Tag: Michael Beasley

Miami Heat v Toronto Raptors

Report: Heat to sign Michael Beasley for remainder of season


Michael Beasley has been a mixed bag for Miami the last 10 games. What else did you expect from the former No. 2 pick?

He’s played good defense — surprisingly — and been able to score pretty efficiently when he gets around the rim. However, his shot selection remains dubious. At best. He’s averaged 9.5 points a game but needed 9.9 shots a game to get there.

He’s gone through two 10-day contracts in Miami, and they are going to keep him, reports Ira Winderman of the Sun-Sentinel.

Beal has been averaging 22 minutes a game since joining the team, which speaks to Miami’s need for depth (especially with Chris Bosh out.

But this shot chart shows a guy the Heat may not want to lean heavily on in the postseason.


Alonzo Mourning doesn’t understand why LeBron James left Miami

Alonzo Mourning

LeBron James’ decision to go back to Cleveland in July rankled many in the Miami Heat organization, who couldn’t understand why he’d walk away from four straight Finals appearances and two championships. In an interview with SLAM, Heat legend and Basketball Hall of Famer Alonzo Mourning praised Pat Riley and the Heat’s cultural infrastructure and questioned James’ decision to leave.

SLAM: One of the really impressive things about the Miami Heat is how well the franchise takes care of its own. If you look at the moves the team’s made over the past half decade, whether it’s sticking with Coach Spoelstra when things were tough in the beginning, making sure to bring back DWade last summer, or even giving Michael Beasley another shot, Pat Riley shows so much love to guys who came up within the organization.

AM: That’s a Pat Riley thing. I think that’s the only way to do it, it really is. I think if you’re gonna be a consistent organization, you’ve gotta take care of your own people. You do. Every year, you can’t have turnover. First of all, Spo knows the culture—it’s just a matter of getting the guys to come in and buy into it. We had a great team for four years straight, and the reason why we had a great team was not just because we had the best player on the planet, it’s because we had the best team that bought into a culture. Everybody bought into this culture. After going to the Finals four years like that, I find it very difficult for individuals like we had to stop buying into the culture that got you four straight NBA Finals appearances. How do you stop buying into that? If you got there four years in a row, why not get back there four more times? And then four more times? Why not get back there 10 years in a row? It’s doable. And Pat Riley wasn’t gonna stop bringing pieces in to complement, you know? So why walk away from a dynasty?

SLAM: You gotta ask LeBron.

AM: [Laughs] Yeah. That’s the question. Why walk away from a dynasty when you have to go somewhere and rebuild, basically? Then you’ve got Kevin Love, who’s not happy at all. He’s outta there.

SLAM: It’s just different priorities, right? It’s the mindset that the NBA Championship isn’t everything, that there’s more to it than that.

AM: Evidently. It had to be. It’s very difficult to even think about walking away from something like that. How do you walk away?

That culture Mourning speaks of is exactly why it was difficult to imagine James leaving the Heat this summer, right up until he did just that. It was important for him to go home, and now that the Cavs are playing like title contenders, it looks like he made the right decision.

But it isn’t lost on James how important the Heat were to his growth. In his Sports Illustrated letter announcing his return to Cleveland, he likened his four years with the Heat to going to college in what it meant to his development. The organization has taken care of Mourning through years of health problems, and now they’re doing the same with Chris Bosh, who chose to return rather than take a better chance at a title with the Rockets.

Dwyane Wade ‘very’ disappointed in Hassan Whiteside after ejection vs. Celtics

Phoenix Suns v Miami Heat

Hassan Whiteside has been a great story for the Heat for most of this season, but the maturity issues that kept him out of the NBA for so long seem to be creeping back in at the worst possible time.

Miami is battling for the eighth and final playoff spot in the East, but Whiteside has been more of a distraction lately than the helpful player he’s been.

He was ejected from Monday night’s loss to the Celtics for a complete non-basketball play, and Dwyane Wade was among those who came down hard on him afterward.

From Jason Lieser of the Palm Beach Post:

Shortly after Whiteside’s ejection, Udonis Haslem (he was out with multiple injuries) stormed from the bench to the locker room. It is unknown why he went back there, but there is one obvious possibility.

Miami coach Erik Spoelstra, who appears to have been very patient with Whiteside since the team signed him early in the season, was clearly angrier about what happened Monday than Whiteside’s previous ejection.

Dwyane Wade went so far as to say there is nothing left for the veterans to tell Whiteside at this point. He has to figure this out himself.

Is Wade disappointed?

“Very,” he said. “We all are. As a Heat fan you are. In this locker room we are. Everybody. He’s gonna have to learn and he’s gonna learn the hard way. He’s doing it his own way. Hopefully he changes his mentality pretty quick.”

More from Wade, via Joe Goodman of the Miami Herald:

“He’s had enough veteran advice. There comes a time where you have to do it yourself. There’s only so many words people can continue to say to you. You gotta do it. Not for you, you got to do it for the other guys you see in here sacrificing — that you see out there playing hurt and all the things you see going on. You’re part of a team. You’re part of an organization.

“We all have our moments, selfish moments, but you can’t continue to keep having them because you got to be reliable, and you got to be able to be counted on. And right now, if he continues to act that way, then he’s not reliable.”

Whiteside was also ejected from a game against the Suns just one week prior to this latest incident.

The Heat see themselves as a family organization, and are willing to tolerate a lot from their players; Michael Beasley is a great example of that. We’ll see if that approach is able to reach Whiteside, who, with averages of 11 points, 9.8 rebounds and 2.4 blocked shots per game, has been an important part of the team this season.

Michael Beasley leaves Grizzlies for China

Memphis Grizzlies Training Camp

Michael Beasley signed a non-guaranteed contract with the Grizzlies, trying to earn Memphis’ final roster spot.

He’s given up that dream.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

When it comes to No. 2 pick busts, Darko Milicic played more seasons (10) than Beasley (6) before falling out of the NBA. Beasley, 25, could still return to the league while Darko is surely done, but that’s still not a good look.

Maybe Beasley got more money to go to China and this isn’t a sign of defeat. However, his Chinese salary won’t be pure profit.

Beasley was set to make $777,778 this season from the Suns, who released him last year. Phoenix can reduce its payments by half the difference between Beasley’s Chinese salary and $507,336 (NBA rookie minimum).

ProBasketballTalk 2014-15 Preview: Miami Heat

Chris Bosh

Last season: A fourth straight trip to the NBA Finals resulted in disappointment, as the Heat were steamrolled by the Spurs in five games. The ease with which Miami was dispatched was troubling, so much so that LeBron James re-signing — something most believed to be a foregone conclusion — was suddenly thrown into question. And as the team scrambled to show a willingness to improve by signing guys like Josh McRoberts and Danny Granger in the early days of free agency, the underwhelming nature of those additions ultimately saw James expedite his plan to return home to Cleveland to once again play for the Cavaliers.

Signature highlight from last season: It was tempting to go with the pair of alley-ops Dwyane Wade and LeBron James connected on in the Christmas Day win over the Lakers, because the way the two consistently got out on the break like this for easy buckets in transition during their four years together was about as signature as it gets. But with a nod to the upcoming season where James won’t be present, it felt fitting to go with Wade’s drive and dish to Chris Bosh for a game-winning three against the Blazers — a contest in which James sat out due to injury.

Key offseason moves:

Keys to the Heat season:

Life after LeBron: Having the game’s best player on the roster definitely has its advantages, and it isn’t something anyone in the Heat organization would choose to change about the last four seasons. But now that James has moved on, everything is immediately different on both ends of the floor. The continuity in place with Wade and Bosh being the team’s leaders, and with the highly competent Erik Spoelstra on the sidelines should ease the transition to a certain extent. But Miami will need to reinvent itself from an Xs and Os standpoint, and just how quickly the players get acclimated to those changes will largely determine their success, especially in the early parts of the upcoming season.

The health of Dwyane Wade: Wade was on a strict maintenance program last season to keep his knee from flaring up during the playoffs as it did the year prior, and that left him a gametime decision most nights. It was part of the reason he was limited to participating in just 54 regular season contests, and for the Heat to be successful in the post-LeBron era, they’re going to need a lot more than that out of Wade — not only in terms of minutes played, but also in terms of increased production. The good news for Heat fans is that Wade is planning on doing exactly that, but it’ll be interesting to see how he holds up while pushing himself to play more than he has in any of his previous three seasons.

The return of CB4: Chris Bosh is a perennial All-Star, but since coming to Miami, his numbers have dipped due to having to change his role, while sacrificing personal levels of production for the greater good of the franchise. Thankfully for the Heat, he has proven to be capable of doing so much more. In his final season in Toronto, Bosh averaged a career-high 24 points and 10.8 rebounds, and was unquestionably the team’s best player every single night. Bosh may have to return to his Raptors form for Miami to achieve postseason success, especially in light of Wade’s recent injury history — and he may be more ready than ever to do so.

Why you should watch: Wade and Bosh are still All-Star caliber players, and the addition of another one in Deng should make the Heat consistently competitive most nights. Spoelstra is one of the game’s top coaches at the professional level, and you can bet that he’s relishing the chance to lead his team to success in spite of the loss of Lebron James.

Prediction: With LeBron out of the picture, there are no longer championship expectations placed on this Miami team, which should be a weight off of their collective shoulders. The Heat can be in an underdog role for the first time in a long time, and there’s still more than enough talent in place to make a run at the postseason.

Miami is definitely a playoff team in the East, but is probably not deep enough to claw itself into one of the three top spots in the standings. A ceiling of fourth place in the conference feels about right, with an opportunity to surprise someone in the first (and possibly second) round of the playoffs if Wade, Bosh and Spoelstra find a way to have things clicking by the time the regular season is finished.