Tag: Michael Finley

San Antonio Spurs v Sacramento Kings

Michael Finley wants another shot in the NBA


Michael Finley was last seen as a bit player on Boston in the 2010 playoffs. He was unable to get floor time due to age and injuries and quietly faded into the sunset, right? Not so fast. HoopsHype spoke to the former Spurs champion who says that he wants to give it another go… now that he’s healthy.

Following up on the tweet, Finley told HoopsHype Friday that’s he’s feeling healthy now and ready to return to pro basketball – in the NBA or elsewhere. The 6-foot-7 last saw action during the Celtics’ Finals run one year and a half ago. Limited by ankle problems, he was little more than a bit player for the eventual NBA runner-up.

“When I went to Boston, my ankle wasn’t 100 percent,” Finley said. “So afer that season, I got my ankle worked on. I’ve been working hard to get that at 100 percent. I feel a lot better than during my time in Boston.

“With the lockout and the shortened season, I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s more injuries than usual since there’s been not much of a training camp. I’m just working hard to be in shape and prepared in case an NBA team calls me.”

via HoopsHype.com NBA Blogs – Jorge Sierra » Finley not done.

Finely is 38, will be turning 39 next spring. That’s a whole lot of miles on the former dunk champion and three-point shooter. That said, he’s always kept himself in good condition, and if Grant Hill can still be effective in this league, Finley can. It’s hard to see a team taking a shot on Finley, but considering the state of some of the contenders who have older players, it’s a slippery slope that could lead to Finley.

Setting aside his future prospects, can we talk about how good his 2004 season was? 17.4 points per game, 4 rebounds, 3 assists, 44 percent from the field, 40 percent from three, 17.8 PER, all at the age of 30. Finley’s one of those players who gets forgotten but who was a tremendous player in Dallas during the Nash-Nowitzki-Finley era and a crucial player in San Antonio for their championship runs. Guy’s a legend without the hype.

Still some big name free agents available, if you think they would help


NBA_iverson.jpgWe’re in the dregs of the NBA signing season, when guys who can contribute like Luther Head end up with make-good deals in Sacramento, where they will battle the undrafted for a roster spot.

But look at the names still unsigned and available (compiled by Ira Winderman at the South Florida Sun Sentinel):

Allen Iverson, Jerry Stackhouse, Joe Smith, Flip Murray, Earl Watson, Michael Finley, Larry Hughes, Bobby Simmons, Trenton Hassell, Jarvis Hayes, Ime Udoka and Devean George.

Each of those players come with questions, specifically questions about how much they can help in comparison to the costs.

The day has come when you’re name won’t get you an NBA roster spot. For the most part (there are exceptions). In an age of information and on demand NBA video and advanced statistics, general managers see the drop off in older players more quickly. In a cost conscious NBA, teams don’t want to get caught on the wrong side of the aging curve. Teams also are not going to take on marginal talent to fill the end of they bench when they can give that spot to a younger player who may develop.

Now if you want to play, you’ve got to be able to ball. And there are questions now about everybody on that list.

NBA Playoffs: Celtics still have championship recipe, even if they have to improvise on ingredients


Garnette_Game.jpgThe Celtics won it all two years ago, you know.

They were hungrier then, and healthier, too. James Posey-er, even. But that team, with a Rajon Rondo that wasn’t quite this impressive and absolutely depressing depth at center. Paul Pierce was more prolific then, Kevin Garnett was more productive then, Ray Allen was more consistent then. But for all the talk of how far this team has fallen since their championship season, would you like to guess how many spots they’ve dropped in defensive rating (points allowed per 100 possessions)?

Four. The Celtics went from the most intimidating defense in the league to simply being the fifth best, regardless of how their season numbers may be distorted by KG’s injuries.

There’s absolutely, positively no way that this team should be considered the favorite to win the title. In all honesty, their odds shouldn’t even be handicapped. That doesn’t mean that under the right conditions and with a few lucky breaks they couldn’t stumble their way to the top of the Eastern Conference and will themselves to the title.

The Celtics struggles this season are distinctly different from the Lakers, if only because L.A.’s problems seem rather self-imposed. They’re mental mistakes, effort issues, and admittedly a few injuries to go along with them. In Boston, there’s a lot of natural decline, but these guys still care. Paul Pierce still thinks he’s the best in the world, and this is his chance to prove it. Garnett still thinks that every piece of hardwood in the United States belongs to him, and you shouldn’t be able to set foot on it without him working you. Ray Allen is still be a brutally efficient three-point shooter, and can go white-hot for stretches at a time.

Boston’s season doesn’t speak for itself, because when the sample size is reduced (like it is in the playoffs, from 82 to, at most, 28), all kinds of odd results may unfold. All Boston needs to do is have a few productive stretches at the right times, and exploit their match-up advantages as they unfold. Doc Rivers never got enough credit for his coaching with the 2008 Celtics, but if Boston goes on any kind of extended run it will be a testament to not only his motivational ability, but his knowledge of the game’s X’s and O’s as well.

Then there’s Rajon Rondo. Rondo’s PER has jumped from 15.6 to 19.4 since the title run, and last year in the playoffs Rondo proved that regardless of his competition, he’s consistently one of the best players on the floor. He’s a defender capable of stopping a defense at its point of attack, and developed some impressive versatility in his ability to both score and set up his teammates. His drastic improvement since 2008 is something that’s largely overlooked, but making the jump from decent young point guard to legit All-Star is nothing to scoff at. Rondo can make a huge difference in any series on both ends of the court, and if he takes another step up like he did against Chicago in the playoffs last year? That’s fearsome.

Boston’s competition in the East is better than ever, but they’ll waltz into the postseason with zero external expectations. Don’t think for a second that they won’t be using that to their advantage. All Boston needs is to refine their focus, catch a few (insanely) lucky breaks, and show that they’re still capable of playing championship-caliber defense. All any team can ask for is a shot at this thing, and even though the Celtics may be taking a shot in the dark, it’s something.