Tag: Miami Heat

Shabazz Napier, Peyton Siva

Shabazz Napier alley-oop to James Ennis, this could be Miami’s offense next season (VIDEO)


This will either be the garbage-time sideshow for Miami next season, or the lone bastion of hope for the future of what remains of Heat fans. It all depends on what LeBron James decides.

Either way, it’s pretty entertaining.

That’s rookie Shabazz Napier throwing the lob to rookie James Ennis. (If you don’t remember Ennis, the Heat traded to get him deep in the second round of the 2013 draft out of Long Beach State, he played this past season in Austrailia and had a monster year. He’s looked like a nice “3 and D” guy in Summer League so far, like the kind of guy the Heat could have used last year.)

Either way, these guys could be a couple reasons to tune into Heat games next season. That and Josh McRoberts.

Phil Jackson says he has not heard from Carmelo, has tried to recruit Gasol

Phil Jackson

It’s not just you, Phil Jackson is waiting, too.

Carmelo Anthony met with five teams last week and took the long holiday weekend to mull over his free agency decision, with announcement expected Monday… but nothing. It’s now heading into Thursday night and still nothing, outside a reports it’s down to the Knicks and Lakers.

There are reports Anthony will stay in New York and Jackson said he is optimistic, but if you want something official, sorry.

Jackson spoke to the New York media Thursday and had a “no update” update on free agency, as tweeted by Chris Herring of the Wall Street Journal.

Jackson has made moves, trading Tyson Chandler and Raymond Felton to both save money and get triangle-friendly Jose Calderon at the point. He also has reached out to Pau Gasol.

Gasol has options, too — the Lakers, Bulls, Spurs, Thunder and even Heat have reached out to him.

But Gasol is waiting to see what LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony will do before making his decision.

Like the rest of us. Including Phil Jackson.

People gathering at LeBron’s house in Ohio because… I got nothing


LeBron James is not at his home in Bath, Ohio, outside his native Akron (not far from Cleveland). LeBron is in Las Vegas for his skills camp and is going straight from there to Brazil for the World Cup Final because if you’re LeBron you can. His family is not in Ohio, either.

[ RELATED: Cavs claim they tried to remove Dan Gilbert’s LeBron James letter years ago ]

Yet people are gathering at his home in Bath — and police are now there to keep the situation calm — as Twitter and internet rumors swirl that an announcement on LeBron’s future is coming tonight. Rumors without much behind them, but it doesn’t matter. People are showing up at the empty house because…

I got nothing. But here is the proof, via Jon Bozeka of Mary Kilpatrck.

[ MORE: An interesting rationale for predicting LeBron James to the Cavs ]

Free agency signing period opens: Spencer Hawes, Marcin Gortat among first to put ink to paper

via @MGortat

While free agency in the NBA has been in full swing since July 1, players and teams could only reach agreements up until now. Handshake deals.

Starting July 10 those handshakes turn into signed contracts.

Here is a list of who signed where, as of now (these are not rumors, just done deals with ink on paper). We will continue to update this list as deals get announced.

• The Cleveland Cavaliers have made announcement — Kyrie Irving has officially signed his max five year extension. What, you were expecting something else?

• The three-team Cavaliers trade that frees them up enough money to give LeBron James a max contract has gone through, the Cavaliers announced. Brooklyn gets Jarrett Jack and Sergey Karasev, the Celtics get Tyler Zeller and the Cavs’ 2016 first round pick (top 10 protected), while the Cavaliers get cap space as well as Boston’s 2015 second round pick (top 55 protected) and the rights to Ilkan Karaman and Edin Bavcic.

• Chandler Parsons was hanging out in a club with Mark Cuban and some other random guys, and signed the paperwork on his offer sheet with Dallas. Got to love that Cuban did that in a club. The two sides talked sign-and-trade for a while but that fell apart and the Rockets now have the offer sheet in hand. That means the clock is ticking at 72 hours to match — if they want to sign Chris Bosh and match Parsons the Rockets have a lot of moves to make very quickly (and they need LeBron to make his decision sooner rather than later).

• Steve Blake and Chris Kaman have both left the Lakers to sign with the Trail Blazers.

• Spencer Hawes and Jordan Farmar formally signed their deals to join the Los Angeles Clippers — Hawes gets the full mid-level and four years, $23 million, Farmar signs for two years and $4.2 million total, with a player option for the second year. But really the best part of this is the shorts Hawes wore to the signing.

• Marcin Gortat also put ink to paper on a five-year, $60 million deal.

• Kyle Lowry formally re-signed with the Toronto Raptors and will speak to the media Thursday.

• Gordon Hayward formally signed a three-year, $46 million offer sheet with a player option the third year with the Charlotte Hornets. The Jazz have 72 hours to match and are expected to do so.

Mavericks give Rockets Chandler Parsons offer sheet

Oklahoma City Thunder v Houston Rockets

Update: I guess the Mavericks didn’t need until midnight.

Sam Amick of USA Today:

If Parsons’ contract is accurately reported and my math is correct, this means the Dirk Nowitzki signing is official.


Chandler Parsons and Mark Cuban might have celebrated prematurely last night.

Though Parsons and the Mavericks have reportedly agreed on terms to an offer sheet, they haven’t yet officially submitted it.

Parsons has probably signed it. There’s even video of him doing so in the club:

But Dallas hasn’t yet submitted it and started the Rockets’ 72-hour clock.

Dwain Price of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram:

Why the delay?

Daryl Morey is already pressed for time. He must salvage the Omer Asik trade, finalize the Jeremy Lin trade – all to convince Chris Bosh to accept less than a max offer.

By holding off, the Mavericks are essentially doing Houston a favor. Why would they do that?

I see two non-mutually exclusive possibilities.

1. A sign-and-trade is on the table.

Mavericks general manager Donnie Nelson acknowledges that’s a possibility:

The Mavericks obviously value Parsons a lot. They’re willing to pay him all that money. But do they value him enough to also relinquish an asset to ensure they get him? At some point, Parsons’ production doesn’t warrant the cost.

From the Rockets’ perspective, taking back anything more than small contracts could interfere with their pursuit of Bosh. Maybe they can snag draft picks from Dallas, but see the previous paragraph.

I can’t rule out a sign-and-trade, but there are major roadblocks.

Once Parsons signs an offer sheet, a sign-and-trade is no longer possible. It behooves Morey to prolong sign-and-trades negotiations, giving himself more time to handle everything else on his plate.

2. The Mavericks can’t yet offer Parsons his promised money.

How much is Parsons guaranteed over his three-year contract? I’ve seen slightly different numbers.

Marc Stein of ESPN called it “in excess of $45 million.” Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports said “$46 million.”

We’re in the range of Parsons’ max contract, which would be $46,228,710. I’m sure rounding factors in these reports, but I have yet to see someone credibly call Parsons’ offer a “max offer.”

Anyway, prior to agreeing to terms with Parsons, Dallas reached a three-year, $30 million deal with Dirk Nowitzki and agreed to re-sign Devin Harris. Most reports list Harris’ contract as worth $9 million over three years. Price has it $12 million over three years. For now, I’ll go with $9 million.

If Nowitzki’s and Harris’ contracts are fully back-loaded, the Mavericks could offer Parsons $44,413,545. If they take the relatively painless step of renouncing Petteri Koponen – the No. 30 pick in the 2007 draft who has yet to play in the NBA – they could increase their Parsons offer to $45,680,286.

That’s right in the range of what has been reported.

However, that requires Nowitzki to sign his contract first. Signing him with bird rights is the only way he can get 7.5 percent, rather than 4.5, raises. If the Mavericks renounce Nowitzki to sign Parsons first, even with renouncing Koponen, they could offer Parsons only $44,805,401 while preserving enough room to give Nowitzki his promised $30 million.

In other words, the Mavericks must wait to finalize Nowitzki’s contract before submitting Parsons’ offer sheet. In the real world, that could take time. Nelson confirms Nowitzki has yet to sign:

And if Harris’ promised contract is actually $12 million, forget about it. Drop Parsons’ three-year salary to $42,545,286. That would mean either the reports on Parsons’ salary are really off, or the Mavericks must make other moves. I figure they’d have those contingencies arranged before offering Parsons, but they also might be giving themselves an extra day to seek better trades for their expendable players (Raymond Felton, Brandan Wright,Jae Crowder,Ricky Ledo

and Gal Mekel) than would already be in place.

If Harris is getting only $9 million, though, that aspect isn’t a worry. Officially signing Nowitzki first matters, though.

So, once the Mavericks get all their ducks in a row, then what?

Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle:


The Rockets must figure out how everything comes together. Tonight, Dallas will likely put them on the clock to do so.