Tag: Mark Jackson


No playoff promises from Warriors’ Jackson this year


Last year Mark Jackson was coming to the head coach’s chair straight out of a broadcast booth where he was supposed to be opinionated and brash. He was in front of a new team ownership group that was brimming with confidence. Jackson played right into all of it and was talking playoffs for the Warriors.

Fast forward a year, where Jackson is coaching what should be a better Warriors team. But you are not hearing any bold predictions from Jackson this time around.

No, he has learned the art of the cliché and sounded like a lot of other coaches during his media availability before training camp Wednesday. Here are some highlight quotes, via Matt Steinmetz of CSNBayArea.com.

Pressure is my mindset. I don’t care who I’m coaching, the pressure is always going to be to win. Certainly we have a better basketball team. I don’t run from it; I embrace it.”

Are they going to be a half-court team as they are supposed to start David Lee and Andrew Bogut?

“I would argue that David Lee is a great runner. I would say we have a great rebounder in (Andrew) Bogut and four guys who can run above average for their position. I would say we’re better to run because we’re a better rebounding team. Each guy rebounds their position well.

“I would say running more and when you have the weapons that we have offensively, the best way to attack a defense is when they’re not set. We’re not going to be a slow-down offensive team.”

Jackson has learned some lessons about the fan base and dealing with expectations off the court. As we move into the season we’ll see what he has learned on the court and if he can take a team with good talent the next step up into the playoffs. It will not be easy in a deep Western conference (they would have to beat out the likes of Minnesota and Dallas to make it) but it’s not out of the question.

Mark Jackson has good players in Golden State now, can he lead them to wins?

Mark Jackson Warriors

Last season, it wouldn’t have mattered if Golden State brought in John Wooden circa 1968 to coach the team — they didn’t have enough talent on the roster to win a lot of games. And what talent they did have kept getting injured. Mark Jackson kind of had a free pass to learn how to be a head coach on the fly.

This season is going to be different.

After some deadline trades and offseason moves, the Warriors should have a starting lineup of Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, Richard Jefferson (subject to change), David Lee and Andrew Bogut. Off the bench they bring Jarrett Jack, Harrison Barnes, Brandon Rush (he could start over Jefferson) and Carl Landry.

That’s not a contender, but it’s not bad. So now it is on Jackson to prove he can be an NBA coach and coax some wins out of the roster. Warriors GM Bob Meyers said as much to Matt Steinmentz at CSNBayArea.com.

“Basketball operations, from the ownership group, myself, everybody, worked very hard to give them (the coaching staff) something to work with. I’m not sure we did last year, to be frank. I’m not sure we could expect much from the talent we supplied the coaching staff.

“But I told Mark. I called him after the Landry signing, I said, ‘You’ve got something to work with.’ Which I truly believe. And I don’t think he’s running from that challenge. I think he’s embracing it. I think he’s saying: ‘Yeah, I do.’ It’s up to them now to go forward with this group. I don’t know what your guys’ opinions are but I don’t think it’s unfair to ask to go forward and do well with this group of players.”

Allow me to translate that for you:

“You better win now or you’ll be broadcasting again next season.”

A lot of people questioned the hiring of Jackson, the ABC analyst who had no coaching experience (but did have a long NBA career). Last season wasn’t a fair test of if he could do the job. But this season will be. It’s on him now.

Jackson, Warriors issue statements on affair, extortion case

Mark Jackson Warriors

We told you earlier today about the FBI breaking up an extortion plot that targeted Warriors coach Mark Jackson. A former stripper with a criminal record teamed with another man to use nude photos, text messages and more that Jackson sent in an affair six years ago to extort money from him. The man and woman have been arrested.

Jackson still had a public relations situation to deal with. Jackson has been married 22 years to the same woman and is a minister of his own church in the Los Angeles area.

Thursday he released this statement:

My family and I were the victims of an extortion scheme.

The scheme began on April 3, 2012, when the Warriors were in Memphis to play the Grizzlies. A man approached me at the team hotel with personal information which he threatened to sell to a tabloid. At the time, he demanded a substantial sum of money. Regrettably, I paid him. In retrospect, I understand that this was a terrible lapse in judgment and a course of action I would not recommend to anyone.

Following the encounter in Memphis – a little over two weeks later – the extortionist sent an e-mail and phoned my wife, Desiree, making threats and demanding additional money. At that point, I informed the Warriors about the situation and asked for their guidance. We immediately notified the FBI, which promptly began an investigation.

The personal information in the extortion scheme related to a woman that I, mistakenly, had an extra-marital relationship with six years ago – prior to joining the Warriors – when I was a TV sports analyst. I made my wife aware of the relationship at that time, apologized to her and we reconciled. Obviously, my self-centered transgression at that time is not something I’m proud of, but I’m blessed to have an incredible wife, mother and partner and I thank the Lord for her each day.

I recognize the extremely poor judgment that I used both in having an affair six years ago – including the embarrassing communication I exhibited during that time – and in attempting to deal with the extortion scheme at first by myself. I made some egregious errors. I apologize for any embarrassment I may have caused my family, friends and, of course, the Warriors.

At that time in my life, I was not pastoring. Three years ago, my wife and I established a ministry. With deepest regret, I want to apologize to my Church Family.

I was wrong. We must live Holy.

To me, this is water under the bridge. How Jackson and his wife choose to deal their personal situation — even that the affair happened in the first place — is a personal matter.

The Golden State Warriors released this statement.

In response to media inquiries, Golden State Warriors Head Coach Mark Jackson today confirmed that he and his family were the victims of an extortion scheme attempting to blackmail them in exchange for money. The suspects were arrested on June 25 by the FBI.

Jackson informed the Warriors of the extortion scheme in late April – three weeks after his first encounter with the extortionist – and solicited help from the organization. At that point, Jackson and the Warriors immediately contacted the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Although not condoning his previous actions that led to the extortion attempt, the Warriors fully support Coach Jackson during this time and thank law enforcement authorities and the FBI for their prompt assistance in helping Coach Jackson and his family.

Report: Mark Jackson’s job as Warriors coach is safe


Mark Jackson is finishing his first season as head coach of the Warriors, an inauspicious debut due largely to circumstances beyond his control.

The Warriors decided to go into full tank rebuilding mode at the trade deadline by dealing Monta Ellis for an injured Andrew Bogut, and are playing it safe by shutting down Stephen Curry and his recurring ankle problems for the rest of the season.

The lack of available talent on the roster should give Jackson a pass in his first season, and it will in all likelihood, reports Marcus Thompson of the Contra Costa Times (via HoopsHype):

Admittedly, it sounds a little ridiculous. Who would fire a coach one year into a three-year contract – after they doomed his chances in his first year by trading away his best player.

But, for a team struggling to get 25 wins, nobody is 100 percent secure. Not to mention a couple headliner head coaches may become available, which might make the Warriors want to nab one while they can.

Nonetheless, I’ve assured by a couple team sources that Mark Jackson is safe – as safe as could be expected anyway. They won’t say that publicly – Joe Lacob, who would play the role of Donald Trump should Jackson be fired, offered only a no comment. Still, it’s understood among management that Jackson will be back and Golden State executives like the job he is doing. Someone high up will say as much at season’s end.

Common sense says Jackson will be back next season, even without this sourced report. Ownership isn’t going to want to pay him for two years to go away, even if a big name like Mike D’Antoni or Nate McMillan were to express interest. Or, if an even bigger name became available in the offseason — like Stan Van Gundy, perhaps — the team still would be hard-pressed to bite.

Watching from afar, it seems like Jackson has been just fine in his first season as an NBA head coach — not definitively good or bad in any situation specific enough to warrant effusive praise or criticism.

Average doesn’t often get it done, and it can sometimes get you fired, depending on expectations. Those, however, are as low as they’ve ever been in the Bay Area to end this lockout-shortened season, which is why we’ll likely see Jackson back for a second chance next year.

Warriors coach Jackson says “no excuses,” then blames refs

Mark Jackson Warriors

We want to congratulate Mark Jackson on what soon will be his first fine as an NBA head coach. It’s coming.

Jackson was frustrated after the Thunder executed better down the stretch and in a contradictory statement laid part of the problem at the feet of the referees, as reported by the San Francisco Chronicle (via Ball Don’t Lie).

“We’re a no-excuse basketball team,” Jackson said. “Like we say, ‘One play doesn’t lose it.’ But on that play at the end, David Lee gets hammered by James Harden, clearly. We don’t get that call. David Lee picks up his fifth foul when he doesn’t even put contact on Russell Westbrook, who blatantly fouls Monta Ellis.

“These are calls that you cannot get back, but they hurt us. I don’t accept ‘My bad’ from my players all night long, and it’s getting old accepting ‘My bad’ (from the officials) on missed calls.”

For the record coach, you lost this game because you didn’t play good defense all night then got out-executed down the stretch — the six turnovers and the under 40 percent shooting in the fourth were bigger issues than the refs.