Tag: Miami Heat

LeBron James

While NBA rumors fly in wild ride, LeBron James plays patient game


It’s only been five days. We’re just starting Day 6.

That’s how long we have been in this NBA free agency period (it feels like three weeks, but it just started July 1). Six days is too fast to expect even Pat Riley to have pulled off a miracle, or to have rebuilt key parts of the Heat’s roster. We’re not at the point yet where most players will take a discount, they are still dreaming big.

Six days is far faster than LeBron James needed to make a decision. And he knows it. So he hasn’t.

In today’s constant news cycle/social media landscape opinions — and the emotions of fan bases — swing on droplets of news. Especially where it concerns LeBron because he swings the balance of power with him — whatever team he plays for is instantly a contender. Other players will come there. He brings that kind of power.

But clearly the man is in no rush to use it. He went on vacation right as free agency started and has another one planned within a week.

Why should he be in a rush?

The message he sent to Pat Riley about improving the roster got through and is still hangs over the Heat, forcing actions. LeBron can let his agent sort through potential Plan B options, to meet with other interested teams. LeBron can even sit down this week with a handful of those other suitors.

And then still not make an instant decision.

Would LeBron like to get this wrapped up before he heads to Brazil to watch the World Cup final? I’m sure he would. That’s different from real pressure to get a deal done — what real pressure is on him to make a fast decision? Other teams may get frustrated with the waiting, so what?

Right now the pressure is on Riley, but he is caught in a vicious cycle — quality free agents don’t want to commit to the Heat until they know LeBron is on board, LeBron doesn’t want to be on board until some more quality players are.

Then there is the money issue — Riley doesn’t know exactly what he can spend. That’s thanks to LeBron, Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade not giving Riley firm numbers to go by. Our own Aaron Bruski reported that contenders speaking to Isaiah Thomas were giving him a $6 million to $7 million starting number. Other free agents were told the starting salary was $5.5 million, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports, although the Heat talked of trying to make a sign-and-trade deal. Luol Deng and the Heat spoke but could only go so far because there are no solid numbers, reports David Aldridge of NBA.com.

Those are strikes against the Heat, but every potential landing spot has its own big strikes, especially for a guy such as LeBron who wants to win instantly. The Cavaliers roster is talented but very, very green and untested (plus there is some ugly history with the last exit). In Houston, can two ball dominant wing players — LeBron and James Harden — share the ball, plus get Dwight Howard enough touches? In addition the Rockets are in the West and any trip to the West is a much tougher road to the Finals. In Los Angeles it would still be seen as Kobe Bryant’s team, plus that roster is a long, long way from contending. The Bulls can’t offer a max contract like LeBron wants. The Suns have cap space and a nice core, but if LeBron wants to play for an owner really willing to spend does he trust Robert Sarver? The list goes on and on, there is no easy, clean answer for LeBron, especially since moving again to chase a ring likely leads to another public backlash (even if it is Cleveland).

So he can be patient. Let the suitors tweak their rosters and make their pitches. All the while Pat Riley keeps pulling things together to round out the Miami roster. LeBron can sit back and let it play out much longer.

And all the while, the NBA rumor mill will just keep on cranking. Droplets of information will produce wild swings, at least until LeBron reaches an actual answer.

NBA’s best urged to take less “if they want to win.” Agents, unions unhappy with trend.

LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Tyson Chandler

Just how badly did the owners smack down the players in the latest Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA)? Take these now regular comments as examples:

“If Carmelo Anthony really cares about winning he will take less money.”

“LeBron James demanding the max shows he only cares about himself, not the Heat.”

“Dirk Nowitzki showed he cares more about winning by taking that Tim Duncan-sized contract.”

In the last CBA negotiations the players went from receiving 57 percent of the league’s income down to 50 percent — that’s an estimated $350 million a year going from the players straight to the owners’ pockets. At the same time NBA owners are seeing the value of their franchises skyrocket ($2 billion for the Clippers from Steve Ballmer) and there is a new television deal coming in two years that is going to flood the owners with more cash.

Yet it is the players that are asked to sacrifice “if they care about winning.”

It was a complete and total rout by the owners two years ago at the negotiating table. The Christians had more success against the lions in the Colosseum.

As you can imagine, agents and representatives of the players’ union do not like this “take less” trend. A couple spoke to Sean Deveney of the Sporting News about it.

“Why is it that our best players should be getting less than they’re worth?” one union official told Sporting News. “We have a collective-bargaining agreement that already limits what star players can make, and limits the total amount teams can pay. We have a very tough luxury tax. And now you have teams publicly shaming their best players into a bigger cut?”

“It’s just ridiculous,” one agent told SN. “There is this whole brainwashing thing going on and teams are selling it to their fans that this player or that player should take less, that they would not take their money if they truly cared about winning. That’s BS. If you want to win, you’re the owner, go over the tax line.

“This is the CBA you wanted, this is what the owners wanted. Why does the money come out of the players’ pockets? The players just gave back a huge amount in the CBA. But, no, that’s the brainwashing — that the players are the bad guys if they try to get what the CBA says they should get.”

LeBron is getting criticism for exactly that stance — the Heat amnestied Mike Miller simply to save money last season (don’t let Pat Riley spin it another way, they could have done it this summer) and LeBron wants Micky Arison to spend. Part of what LeBron is doing now is making his point to Heat management. He wants to win and as his new contract, even at the max, is half (at most) of what he’d make on a true open market so he wants the owner to show he is committed to spending to win too. (And you think LeBron is going to get Robert Sarver to do that in Phoenix?)

The problem comes back to just how much the owners dominated the last CBA. As Mark Cuban has ranted more than once, being into the tax is more than just a money issue, the new CBA limits teams flexibility to make moves once their salary is up in the tax range — smaller mid-level exception, no sign-and-trades, and more. You can’t build a team the same way and GMs want that flexibility.

It’s not fair to the top players, but you had to know that many fans would side with management, because they pretty much always do. We don’t relate to what even an average NBA player makes, but we know we want our team to win. So the star player gets the pressure and too often to make that happen while the owner gets to skate.

Agents and union members may not like it, they can fight to change it, but it’s not going to change. They can tune it out as LeBron is doing, but the calls for players to take the hit aren’t going away.

Report: Sixers, Bucks likely landing spots for Jeremy Lin if Rockets pull trigger

Houston Rockets v New York Knicks

Whether it is Carmelo Anthony (not very likely) or Chris Bosh (still not likely) or Pau Gasol or Luol Deng or anyone else of note, the Houston Rockets need to clear out more cap space to make the signing.

Having already moved Omer Asik, next up was trying to find a home for Jeremy Lin, finding a team where the Rockets can ship him and get no salary back (just picks or a player who can be waived).

That appears to be the Philadelphia 76ers. Or maybe the Bucks. That according to Marc Stein at ESPN.

Sources told ESPN.com that the Sixers, who have ample room on their payroll to absorb Lin’s contract, have emerged as a leading contender to take on Lin in a trade that sends no salary back to the Rockets, which would enable the Rockets to extend a rich offer in free agency to either Carmelo Anthony or Chris Bosh.

Sources say that the Milwaukee Bucks are another team that would consider trading for Lin if the Rockets add a sweetener or two to the deal for the privilege of shedding Lin’s contract to a team that can comfortably absorb it.

Why would the Sixers do this? A future first round pick. They are rebuilding and GM Sam Hinkie is a pick hoarder. They get a backup point for a year (who they can use as a trade asset down the line) but mostly it’s about the pick.

Just something to watch. First, the Rockets need to land that star free agent to need the space. There has been a lot of flirting at the bar that is very different from going home with someone.

Report: Heat president Pat Riley to meet with Luol Deng in Chicago

Cleveland Cavaliers v Dallas Mavericks

The Miami Heat may be starting to sweat just a little bit now that we’re five days into free agency, with LeBron James having long since opted out of the final two years of his deal, and it appearing more and more likely that he’s seriously considering other options.

The pressure is increasing by the moment for the Heat to come up with a plan to upgrade the roster by adding some free agent talent, and the early contracts that have been given out to guys like Kyle Lowry and Avery Bradley might mean that the market will be more expensive than anticipated originally.

But Heat president Pat Riley is pressing on, and has plans to meet with at least one high profile free agent on Saturday.

From Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Miami president Pat Riley plans to meet with free agent Luol Deng in Chicago today, league source tells Yahoo.

Deng is a two-time All-Star and an unrestricted free agent who played nine full seasons with the Bulls, before being traded to the Cavaliers midway through his 10th in a move made strictly to dump salary. He’s a capable two-way player who would provide much-needed depth and production on the wing, especially in light of Dwyane Wade’s durability questions over the long grind of the regular season.

The problem for Miami is that Deng isn’t believed to be willing to take a significant pay cut just to play alongside James, Wade and Chris Bosh, and while it’s unclear just how much cap space the Heat will have to spend once those three restructure the finances of their next deals, Deng would appear to be out of the team’s price range.

But Riley has always been known as a master motivator, and as the team gets more desperate to improve, he may be able to come up with the right combination of dollars and sense to convince Deng that signing with the Heat, even for less than market value, is ultimately what’s best.

Report: Bosh would prefer a four-year max deal with another team to staying with Heat for less

Chris Bosh

The longer the LeBron James situation drags out, the more we’re going to continue to hear rumblings about Miami’s Big Three being broken up, with those players pursuing what would certainly be lucrative options elsewhere.

While the Heat remain the most likely destination for James to end up, it does seem for the first time that his leaving to go somewhere else is a real possibility.

If that were to happen, teams would be lining up to try to poach Chris Bosh, who is a legitimate All-Star talent that would command no less than a four-year max contract on the open market. In fact, he may now prefer that to taking less money to stay in Miami on a new deal that might lock him up for the next five years.

From Ken Berger of CBSSports.com:

Bosh possibly going to the Rockets (or to the Lakers or Mavs) proves why the notion of Bosh taking a $10 million pay cut to stay in Miami was never realistic. With the Bulls, Rockets, Mavs, Lakers, Cavs, Suns and potentially others chasing James, Anthony or both, there are more teams than there are LeBrons and Melos (only one of each). Once James and Anthony have made a decision, the teams that lost out will be lining up to create a market for Bosh.

Thus, with James waiting for Heat president Pat Riley to revamp the roster and with Dwyane Wade leaving $42 million on the table at age 32, Bosh is the member of the Big Three most likely to break away. Multiple league sources say there will be a close-to-max market for Bosh if Anthony and James stay with their respective teams. One of those people, an executive with a rival team, said the growing belief around the league is that Bosh would prefer a four-year max deal with another team to a discounted longer deal with Miami.

Any deal that Bosh and LeBron sign to stay in Miami would likely be very similar to their last ones, which included early termination provisions after the first three years. So, if James does return and Bosh agrees to take less in the first couple of years of a new contract, he’ll have the option of either collecting the rest near the end of it, or simply opting out to secure a more lucrative deal when that time comes.

Bosh has said more than once that he doesn’t want to leave Miami. But if the unexpected happens, and LeBron bolts in free agency, it would be easy to see Bosh doing the same — for max money, and without having to deal with the decision of whether or not to take a discount.