Tag: Mavericks beat Heat

Dallas Mavericks head coach Rick Carlisl

Mavericks become first team to ride cold streak to title

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Among the many things that needed to right for the Dallas Mavericks to win their first ever NBA title, they needed to stay healthy. And while that is true of every team, with an older team the odds of problems go up.

So, the Mavericks players got cold.

During their playoff run, a number of the Mavericks veterans took part in cryogenic therapy. We’ll let Ric Bucher from ESPN explain the medieval torture healing therapy (via KD at Ball Don’t Lie).

From late April right through to their final championship-clinching victory over the Heat, a sextet of Mavs — Jason Kidd, Dirk Nowitzki, Jason Terry, Shawn Marion, Tyson Chandler and Brian Cardinal — made the 20-minute trek from American Airlines Center to a wellness facility in Plano, Texas, two times a week. The grizzled NBA vets, all of whom are 33 or older except for the 28-year-old Chandler, would head to an upstairs room that had all the warmth of a no-frills clinic. They would strip to their underwear and socks, don fleece gloves and, one at a time, step inside a six-foot-tall, padded blue-green silo that encased them up to their necks (or, in the case of the seven-footers, Nowitzki and Chandler, up to their chests). A large metal bin next to the silo would begin to whir, and smoky vapor would swirl out of the chamber, as if the players were being cooked in a cauldron.

Actually, they were being frozen. For two and a half minutes — at a cost of $75 per person, billed to Mavs owner Mark Cuban — blasts of nitrogen-chilled air emanated from the walls, quickly dropping the air temperature to as low as -320 degrees Fahrenheit. By the last 30 to 45 seconds, their bodies would be shaking uncontrollably.

As a guy who has spent his entire life living in warm climates for a reason, that sounds like torture. Or a weekend in Fargo.

It makes some medical sense (at least to those of us non-doctor types) — athletes have been taking ice baths for years. This is in theory just a more intense version of that and I knew some European teams (soccer especially) used this. Read Bucher’s article to find out more about how it is supposed to work.

I have no idea if it works, what matters is the players at least thought it did. Terry raved about it in the article, and one would not keep subjecting themselves to this if they didn’t think there was a benefit. Whether the effect was placebo or real, the Mavericks became the first team in NBA history to ride a cold streak to a title.

It’s summer, but Jason Terry still tweaking LeBron

Miami Heat v Dallas Mavericks - Game Five

Jason Terry just can’t help himself.

All through the finals he didn’t back down and trash talked LeBron. The Mavs won, but Terry isn’t done.

Remember how after the finals ended LeBron said that all those Heat haters, “at the end of the day they have to wake up tomorrow and have the same life that they had before they woke up today.”

Terry told New York-based Zags blog that he is happy to go back to his life.

“Well, my normal little life just got a little bigger, so I thank him for that,” the Dallas Mavericks guard said Wednesday at the Reebok Breakout Challenge at Philadelphia University.

Terry also gave his theory on why he and the Mavericks are NBA champions.

“Basketball’s a team sport,” said Terry, who averaged 17.5 points per game in the playoffs and shot over 44 percent from three-point range. “When you out in competition, it takes five guys on the court at a time. They had three great players. They just needed a little more help. We had about nine or 10 exceptional players that played well. We maximized our individual talent within a team concept and that’s why we’re the NBA champions.”