Tag: Mark Jackson

George Karl

Sources: Kings prefer George Karl, not serious about hiring Mark Jackson


The Sacramento Kings shocked many in the NBA world when they abruptly fired head coach Mike Malone last week. Malone is respected in league circles and most rival scouts, coaches and executives believe he had been doing a good job coaching the team. He was also popular in the Kings’ locker room, particularly with star DeMarcus Cousins.

Almost instantly after the move landscape-changing rumors of the long-term replacement hit the wire seemingly every other day — George Karl, Mark Jackson, even Vinny Del Negro — leaving Tyrone Corbin in a lame duck situation. We reported last week Karl was considered the early front-runner.

Now sources tell PBT that though the team is still very interested in hiring Karl, they are hesitant to pay an expected asking price in the range of $5 million per year or more.

In the meantime they have allowed themselves to be connected to former Warriors coach Mark Jackson, staging a not-so-secret meeting at Sleep Train Arena following Thursday’s nationally televised game that Jackson called for ESPN.

Sources tell PBT that Jackson has “no chance” of being the Kings’ next coach, adding that the meeting was both personal in nature and mutually beneficial for all parties – sending Karl a message at the negotiating table and for Jackson, keeping his name in the news as a future head coaching candidate.

Karl has made it no secret that he would like to coach the Kings, and the team would appear to have a way out of their coaching mess if they can strike a deal.

Hiring Karl can be sold to a frustrated locker room and fan base as an upgrade, albeit a very messy one that’s going to leave a mark if not dealt with soon. It should be no surprise that the Kings’ locker room has grown tired of the ongoing circus surrounding this front office decision, made by Pete D’Allesandro and signed off on by owner Vivek Ranadive and advisor Chris Mullin.

Had Malone been doing a bad job – on or off the court – there wouldn’t be quite the urgency to find a replacement. But with the collective head-scratching going on in the locker room and on both sides of the wall surrounding the royal kingdom, the lack of action on Plan B is going to continue being a distraction. While reports have said Corbin will get to finish out the season, a hiring sooner than that would help stabilize the situation.

Mark Jackson tells Dan Patrick if not fired he might have resigned (VIDEO)

Boston Celtics v Golden State Warriors

We’ve mentioned this about Mark Jackson getting fired as coach of the Golden State Warriors a few times, but it bears repeating — this was more of a mutual decision than many realize.

To the point that Jackson considered resigning if he had not been fired, he told Dan Patrick.

I’m not sure I buy that — I don’t think Jackson was going to walk away from $2.75 million. But that he was frustrated and okay with being let go is a better way to phrase it.

Jackson had created a “our locker room against the world” mentality that the players ate up. However that outside world included the front office and ownership, and that created a divisive situation, one that was abrasive to both sides. There was simply a huge cultural divide, very different perspectives and personalities between the coach and the owner, and that just could not be sustained.

Tim Kawakami from the San Jose Mercury News also joined Dan Patrick to talk about the situation.

Warriors owner explains rationale for dismissing Jackson

Joe Lacob, Peter Guber

OAKLAND – Hours after meeting with Mark Jackson and dismissing the coach he hired 35 months ago, Warriors CEO Joe Lacob sat in his corner office explaining why the franchise would fire its most successful coach over the past two decades.

Proficiency, Lacob conceded, was not the primary factor behind his decision.

“The decision to not bring Mark back is not willy-nilly; there are reasons,” Lacob said Tuesday. “It’s less based on performance, that is win-loss record, and perhaps slightly more based on overall philosophy.”

The Warriors finished the regular season 51-31, their best record since 1991-92. They were coming off consecutive postseason appearances for the first time ’92. Their season ended with a Game 7 playoff to the Clippers on Saturday in Los Angeles.

When I asked Lacob if the team’s record was unsatisfactory, he said that was not the case.

“I would not say it’s unsatisfactory,” Lacob said. “I would say that it did not meet our goals.”

Lacob described the team’s primary goals as being among the top four teams in the Western Conference. The Warriors, for the second year in a row, finished sixth.

RELATED: Seven names to watch in Golden State coaching search

“We did improve the team, on paper, and we thought that was a reasonable expectation,” he said, referring mostly to the addition of forward Andre Iguodala. “We did not achieve that. We had a good year, but just didn’t excel at the level we had hoped to.”

There were contributing factors, including injuries, which Lacob acknowledged. Starting center Andrew Bogut lost 15 games due to injuries and a suspension and was not available in the postseason. Backup center Jermaine O’Neal missed 38 games with injuries. Another backup center, Festus Ezeli, missed all 82 games after undergoing knee surgery. Iguodala missed 19 games with a hamstring injury and knee tendinitis. Power forward David Lee missed 13 games.

Lacob said the reasons behind Jackson’s termination were broader than the record or even the strategy he employed. He said Jackson’s relationship with the organization was less than “ideal.”

Put another way, Lacob indicated Jackson’s coaching career would be better served if he cultivated relationships beyond those involving his players and staff.

Read more on the Warriors from CSN Bay Area by clicking here.

Indeed, Lacob insisted he did not believe Jackson, in his third season as a coach, was tactically inferior to Clippers coach Doc Rivers, a veteran of 15 seasons on the bench.

Yet the Warriors brain trust – with Lacob and general manager Bob Myers at the top – unanimously decided they would be better off with another head coach.

“There is an element of that probably weighs on my thinking, certainly, and maybe on Bob’s, that there is the right coach for the right time and the right situation,” Lacob said. “And it’s our feeling at this point in time, that he’s probably not the right coach for us, going forward, given all of the circumstances.”

Andrew Bogut will not play second night of back-to-backs

Andrew Bogut

Andrew Bogut is back on an NBA court — he played 18 minutes for the Warriors in their season opener against Phoenix, hitting four of his six shots and adding six rebounds, generally playing pretty well.

But the Warriors are going to go slow with Bogut, not rush him back. They have to think long term.

So Bogut will not play in the second game of back-to-backs, at least not yet, Warriors coach Mark Jackson told Matt Steinmentz of CSNBayArea.com. So he will suit up against Memphis on Friday but not the Clippers on Saturday.

“Right now that’s the thinking,” Jackson said after Thursday’s practice. “That’s the way we’re going to go right now until something else happens. But we’re looking forward to him playing (vs. Memphis)….

“Just look at the schedule,” was how Jackson responded, when asked how those decisions are made. “That’s basically it. You look at this one. After a break (Thursday), we play tomorrow. So it makes sense. But we’ll also see how he feels the day of the game. If he comes in (Friday) and doesn’t feel right, then he won’t play. So, we’ll play it by ear and once again be true to the process.”

Golden State has its eyes on the playoffs, but it’s going to take both Bogut and Stephen Curry being healthy for around 70 games to make that happen. Taking it slow sounds good but the Warriors need Bogut to up his minutes as the season wears on.

The Warriors have a good problem at small forward

Harrison Barnes
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The Warriors, when the draft was approaching, were desperate for small forward help. They wanted an experienced player to “make the” at the position. They couldn’t find a star upgrade by trading the draft pick, so they picked up  Harrison Barnes. They still don’t have that star, but as it turns out, they have enough good young players to be able to feel good about the position. There’s not a clear starter, but that’s because they have multiple guys to fill the spot. This is usual preseason optimism, but it is notable that there’s a battle for the starting spot going on. From the Contra Costa Times:

Late last night, after the evening practice, I was talking with a source about the small forward competition. This source, who I trust and has seen every second of practice, said rookie Harrison Barnes has been special the first two practices. He went as far as saying “it’s Harrison Barnes’ job to lose.” Coming from him, it says something. Trust me.

Now, I’ve been considering Barnes a long shot of sorts in favor of easing him along, not putting too much pressure on him. We don’t get much practice, but allowing Barnes to develop methodically is a good plan. But it sounds like Barnes is having the kind of camp so far that makes him a serious contender to start. Admittedly, I was a bit surprised by the strong endorsement. Barnes has been flying under-the-radar lately and coach Mark Jackson has seemed pretty hesitant to tout him too hard. (Maybe that is a hint.) He praises him, but he usually quickly follows by pointing out it’s early or he hasn’t done it in games yet or he has a lot of room to grow.

via Uh Oh, Looks Like Harrison Barnes Isn’t Ready to Hand Over Starting Job – Inside the Warriors – with Marcus Thompson.

Oh, but wait, how about from three days ago from the San Francisco Chronicle?

Is Brandon Rush the early front-runner to be the Warriors’ starting small forward?

He was playing with the first unit Wednesday – when the team separated into clear first-, second- and third-unit groups for drills on the second day of training camp – but head coach Mark Jackson said not to read too much into the early pairings.

via Warriors’ Rush practices with 1st unit – SFGate.

Rush has worked his face off since leaving Indiana to save his career. He has great length and excellent shooting stroke. Barnes is no slouch when it comes to shooting, and the question is really how much offense he can produce.

Defense may end up deciding this thing. The Warriors have poured their heart and soul into transforming an offensive-centric team into a defensive-centric team, and wing defense is kind of important these days. Barnes is a rookie though, and looking good against guys you practice against day after day is entirely different from defending even Luol Deng and Andre Iguodala, much less LeBron James and Kevin Durant.

But it’s a good problem to have. They’ve got veteran experience and size in Richard Jefferson, youth and potential in Barnes, and shooting and athleticism in Rush. If Jackson can find the right fit, it’s yet another sign the Warriors may make some noise this season.