Tag: Miami Heat

Goran and Zoran Dragic 02/21/2015

Celtics waive Zoran Dragic, who plans to return to Europe

Leave a comment

Two weeks ago, the Heat traded Zoran Dragic (brother of Goran) to the Celtics along with a future second-round pick. The Heat wanted to save money, and the Celtics picked up an asset in the deal. Now, to the surprise of no one, the Celtics have waived the younger Dragic. They announced the move in a press release:

The Boston Celtics announced today that they have waived guard/forward Zoran Dragic.

Dragic, a 6’5” guard/forward, was originally acquired by the Celtics along with a future second round pick and cash considerations from the Miami Heat on July 27, 2015. He appeared in 16 games split between the Phoenix Suns and Miami Heat during the 2014-15 season and averaged 1.8 points in 4.7 minutes per game over that span. He posted a season-high 22 points on 9-17 (.529) shooting from the field, three rebounds, two assists and two steals in 41 minutes of action against the Philadelphia 76ers on April 15, 2015.

ESPN.com’s Marc Stein tweets that Dragic plans to return to Europe, where he will be able to get more consistent minutes than he would have in the NBA:

When the Heat traded Zoran to the Celtics after maxing out Goran, it was the second move this summer that broke up a pair of brothers who had been teammates. But unlike the Morris twins, who by all accounts are extremely unhappy to be separated, all indications are that Goran is happy with this move. His brother wants a bigger role and more minutes, and he’ll get that overseas. Good for him.

Rudy Gobert throws shade at Team USA for excluding Derrick Favors

Minnesota Timberwolves v Utah Jazz

USA Basketball announced its expected minicamp attendees, prompting one major Utah Jazz question:

Where’s Trey Burke?

Turns out, Team USA had a late change of heart and invited Michael Carter-Williams instead. Simple enough.

But Jazz center Rudy Gobert wondered about a different Utah teammate:

That Derrick Favors didn’t make the 34-player camp speaks to the Americans’ depth. None of these players are headed to Las Vegas:

  • Kyle Lowry
  • Paul Millsap
  • Jeff Teague
  • Danny Green
  • Zach Randolph
  • Eric Bledsoe
  • Greg Monroe
  • Khris Middleton
  • Hassan Whiteside
  • DeMarre Carroll

That list doesn’t even include players like Damian Lillard and Derrick Rose, who chose not to attend. The U.S. is just loaded with talent.

It’s not hard to argue Favors should have been invited over some players who were. But try making the case he belongs on the final 12-man Olympic roster. That’s practically impossible, making this snub mostly academic.

But if Gobert wants to cape for his teammate, that’s just great.

Gerald Green talks about embarrassment, getting past losing part of ring finger on right hand

Denver Nuggets v Phoenix Suns

It’s a story we’ve talked about before at PBT: When Gerald Green was in sixth grade, he was playing hoops on a makeshift rim on top of a doorway, while wearing his mother’s class ring. Green went up to dunk, the ring caught on an exposed nail, and it ripped the flesh off his finger down to the bone. The doctors had to amputate his ring finger on his right hand at the middle knuckle.

It’s as bad as it sounds.

Green was able to overcome that to become a future first-round NBA draft pick out of high school, win the NBA All-Star Dunk Contest, and have an eight-year NBA career (with a couple of seasons playing in Russia in the middle). That will continue this season with the Miami Heat.

Despite all that, it took a long time to get over the embarrassment of losing that finger, something Green talked about with Ira Winderman of the Sun Sentinel.

…when selected in the first round of the 2005 NBA draft by the Boston Celtics, came a moment of truth. “If you go back and look at the David Stern tape,” he said during a private moment Thursday about meeting the NBA commissioner, “when I go shake his hand I have my right hand in my pocket. He tells me, ‘Take your hand out of your pocket.’

“I always have been a little shy about that. But I think it’s getting better once I get older. I just want to be able to inspire people with that…

“I think what really hurt me were the aftereffects,” he said, “the getting made fun of, scared to talk about it because I was so ashamed of it, or always hiding my hand in my pocket.

“That was the thing that I had to go through. And as a little kid, obviously kids like to make fun of you because you have this or that. It was something I went through. But it taught me to be who I am today.”

The image of an NBA player in high school is he is the cool kid, the BMOC, the guy every other guy wants to be and every girl wants to be with. For some, that is the reality. But for some it is different — NBA players have had their difficult adjustments through their teenage years (they tend to be tall and awkward), just like the rest of us. The Lakers’ Roy Hibbert talked about that and his battles with depression openly recently.

If Green can use his story to help inspire some youth to accept who they are and face their challenges, then all the better.