Tag: Miami Big Three

T-Mobile Magenta Carpet At The NBA All-Star Game - Arrivals

Thanks to lockout, Heat owner has a lot of LeBron’s money


Sometimes, you really wonder about the people who advise LeBron James. And Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, in this case.

Let’s take a step back. Remember how earlier today we passed along information about the Heat’s Mike Miller selling his Miami area home, and how that is a sign he (and everyone else) thinks the amnesty clause will be used on him once the lockout ends? Well, Brian Windhorst tells the same story over at ESPN.

But he adds this fascinating detail.

Heat owner Micky Arison is worth more than $4 billion and his sitting on a massive lump of money from thousands of season ticket holders who’ve paid in full. Not to mention he didn’t have to pay LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh their July balloon payments. James, sources said, was owed a $12 million check in July as part of his contract that allowed him to get 80 percent of his annual salary up front. That cash is still sitting in the Heat’s coffers. Yet the Heat’s employees are all swallowing 25 percent paycuts right now because of the lockout. We infer from this exactly what Arison has proven for years: he’s a businessman not just a billionaire.

Everyone — even the most optimistic people in the league — knew there was going to be a lockout and it was going to last through the summer. (The optimists thought no games would be lost.)

So how did anyone approve a July 1 balloon payment that wouldn’t be made for months, at best? The league had been telling players to space out their payments from last season (if your contract had the team paying you for last season into the summer, that was fine, it is payment for services delivered). But the big three went with the big balloon payments.

How u, Miami?

Winderman: Wade says he, LeBron are similar, can play together

Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade (L) and teammate LeBron James wait to leave the stadium after losing the NBA Championship to the Dallas Mavericks in Miami

MIAMI — Yes, Dwyane Wade said Tuesday as the Heat emptied out their lockers at AmericanAirlines arena, he and LeBron James play similar styles.

And no, Wade said, they’re not changing.

Amid post-Finals debate about whether the duo possess complementary or redundant styles, an examination exacerbated by Jeff Van Gundy’s on-camera musing during the NBA Finals about a possible trade of one of the Heat’s perimeter stars, Wade said the dual dilemma for opposing defenses was the goal from the start.

“I’m 29 years of what I’ve been doing,” Wade said, somewhat incredulous that after winning an Eastern Conference championship and coming within two wins of an NBA title this suddenly has surfaced as an issue. “I mean, obviously you try to get better in areas, but you can’t just say, ‘OK, since you’re a driver, I’m just going to become a shooter.’ That’s not what the organization wants me to be, that’s not we want him to be and it’s not what our fans want.

“Being similar players, that makes us dynamic, that makes us a special team, because we have similar capabilities and put pressure on defenses certain ways. So we wouldn’t change that at all.”

What will change, Wade said, is learning how to best utilize the similar skills sets, avoiding situations such as when James often was reduced to spectator during the Finals against the Mavericks.

“I thought we did a good job of getting better as the season went on, obviously from the first game to the end, coming from being individually good players to being good teammates, and being able to play off each other,” he said. “And that’s only going to get better as we get more comfortable with each other, as our game continues to grow, and obviously for LeBron he’ll be more comfortable in his surroundings.”

To Wade, the Finals were a hiccup, with the Eastern Conference semifinals more of the goal, when he averaged 30.2 points over those five games against Boston, and James 28.

“I’m sure it wasn’t easy for him to just make that adjustment, getting in this new situation,” he said of James. “So he’ll be even more comfortable next year. Just with time, you get better with age, you get better with time. And I’m sure we will all just get more comfortable playing with each other, have a little bit more confidence coming into the season knowing we know each other and not trying to figure each other out.”

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat.

Chris Bosh admits it’s The Big Two and Bosh in Miami

Philadelphia 76ers v Miami Heat - Game Five

When the Miami Heat do post-game player interviews, first Chris Bosh comes in and talks from the table. Then later (often quite a bit later) LeBron James and Dwyane Wade come in and speak together.

It’s felt like that on the court too this season — that the Big Three is really a Big Two +One.

Bosh told the Sun Sentinel that’s pretty much the case.

From post-game behavior to pre-game reading material, Bosh always has been different from the Heat’s other superstars. Being the third wheel? No problem. Less media attention? More time to read. Sometimes referred to as the weak link? It makes him stronger.

James and Wade are the mainland. Bosh is perfectly fine being Hawaii or Alaska, off to the side.

“For me, I’m not afraid to dance to the beat of my own drum,” Bosh said. “There are things I like to do on my own. When it’s time to come together as a unit, we come together as a unit….

“With me, I’ve always just been different,” Bosh said. “I’ve never tried to fit in. I’m one of the fellas, great. I get along with everybody, great. But if I’m going to read my book, I’m going to read my book and this is what I’m doing.”

This is not a big deal, they do not need to be “the super friends” so long as it doesn’t bleed onto the court. And it hasn’t. Great teammates do not need to get along (do I really need to point out Kobe and Shaq?).

And up 2-0 on Boston, right now it’s all good. So you can call Bosh whatever you like. He’s focused on his book.