Tag: Melo trade

Oklahoma City Thunder v Denver Nuggets

Nene says he wants to stay a Nugget forever. If they pay up.


After playing most of the season under the cloud of the Carmelo Anthony trade situation, the sun has broken through in Denver. And like flowers everywhere, the Nuggets are blooming in the spring.

Their defense is better. Their offense is better. Their energy is better. They are winning. It’s a fun place to play.

Nene could leave if he wanted. He can opt out of the $11.6 million he is due next season — and may to secure a longer-term deal — but told Hoopsworld he’d prefer to stick around Denver.

“I want to be a Nugget for now and forever,” Nene told HOOPSWORLD.” But I know there is a lot of business [to handle], so I can say that today. “

Translation: “step up and pay me.”

A lot of teams would be willing to pay the Brazilian center. He averages 15.1 points a game and is shooting a league best 63 percent. He does most of his damage near the rim but he has enough of a midrange game you have to respect it. He’s strong and draws the and-one on 10.5 percent of his shots. He’s good on the boards. He can defend the post.

Teams are going to make a run at him, but Nene made it clear to Hoopsworld the Nuggets get the first crack at keeping him.

“Oh yeah for sure,” said Nene reiterating his desire to remain in Denver. “It’s totally different right now. Everybody is excited, everybody is happy and everybody is enjoying playing [together]. And after games [now] you feel good. You feel like your mission is done…

“It is no surprise in basketball when you’re playing the right way,” said Nene. “When you ball and play together, when you help each other there’s no secret [to success]. That’s what we’re doing right now.”

Denver front office, the ball is your court.

Carmelo Anthony’s Dear John letter to Denver fans

Carmelo Anthony

Carmelo Anthony has gone from Denver. Because he forced his way out.

But, you know, he still loves you Denver fans. He really appreciates you.

Sure, he has moved on the next phase of his career. Bright lights and the big city. But he’ll always care about you.

That’s why he left you this goodbye letter on his Web site Thursday (via the Denver Post).

A Note to My Denver fans

I had to let you know how I felt about you, the city, my fans, my friends. You’ve been supportive of me and my NBA career for the past 8 years and that doesn’t go unnoticed.

Drafted when I was 19 I called Denver and the Nuggets my home. The city and the fans embraced me and watched me grow as a man and a player.

There are no words to express the gratitude and appreciation I have for Denver, the Nuggets and all the fans.

You will always be a part of my heart.

One Love,

I am certain Denver fans will let Anthony know of their feelings toward him next time he is in town. Then again, since they are 4-1 and playing good defense since he left, maybe they will get over him sooner than you think.

Carmelo’s move may make CBA negotiations nastier

Carmelo Anthony James Dolan

Utah Jazz owner Greg Miller talked about it when he tried to explain to a shaken fan base why he felt he had to trade Deron Williams away.

His argument: it’s a new era of stars congregating in big markets. The players have taken control of the process in a way they have not before. We could not risk Williams leaving as a free agent and getting nothing for him, so we had to make this move.

But then Miller said something else that hints at just how difficult the collective bargaining agreement negotiations are going to be:

“I’m not interested in seeing a congregation of star players on a handful of teams throughout the league…” Miller said. “I would like to see as much parity as there can be in the league.”

What has happened in the last couple years is a monumental shift in how and where free agents will go, and how players are using the leverage of free agency to move around. Carmelo Anthony’s move to the Knicks was the latest, most publicized proof of that. But it is a trend, no doubt.

And some owners want to shut that down.

In the current CBA, players were given the freedom of movement, but the “home team” (the team the player was with) was given a huge advantage — they could offer more money and more years. Nobody was going to walk away from tens of millions on a max deal, right? For a long time that was enough of an advantage, players usually took the money.

But LeBron James and Chris Bosh took less money and planned a superteam. Carmelo Anthony used the leverage of taking less money to get to New York (with his money). Now smaller market owners like Miller are trading D-Will now rather than risk losing out.

The players have the power. Maybe they have always had the power, but they are flexing that muscle more now. And the owners want to shift that power balance — and the players are going to fight to keep it.

Maybe it’s through a franchise tag. Maybe it’s through changes in max contracts and a hard cap (or the severity of penalties for exceeding a soft cap). There are a lot of ways to do it. But you can bet the owners are pushing hard for a fundamental shift in the financial and player movement structures that exist now. There are a handful of big-market owners who are doves on this issue, but there are more and more smaller-market owners who are hawks.

Those hawks watched the Carmelo Anthony scenario play out, they watched LeBron and Bosh last summer and they said, “there but for the grace of God go I.” They know if they luck into drafting a true star, they could lose him. They could lose the meal ticket. It will be couched in terms of franchise viability, but what it really means is making sure they have ways to hold on to their elite players.

The National Basketball Players Association, the union, is going to fight to keep player movement. They will argue it is good for the league (television ratings are way up and league wide game attendance is up slightly). They will argue that it is only fair that a person who fulfills his contract can choose his place of employment.

This was going to be a nasty fight as it was. What happened with Carmelo will make it nastier. And longer. And that is worse for all of us.