Tag: Michael Jordan

Jordan celebration Ehlo

Phil Jackson says “Jordan Rules” book helped Bulls win


Sam Smith is going to receive the 2012 Curt Gowdy Media Awards from the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame next week, honoring one of the great journalists ever to ply his craft following the NBA.

He covered the Chicago Bulls for years, for the Chicago Tribune and now for the Bull’s official site. He was the go-to source for Bulls information during the Jordan years, the one guy willing to be honest about the stars and team in a pre-Internet era.

But that’s not why you remember him, you remember him for The Jordan Rules.

That was the book that came out not long after the Bulls had won their first title and pulled back the curtain on Michael Jordan, a guy who up to then had not faced a ton of critical coverage (aside questions of if he could win the big one… seriously). The book exposed Jordan’s bullying ways with teammates in a less than flattering portrayal. It was controversial.

And Phil Jackson thinks it might have helped the Bulls win more titles.

While Jordan had taken some steps toward trusting his teammates he needed to take more if the Bulls were to become a dynasty and not a one-hit wonder. Jackson, speaking to Bulls.com about Sam Smith, said the book helped in that regard.

“I knew it was going to be controversial and Sam had kind of warned me,” said Jackson of The Jordan Rules. “It was an inside look at the team and about the dynamics and the characteristics of our leader, Michael Jordan. Not everybody was going to be happy with it, I knew that…

Between Jordan’s spectacular abilities and the emergence of Scottie Pippen, the Bulls were poised to make a long run. But without Jordan coming around to rely on his teammates, it is possible the Bulls would never have gotten to that point. Jackson believes Smith’s book played a role in Jordan backing off his so-called supporting cast, as well as allowing the coaches to more effectively restore a level of order and maintain control of the team.

“That was probably a part of the dynamic,” said Jackson. “There were a lot of things that contributed to that. I think one of them was Michael playing in a system in which he had to form-fit himself into a group. He had to start trusting his teammates, which came from the appreciation of their individual skills and abilities. Finally, some of the shine came off the idolatry and the unbelievable press Michael got his first four or five years of his career where he could do everything from sew to cook.”

Read the entire interview, it is fascinating. Smith started covering the team when NBA teams still flew commercial airlines (now teams have private chartered jets). That meant journalists were on the same team, got to talk to players in a casual setting, and got a better feel for team dynamics than now when media availability is limited (and team PR personnel are ever vigilant).

Jackson admits that a lot of what was in Jordan Rules rung true. And in the end, that might have been good for the Bulls.

Jordan, Magic to be presenters at Hall of Fame ceremony

Utah Jazz v Chicago Bulls

Presenters are a ceremonial part of the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame induction. They don’t actually do anything, but the ceremony calls for an already enshrined Hall of Famer to stand behind the inductee as he or she speaks about being inducted.

When Phil Knight — the founder of Nike — is enshrined next Friday night Michael Jordan will stand behind him.

When Reggie Miller and Jamaal Wilkes get their turn, Magic Johnson will be behind them.

The official list of presenters is out and you will see Celtics legend Bog Cousy (behind the person accepting for the late Don Barksdale), Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (behind Ralph Sampson and Wilkes) and Charles Barkley (behind Miller and Sampson).

I’d say it’s another reason to watch the induction ceremony, except they don’t speak or have any real role. But they will be there. And you can see them.

Jordan, Carmelo do some fundraising with President Obama


Just like you and I, the people around the NBA care who is president. And while you can’t draw hard and fast lines, a quick look at who donated to whom shows players pretty much lean Democratic and front office/ownership leans Republican.

Democrat Barack Obama used some of that player star power for a series of fundraisers on Wednesday. Michael Jordan, Carmelo Anthony, Patrick Ewing and others including David Stern were on hand for the events.

“It is very rare that I come to an event where I’m like the fifth or sixth most interesting person,” Obama joked at the Lincoln Center dinner.

The skills camp ($5,000 a head), autograph session then dinner Wednesday night reportedly raised about $3 million for Obama’s re-election campaign.

Then came the perks of being president — he changed out of his suit and along with actors George Clooney and Toby McGuire played some pickup hoops with the NBAers.

Of course, in today’s political discourse there must be a counter attack on everything. Because God forbid we just have a civil debate of the issues (both sides have attack dogs that do this, everyone is at fault). If you want to see the Republican attack from the Weekly Standard you can — they remind us that Jordan is a failed baseball player and try to link ‘Melo to a drug dealer. It all comes off as petty, selfish and childish to me, but then most of our political discourse does.

John Salley says Jordan not even his top 5 he played against


First, John Salley likes to say outrageous things on the radio. There’s a history of it.

Second, there is the fact that our personal views of history — particularly our personal history and stories — tend to be skewed by the things we choose to remember and focus on. Which is to say, for example, how you remember your high school years when you are 25 or 35 are not how your high school years were in reality.

Combine those to facts and you get John Sally on the ESPN’s Colin Cowherd show saying that Michael Jordan is not even in the top five players Salley ever played against. He puts Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Hakeem Olajuwon above Jordan on the all-time list. Even Kevin McHale is higher on Salley’s list. He thought Isiah Thomas was the best he ever played with — and he was on a Jordan Bulls team. Watch the video yourself.

I don’t want to get into the barstool debate about the GOAT. You can make an obvious and strong case for Jordan. I think Kareem tends to get shafted in this debate — maybe because he was aloof with the media, maybe because he was tall and we expect it of him, but he should be in the conversation. Magic was revolutionary. And we could go on and on about Wilt Chamberlain, Bill Russell and others.

I think what is going on here is Salley is a victim of his own memories, which are not always the most accurate of reflection of reality.

What Salley really remembers is a young, immature Jordan. He remembers the three years that the Bad Boy Pistons beat Jordan’s Bulls in the playoffs. The Pistons were the hurdle Jordan and his teammates needed to clear to get a title and Salley and his defense were a part of that. For years they had Jordan’s number.

But once Jordan and Scottie Pippen and the Bulls cleared that hurdle, they went on a run that blew the Pistons out of the water. Salley tends not to focus on the 1991 playoffs when the Bulls beat the Pistons, or even 92 when the Pistons were coming down and couldn’t get out of the first round. That’s when the Bulls were becoming the icons we know.

What Salley remembers is that the Lakers and Celtics of the Bird and Magic era were the Piston’s hurdle to clear to get a title. And so he reveres those he had to strive to reach, not as much those who came after trying to reach the Pistons heights. Before you rip Salley for this, we all do this in our own ways, and often with our own teams.

But there it is if you want it, John Salley saying some things that will make some of you mad.

After coaching LeBron, Jim Boeheim is not sure Jordan is the best he’s seen

London Olympics Basketball Men

The year of redemption for LeBron James is reaching dizzying heights now. NBA MVP, NBA champion, NBA finals MVP, gold medal all in one year. His arc is reaching the highest of heights.

And the praise keeps pouring in for him. Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim is stepping away from USA Basketball after serving as an assistant coach under Mike Krzyzewski for a decade. He has seen the evolution of LeBron from the guy Jerry Colangelo considered not inviting to Beijing to the unquestioned leader of the gold medal team in London.

Boeheim was on the Colin Cowherd show on ESPN Radio and his praise of LeBron went so far as to compare him to the guy currently on top of most “greatest ever to play the game” lists (via The Big Lead, who listens to Cowherd so you don’t have to).

“He’s a leader. He gets on the court, he tells people what to do … this guy can guard five [positions] … put him on anybody, he can guard him. I always felt Michael Jordan was the best player I’ve ever seen … I didn’t think it was close … and I’m not so sure anymore … this guy is 6-9, 260 pounds and he’s getting better … I know we’ve had great, great players through the years. He’s like Magic Johnson with Michael Jordan-type skills as well.”

LeBron has not near equalled Michael Jordan’s career accomplishments. Nobody sane suggests that he is. But he is starting to reach the full potential of his ridiculous talent and that might be compared with anyone.

The question was never LeBron’s talent. Physically on the court he has had the skills to be mentioned with Jordan and Magic since he set foot in the league. His game was always more Magic or Oscar Robertson than Jordan, but Jordan is the greatness benchmark for the next generations.

The question with LeBron has always been about the maturity and the competitive fire — he has never burned as hot as Jordan. Or Kobe. And in Cleveland LeBron still seemed to be about having fun and being around his guys more than winning. That’s at least how it looked outside his tight circle.

But he has evolved in Miami. Maybe it is he is now 27, no longer 21. Maybe it is Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, more serious minded guys. Maybe it is Pat Riley. Most likely it is a combination of all of it and more.

But for the past year LeBron has started to live up to his potential and the sky-high expectations on him. And those who are close to him to see what he has evolved into, even veteran guys like Boeheim, are taken aback by what he has become.