Tag: Melo to Knicks

New York Knicks v Dallas Mavericks

Other key Knicks shooting worse since ‘Melo’s arrival


Since Carmelo Anthony arrived with the Knicks, their offense overall has gotten nominally better. They had averaged 109.8 points per 100 possessions, now that is up to 110.4.

But they haven’t looked good doing it. (And the slightly better offense doesn’t make up for the much worse defense, especially in the fourth quarter. Which is why the Knicks are losing. A lot.)

Other key Knicks have seen their shooting percentages drop since Anthony’s arrival, points out OG Knicks blogger Mike Kurylo at Knickerblogger.

Amar’e Stoudemire has seen a decrease — his true shooting percentage (think points per shot taken, counting free throws and threes) is down 0.5 percent (57 to 56.5 percent) and his points produced per minute is off slightly, also. Landry Fields also has seen a 0.6 decrease in his true shooting percentage, but his points per minute are up slightly as he is getting more shots.

After that Shawne Williams, Ronny Turiaf and Bill Walker all have seen more dramatic drop offs in their shooting percentage and points per minute since Carmelo Anthony’s arrival.

The two players who have seen their numbers go up — Toney Douglas and Roger Mason Junior — both are coming off injuries so their improvement probably have more to do with getting healthy than improved offense.

Part of the problem in New York is that outside of Fields a lot of the guys being asked to do more are guys who played smaller roles before the Knicks traded away all their depth to get Anthony. But added to that is right now there is no flow to the Knicks offense — they play much slower and the ball sticks in the half court, not moving around. Come the playoffs — if they make it — the Knicks will be much easier to defend.

The reasons behind all this are not simple fixes. It doesn’t matter much this season, expectations were overblown for this year anyway, but next season the Knicks need to figure some things out. Because this is New York where expectations are always overblown.

Jerry West says it’s too early to judge ‘Melo trade

Image (1) jWest-thumb-250x166-18358.jpg for post 3706

Jerry West is trying to talk some sense into New Yorkers. Good luck with that.

The Logo spoke with the Associated Press and said what Knicks management and everyone on that end of the Carmelo Anthony trade has said — this is going to take time. To expect immediate results was a mistake, the trade was about getting a second superstar. Don’t worry about the 7-10 record since the trade (or the fact Denver is 11-4 and playing with newfound energy).

“You can’t judge a trade by that, and it also gives them building blocks,” West said before the game. “They got not only Carmelo, they got a tremendous player in Chauncey Billups. He’s really good and so they got two really good players out of it, but they haven’t played together that long so I don’t say it’s patience, I think to me it’s understandable that they wouldn’t come in and burn the house down as far as winning games…

“Regardless of how people try to read trades – Denver is playing well, they certainly have more depth now than they had before – but the reality of a trade like this, you’re not going to be able to judge this until next year or two years from now,” he said. “Which team is going to prosper the most, which team is going to make progress to the ultimate goal of any franchise, and that’s to win championships.”

New York is going to make the playoffs this season for the first time in years. That is a step forward, one New Yorkers need to try and savor even as the Bulls or Celtics give them a good thrashing in the first round. Then let Donnie Walsh — you’d better hope it’s Walsh — work some more magic in the offseason to start putting role players that fit around Anthony and Amar’e Stoudemire. Let Billups and D’Antoni really get on the same page. Let it all come together.

Then next year at this time you can say it was a mistake and call for D’Antoni’s head.

New York’s pick-up game defense neutralizes improved offense

New York Knicks v Miami Heat

Win three in a row, lose three in a row. Beat the Heat, get swept on a home-and-home by the Pacers.

Getting a read on the New York Knicks with Carmelo Anthony is hard because they are so erratic. They are 6-6 since the trade drama ended and have looked both like the team nobody wants to face in the first round and have looked like a team that will be swept right out of the playoffs.

Why? Their defense.

John Schuhmann over at NBA.com broke down the numbers and found that since the trade the Knicks offense has improved from 107.6 points per 100 possessions to 109.6. The problem is the defense went from giving up 106.1 points per 100 possessions to 109.2.

Since the break, the Knicks have the fourth-best offense in the league, but the 24th-best defense. And it’s not like they’ve been playing some offensive juggernauts in that stretch. In fact, eight of their last 12 opponents are in the bottom half of the league offensively. They allowed the Pacers to shoot 54 percent over two games in the last few days, after Indiana shot just 41 percent over their previous six games.

He went a step farther and noticed when Amar’e Stoudemire and Anthony are on the court together, they allow 110.9 points per 100 possessions. The offense is at 110.5. So, essentially it’s a wash. We’ll add that the Knicks still have done the best when just Stoudemire is on the floor.

I hear the Knicks fans argument now — we traded away our depth to get two stars together. The defensive players can be put in place around them, but getting two stars had to be the priority. That is how you win a title. Plus, Chauncey Billups has been out for a number of those games.

Valid points. But the numbers are showing what our eyes have already seen — the Knicks have their stars but still have a long way to go to be contenders for anything. And that fixing the defense has got to be the off-season priority.

Denver’s defense is much better, but that’s not all about ‘Melo

Detroit Pistons v Denver Nuggets

The numbers do not lie.

It’s a small sample size, but the trend is unmistakable — Denver is a much better defensive team without Carmelo Anthony. They have given up 99.3 points per 100 possessions in the 10 games he has been gone, a number that would be the best in the league if spread out over a season. Again, small sample size theater at play here, but the trend explains why the Nuggets are 8-2 in their last 10.

Over at SB Nation, Rohan Cruyff dove into what the Nuggets are doing better and how much of it is the Carmelo factor.

What exactly are the Nuggets doing on the floor that has fueled this defensive turnaround? In a word: everything. Opponents are shooting nearly 3 percent worse from the floor (a seemingly small figure, but keep in mind the spread from first to 30th in the NBA is less than 7 percent), turning the ball over 14 percent more frequently, visiting the foul line 23 percent less frequently, and Denver has upped its defensive rebounding rate to almost 80 percent during the stretch (Orlando leads the league at 77 percent). This is a completely different team on the defensive end.

At the same time, it’s very important to note that none of these things are blanket indictments of Anthony’s defense. ‘Melo’s departure has likely allowed George Karl to place a renewed focus on the defensive side of the ball; at the same time, two of Denver’s primary defensive improvements — defensive rebounding and foul rate — have been in areas Anthony historically excels in.

The removal of one player — especially not a player who is a defensive anchor in the paint — is not going to make this kind of change. For whatever reason Denver has changed its focus on to the defensive end and is playing with much more energy.

Denver is a team playing with a chip on its shoulder, and at the NBA level defense is as much or more about effort than just scheme. They are trying, they are committed on that end of the floor in a new way.

And that is taking them into the playoffs, where defensive teams are hard to knock out.

‘Melo wants you to know he is too a team player

New York Knicks v Dallas Mavericks

It’s been pretty hard to miss the glee coming out of the Rocky Mountains — Denver is 8-2 since the Carmelo Anthony trade and they are all too happy to tell you about how they are more of a team, how they are playing defense, how the sun shine feels warmer and how the bluebird of happiness now mops up the sweat at their practices.

George Karl can’t seem to help but take some backhanded digs at Anthony when he talks about the teamwork and ball movement in Denver.

The Knicks are 6-5 since the trade and have alternated between looking brilliant and looking like something you might step in when visiting one of those areas near the great lawn in Central Park where dogs get some run.

For the record, Anthony is pretty sick of the sniping from out West, as he told the New York Post.

“I really think they kind of don’t want me to have success in New York, the way I look at it,” Anthony said at this morning’s shootaround at Conseco Field House before the Knicks get their rematch vs. the Pacers. “I try not to think about that. I’ve been in Denver 7 ½ years. For me to move on was a hard thing to do. This is a business and I’ve cut my ties there. ”

“For me personally, it’s a matter of trying to make other guys better,” Anthony said. “I think it’s a challenge I take upon myself to get guys like Shawne Williams going, Landry (Fields) going, keep Toney (Douglas’) confidence up since he’s coming off the bench now with Chauncey (Billups) back.

Since coming to New York Anthony is assisting on about 17 percent of other teammates field goals when he is on the floor in New York, up from about 14.4 percent in Denver earlier this season. Anthony is also shooting a little more often as well (about a shot a game, or half a shot per 36 minute average).

Anthony is not completely selfish, but he’s also out there to score points. That’s what he does. He may be conscious about trying to set other guys up, but at the end of the day he was brought in to shoot the rock.

What will change the perception? Winning. That’s it. That changes everything in American sports. Right now Denver is winning more and they get to set the tone of debate because people are checking them out and listening to them. When the Knicks start winning more, people will praise how Anthony makes teammates better.

Even though he’s pretty much the exact same player, NYC or Denver.