Tag: Miami Boston

Heat Celtics Basketball

Rondo gets some help, LeBron doesn’t so Celtics win Game 3


Rajon Rondo didn’t put up 44 points in Game 3 because he didn’t have to — he had help this time.

But if the Heat were going to win Friday night LeBron James would have needed to put up huge numbers because his teammates didn’t bother to show up until the fourth quarter.

The result was Boston playing like the Big Three we have come to expect, a vintage virtuoso performance controlling the game most of the way with their defense, leading by 24 at one point and holding off a Miami fourth-quarter run to win its first game of the series 101-91.

Miami still maintains a 2-1 series lead and Sunday’s game in Boston now looms large.

Boston had pretty much everything go its way Friday night, even the calls from the referees (LeBron and Dwyane Wade combined to take just five free throws). The only questions are can the Celtics replicate it and how will they deal with the Heat bringing much more energy and aggressiveness next game?

Miami let Rondo control the tempo from the second quarter on and could not stop Kevin Garnett in the paint, which is what turned the game. Well, really, what turned the game was the 15-0 run that spanned more than six minutes from late in the first quarter through the start of the second. That is when the game and momentum turned.

But during that stretch Rondo made some fantastic post passes to Garnett — some over the top of the defense that allowed Garnett to score at the rim. Boston had 58 points in the paint on the night.

Boston also scored in transition, with Rondo pushing the ball into the paint and kicking out for open 3-pointers.

“The difference was our defensive energy, which allowed us to run,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said. “We ran into space; I thought we had fantastic ball movement for three quarters.”

Boston got balance this time — Rondo had 21 points and 10 assists, Garnett had 24 points and Paul Pierce added 23. The Celtics also finally got some help from the bench, with Marquis Daniels pitching in nine points and Keyon Dooling adding seven.

Miami looked flat offensively and were getting outworked all night long — they didn’t get back in transition and had Rondo running down behind them and nobody trying to find Pierce or Ray Allen spotting up at the arc.

Everyone on Miami looked flat — except for LeBron. Midway through the third quarter he had half the team’s points (28 of 56). LeBron finished with 34 points and had a game that reminded you of his Cleveland days. Wade had 18 but needed 20 shots to get them.

Still, you knew there would be a Heat run and it came in the fourth, with Miami attacking again (although still doing it too much out of isolation). The Heat started closing off the lane to the Celtics again. They made it interesting at the end, and the loud Garden got awfully quiet. Mario Chalmers had a great game with 14 points.

But it was too little, too late.

Miami will be a different team Sunday, more aggressive and looking to attack off the pick-and-roll. They are going to try to set the tone.

If they can’t, we will have an even series. And you know this veteran Celtics team is not going to just roll over; the Heat are going to have to earn it.

Thunder’s Perkins motivated by Kerr’s correct criticism

Manu Ginobili, Kendrick Perkins

Steve Kerr and the TNT broadcast crew called it like it was — Kendrick Perkins struggled on defense the first two games of the Thunder’s series against San Antonio. He was not able to contain Tony Parker when he showed out on pick-and-rolls, he did not recover fast enough to keep up with a rolling Tim Duncan.

If you watched the broadcast of Game 3, you heard Kerr and the broadcast crew refer to Perkins staring them down and calling them out. From the Oklahoman.

After at least two first-half defensive stops aided by his play, Perkins stared down the broadcast crew.

“Talk about that,” he yelled.

Thing is, Perkins played a lot better in Game 3. Like the rest of the Thunder defense. Because the Thunder switched everything Perkins even got isolated on Parker a couple times and shut the speedy French point guard down. Perkins blocked a Manu Ginobili jumper. That’s not his forte — OKC brought him in because they thought they’d be matching up with Andrew Bynum right now — but in Game 3 he was fantastic.

And the TNT crew acknowledged it.

Whatever you’ve got to do to get motivated. But should we really be blaming the TNT crew here? As KD at Ball Don’t Lie noted and NBA.com reported, Perkins himself admitted after Game 2 he struggled.

“In that last game Parker was able to get in there and get off his shots pretty easy,” Perkins said. “So tonight I said, ‘I want to see what you got.’ ” I wanted to challenge him. I wanted to make him really work for it.”

Game 4 in this series is going to be interesting. Very interesting.

PBT Extra: Talking Celtics/Heat with Jessica Camerato

Boston Celtics v Miami Heat - Game Two
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It’s going to be an interesting vibe in Boston Friday night — Celtics fans know that this is likely the last season we will see the “big three” Celtics team together like this. And with the Heat up 2-0 in the series this could be the final home games for these Celtics.

I brought in Jessica Camerato from CSNNE.com — who you should be following on twitter — for this edition of PBT Extra to talk Celtics, Heat, and what Boston has to do to come back in this series. We also talk some Rajon Rondo and what he has to do to lead the team in future years.

By the way, Jessica is convinced Rondo has a jump shot.

Winderman: League’s silence on Rivers, Rondo comments speaks volumes

Celtics Heat Basketball

Something rather curious happened in the two days leading to Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals.


Silence. No NBA announcement of a fine for Doc Rivers. No statement from Stu Jackson, the league’s vice president of discipline.


Not even after the Celtics coach called his Game 1 technical foul from referee Ed Malloy the worst technical he ever had called on him in his career.

So it was curious how Rivers tried to dance around the issue of the inequity of foul calls in Game 2 of the series, basically trying to put words into a reporter’s mouth so he didn’t have to reach into his wallet, something he curiously didn’t have to do in the 48 hours leading to Game 2.

Even after Pacers coach Frank Vogel was fined $15,000 at the start of the previous round for questioning the league’s reluctance to acknowledge flopping by the Heat.

Even after Heat coach Erik Spoelstra was fined $25,000 at the end of that series against Indiana for questioning hard blows from the Pacers against LeBron James and Dwyane Wade that had gone uncalled.

So why the NBA silence with Rivers’ pointed comments about Malloy’s quick whistle?

The only logical answer is the league recognized Rivers was correct, that “Come on,” no matter the punctuation afterward, should not result in a point for the other team, particularly when the only damage created was to a referee’s ears.

Then came Wednesday night and Wade’s rake across the face of Rajon Rondo that went uncalled at the most critical juncture of overtime. This time no whistle. This time Ray Allen speaking up for Rondo when an exhausted, physically and emotionally, Rondo attempted to duck the issue in his postgame presser.

By and large, Wednesday’s crew got it right, be it going to replay to double-check clear-path fouls or correctly reducing a late Rondo 3-pointer to two points with his foot on the line.

They got all the correctable calls correct.

But that doesn’t make Rondo’s face feel any better.

Or get the Celtics level in this series, with the Heat now up 2-0 heading into Friday’s Game 3.

So expect for silence this time, as well, regarding Rivers’ non-comment comments on the inequity of  Wednesday’s whistle and regarding Allen’s podium defense of the call that Rondo rightly deserved when Wade’s fingers met Rondo’s face.

For all the statements issued by the NBA and Jackson, sometimes silence makes the greatest statement.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter @IraHeatBeat.

Celtics find their offense in Rondo, Heat still pull out OT win

Boston Celtics v Miami Heat - Game Two

There are occasional games where the Celtics offense looks good. Games where Rajon Rondo looks like the best point guard in the land, driving the lane and knocking down threes. Games where the Celtics and passing and cutting and scoring with the shots they want.

Boston had one of those nights Wednesday. In a series where they were expected to struggle to score Rajon Rondo dropped 44 points, 10 assists and 8 rebounds. He scored all 12 Celtics points in overtime. Ray Allen was knocking down threes. Paul Pierce had 21. Boston put up 111 points. Their offense showed up.

And the Heat still won in overtime 115-111 to take a 2-0 series lead heading back to Boston.

“It’s tough to have (Rondo) play that way and not win the game,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said afterward. “He basically did everything right. We had a lot of opportunities to win the game.”

This one is a punch to the gut for Boston. This was the game they needed to win. They played with the energy and resolve of a younger team, they were physical and just took the game to the Heat. Boston pushed Miami off the spots on the floor they wanted to be, Boston cut off the penetration. It worked.

They led by 15 in the first half, and while you knew a Heat run was coming the Celtics fought those runs off and had chances to win it. They will regret not doing so.

In the end, the Heat made plays. Miami showed the kind of resiliency we usually just credit to veteran teams like the Celtics. LeBron James got the offensive rebound on his own miss at the end of regulation robbing the Celtics of a last shot. (LeBron would miss a second attempt to win in regulation, a 20-foot jumper over Rondo when he should have attacked more. Then late the Celtics struggled to stop the LeBron/Dwyane Wade pick and roll. Wade attacked and got a key and-1 over Kevin Garnett. On the whole Boston did a good job on Wade, trapping on the pick-and-roll with bigs and trying to take the ball out of his hands. It’s why the picks set by LeBron worked so well — you can’t trap off him. Wade finished with 23 (LeBron had 34).

The Heat kept attacking — they took 47 free throws as a team. It’s a sign they were trying to get to the rim. LeBron took 24 free throws alone and helped Paul Pierce to foul out.  The Celtics as a team only took 29 free throws. They think they got robbed (and they did at a key point in OT when Wade fouled Rondo on the head and it was not called).

Udonis Haslem stepped up with some timely key shots, finishing with 13 points and 11 rebounds. Boston just does not have people they can turn to for that kind of bench scoring — the Celtics had 7 bench points. It’s not enough. That kind of effort from the starters and to not get a win hurts.

Boston heads home and needs to replicate that offensive performance — their offense has been a roller coaster all season but this time the Celtics have to find a way to do it again. And a little better. Get a few more calls at home and make it stick.

Because now they have to win 4 of 5 from the Heat. And with their athletes, you know the Heat will keep making plays.