Zach Lowe at Sports Illustrated that has barely ever been used by tax-paying teams (five times total in the last six years, and Shawn Marion to the Mavs from Toronto is the only example you might recall, the rest were almost pure salary dumps). The sign-and-trades that seemed to freak out owners (LeBron James to Miami, Chris Bosh to Miami, Carlos Boozer to Chicago) would not be impacted because those teams were under the salary cap at the time.

All that said, talking system tweaks is moot if the two sides are not talking.

Report: Good news, the league and players agree on some things! Only, like, three, but still!


One of the things that Adam Silver and Peter Holt said at their press conference Thursday, in-between explaining their completely ridiculous obstinacy regarding the 50/50 split and looking like someone stole their 1992 Alonzo Mourning rookie card (I will never forgive that kid), is that federal mediator George Cohen starts his sessions by getting both sides to state the little things they agree on. It’s a baby-step kind of process. It shows you’re not completely and totally diametrically opposed at this point in the negotiation.

From the New York Times, we’ve learned a little bit about what it is that they’ve agreed upon. They’re things which will have a huge impact on how the league is run, even if both sides consider them microscopic compared to the big issues that lie ahead.

¶ There will be a one-time “amnesty” provision that will allow each team to waive a player (with pay) without his salary counting against the salary cap.

¶ There will be a “stretch” exception, available every year, allowing teams to waive players and stretch out their remaining salary over a number of seasons, thus reducing the annual salary-cap hit.

¶ The midlevel exception will be set around $5 million, a decrease of $800,000, but more than double what the owners were seeking.

via With N.B.A. Talks Halted, Sides Predict a Meeting Next Week – NYTimes.com.

The stretch exception is the biggest piece out of that. It means that owners will be able to get out of those terrible contracts that they give out. It also means that you’re going to see players making money from several teams in a season. That happens now, but it will increase. This could really help teams in the rebuilding process. If you’re laden with a huge contract you whiffed on, say… whatever the Blazers do next. The Blazers could then dump the player and stretch out the salary over a longer period of time, freeing them to overpay for someone else in the next free agency. Think of all the players the Blazers can overpay for!

In all seriousness, these measures provide a backbone for what the new league is going to look like. You know, eventually. When we have a season. If ever.

I’m going to go back to crying in this bottle now.

Report: NBA owners, players close to deal on mid-level exception

NBA And Player's Association Meet To Negotiate CBA

It’s progress. Not on the core issue that will bring us labor peace, but it’s progress. Right now, we’re not going to look askew at any sign of progress.

The NBA owners and players are very close to a deal on a reduced mid-level exception going forward, reports David Aldridge at NBA.com.

… a source who has been briefed on the discussions between the two sides said Monday afternoon that the sides are close to an agreement on one “system” aspect that has proven troublesome — a new, shorter mid-level exception for free agents.

This is a good thing — the players wanted some form of the MLE because it is good for the league’s middle class. It also may be the most abused of the exceptions, with teams making some horrible decisions to use it every year then being stuck with the consequences. An MLE that is shorter in length (it had a been a five-year max) and for less money works for both sides.

It’s progress.

It’s also a side dish, not the main course.

Until the two sides get anywhere on the split of basketball related income, it’s hard to be hopeful about anything. But at least they figured something out during five hours talking Sunday.