Tag: Miami Heat Superteam

Utah Jazz v Dallas Mavericks

Jazz coach Corbin says blame AAU for the Miami Heat


You heard it right after LeBron James talked about where his talents were going — other older players jumped up and said they would not have done this. They would not have willingly joined forces with other superstars to chase rings.

Former NBA player and current Jazz coach Tyrone Corbin gets that.

He told the Deseret News the culture is different than when he played and says AAU basketball — the traveling high school All-Star teams that play through the summer — is the reason.

“Just thinking back in the day when I was younger in the league, superstar guys wanted to have their own show. It’s changed,” Corbin said. “These kids they grew up in AAU, being on all-star teams, and they’re used to playing with superstar guys. And they want that kind of team because … they have a chance to win big every night. They want to win championships and not have to be the only guy getting it done.”

Added Corbin: “I think it’s a change for this new generation of kid who’s used to being on these superstar teams from the AAU thing.”

So if you hate the Heat, blame AAU basketball. Which is fine, AAU gets blamed for a lot of things (the deterioration of fundamentals among younger players, isolation basketball, the lack of a midrange game in the NBA, global warming).

Also know what AAU spawned and what LeBron James did this summer resonates through the Collective Bargaining Agreement negotiations. Small market owners see what happened with Miami, what Carmelo Anthony did with Denver, and they want their control back. (If they ever had it, but that’s another story.) You see Utah trading away Deron Williams before he can even think about becoming a free agent because they believe they can’t keep him after his deal is up. Small and middle-sized market owners want the ability to keep their stars, and that is going to be a big part of the subtext of the CBA talks.

Miami’s Pat Riley, Chicago’s Gar Forman co-Executives of Year

Miami Heat President Pat Riley smiles following a preseason workout of the  NBA basketball team at Hurlburt Field Air Force Base near Fort Walton Beach

The executives who orchestrated the two biggest turnarounds in the NBA this season — Pat Riley of the Miami Heat and Gar Forman of the Chicago Bulls — will share the NBA’s Executive of the Year award.

Well, privately they probably share this about as well as two 3-year-old girls in a room with one Princess Ariel doll. But publically they will say nice things. And Riley got screwed in this vote, but we’ll get to that in a bit.

There were 30 votes from team executives (you can’t vote for yourself, insert your own Riley joke here) and both Forman and Riley got 11 votes. John Paxson of the Bulls finished third (we assume one of his votes was from the Clippers, who would like to choke Vinny Del Negro themselves).

Riley got robbed here.

Make no mistake, Forman did a fine job, he brought in coach Tom Thibodeau, which was the biggest step in the turnaround of the team. Well, that and drafting Derrick Rose, which was lottery luck. Forman also brought in Carlos Boozer and filled out the rest of a good Bulls roster.

But Riley… look, you may love to hate the Big Three, but to pull that off was a brilliant and ballsy move. He had to take huge risks, clear out loads of cap space, convince everyone to go with the plan, get them all to sign for less so that Udonis Haslem and Mike Miller could be brought in. (Okay, so Miller proves he’s not perfect.)

Riley lapped the field as executive of the year. That he didn’t win shows how other executives around the league feel about him more than anything. Watching his team jell the last couple weeks, Riley doesn’t care what they think.

Are the Miami Heat the NBA’s Green Bay Packers?

Washington Wizards v Miami Heat

It’s national “Pile on the Miami Heat Week” after Sunday’s loss to Bulls. Somehow, one of the NBA’s best teams has become seen as a crying, soft collection of overpaid talent that can’t win when it matters.

They’re doomed once the playoffs start, right?

Just like the Green Bay Packers were doomed, Matt Scribbins of Hoop Data reminds us.

Do you remember the story of the 2010-2011 Green Bay Packers? They were the trendy pre-season pick to represent the NFC in the Super Bowl. After six weeks, their record stood at 3-3, and no one was predicting they would make the title game. They had to beat the Chicago Bears in Week 17 to even make the playoffs….

Green Bay was 2-6 in games decided by five points or less during the regular season. In the playoffs, they won three straight road games to capture the NFC Title. In the Super Bowl, they beat a team with an affinity for winning close games. Three of their playoff victories were by seven points or less. Mike McCarthy is not complaining right now about his team’s inability to win close games during the regular season. He is sitting at home reliving the moment he hoisted the Lombardi Trophy as the winning coach of Super Bowl XLV.

The tale of the Miami Heat resembles the story about Green Bay. NBA fans can’t stop talking about Miami’s record in close games and declaring them down for the count. Anyone who follows the Association knows they are 5-13 (that’s a better winning percentage than Green Bay’s 2-6 for those who are counting) in games decided by five points or less. But did you know Miami is 3-1 in games decided by six points? 3-0 in games decided by seven points? How about 4-1 in games decided by eight points?

The Heat keep losing close games — but those are close games. We’re talking about a made shot or two, one more stop and the outcome is different. Small fixes, little tweaks in execution.

LeBron James is taking the brunt of this, but as our own John Krolik points out over at ESPN, what LeBron does in the regular season and what happens in the playoffs don’t often correspond. His best playoff performances have come after sub-par regular seasons.

This is still a contending team, a team that is 43-20 despite some injuries to important role players. They are being compared against unrealistic expectations (granted, expectations they helped bring on themselves). This team is not the disaster they seem to be painted as; they are a team that is close.

And like the Packers, those close regular season losses could be meaningless when it really matters.

LeBron understands Clevelanders’ anger, “But you have to get over it.”


LeBron James gets it. He can put himself in their shoes. He understands why the people in his hometown might feel betrayed, why Clevelanders would be angry. Well, a little bit.

But he also says you can’t hold on to the anger forever, as he told Brian Windhorst of ESPN.com.

“If I was a fan and I was on the outside looking in, I could be upset a little bit if one of my favorite players left,” James said. “Or if I felt like he betrayed us or whatever the case may be. But you have to get over it.”

“Sports are very emotional and fans are very emotional,” James said. “At times they really believe you may be related to them you and you sleep in their house. When you do something wrong and you leave their house they can become very emotional. I’ve understood that over the years. But at the same time, you have to understand you have to do what is best yourself.”

It’s a very mature response from James.

Clevelanders may well get over it. Eventually. But certainly not before Dec. 2, when James and the Heat return to Quicken Loans Arena.

Winderman: What 29 other teams? League hops on Heat hype express, too.


So exactly how embarrassed is the NBA about the rest of its product?

How uncomfortable is the league with its other 29 teams that after an offseason of decrying the arrogance of the Miami Heat and the team’s Big Three, the league jumps aboard the hype express?

If you haven’t seen yet, TNT announced it is sending its wonderful pregame crew to the Heat’s season-opener next Tuesday in Boston, as well as to the Heat’s Dec. 2 visit to Cleveland.

Yes, the very Charles Barkley who decried the “punk” behavior by the Heat and LeBron James this summer will be there when James & Co. debut.

On the very same night that the two-time defending NBA champion Lakers will also be featured on TNT, receiving their championship rings, Ernie Johnson, Kenny Smith and Barkley will be on the opposite coast, focusing on a franchise that has not won a single playoff series since taking the 2006 NBA title.

Then, in December, TNT will be erecting its (we assume bulletproof) pregame set at Quicken Loans Arena for a homecoming that certainly will be anything but a celebration of the game.

How much greater of a punk move can there be than chronicling, in person, the suffering of a basketball populace? (Although we do eagerly await the Dan Gilbert pregame interview.)

There is no doubt that “The Decision” remains a television disaster right up there with “Manimal” and that the Heat’s over-the-top July 9 AmericanAirlines Arena celebration was a turnoff in 29 other NBA markets.

But it wasn’t the Heat that summoned ESPN to spend a week in the Florida Panhandle at a remote Air Force installation.

It wasn’t the Heat that requested the presence of ESPN.com’s “Heat Index” for blow-by-blow details of the upcoming 82 games and beyond.

And we can think of a lot of other people Erik Spoelstra would prefer to run into in Boston and Cleveland than Sir Charles.

David Stern was emphatic during his recent round of Europe media sessions about what he envisions as “our most successful season.”

The Bulls and Knicks are on the rise. The Lakers are the twice and still defending champions. The Magic is a preseason colossus. There are compelling stories from coast to coast, in a season when even the Clippers apparently will matter.

Yet the focus remains singular.

That’s a shame.

And on the latest counts, for once this offseason, you can’t blame the Heat if the NBA chooses to be, well, a non-stop Witness.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat.