Tag: Mark Cuban

Dirk Nowitzki, Mike Scott

Cuban thinks Nowitzki can be elite three more years. Dirk not so sure.


It took a while after he recovered from knee surgery during training camp, but Dirk Nowizki is back to being his old self. In his last five games he’s averaged 19.6 points per game on 50.7 percent shooting and 52.6 percent from three. He’s pulling down 9.2 boards a game, too. Basically, All-Star numbers.

So how long can the 34-year-old keep going at this level?

Owner Mark Cuban told ESPNDallas.com he thinks a few more years (via SLAM).

“What we’re seeing now with Dirk is what we can expect to see next year and the year after, if he stays healthy,” Cuban said. “And the year after that.”

Three more seasons after this one. Up through age 37. At this level.

What does Dirk himself think of that?

“I’m not sure about all that,” said Nowitzki, a 15-year veteran who is averaging the fewest points (16.4) since his rookie year after missing the first 27 games of the season following arthroscopic surgery on his right knee. “We’ll just have to wait and see. Hopefully I can finish this season strong and have a good summer like I basically did last year with a lot of lifting and running and hopefully not have a setback with a surgery. We’ll see how consistent I can be again next season.”

Dirk may take half a step back, but for a few years he can be a part of a contending team, if the Mavericks can get the star free agent to go next to him. Problem is that is not likely this summer — don’ bet on Chris Paul or Dwight Howard moving teams, and after that the market takes a drop. On the other hand 2014 could be a deeper free agent group.

Which means it’s in Cuban’s interest to say his current star has a lot left in the tank.

Mark Cuban says David Stern was right to fine Spurs

Mavericks owner Cuban argues a call during NBA basketball game against Utah Jazz in Salt Lake City

Mark Cuban sticking up for David Stern. Maybe the Mayans were right, the end of the world might be nigh.

That said, Cuban will be quick to remind you that the NBA is a business. And the first rule of business is “the customer is always right.” When Gregg Popovich sat Tim Duncan, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili against the Miami Heat in a nationally televised game on Thursday, he was doing what was best for his team (resting older players in what was their fourth game in five nights).

But he disappointed a lot of customers — people who bought tickets and a national television audience. And David Stern came down hard on the Spurs because of those fans (for the most part, he was also sending a message to other teams).

Cuban told NBA.com he thinks Stern made the right move because you have to protect the television interest, the NBA’s “money train.”

“If he would have done the same thing the next night, it’d be a completely different conversation,” Cuban said. “Common sense. Recognize who pays your check.”

“Look, I respect the Spurs,” Cuban said. “Pop is the best coach in the league. I understand why he did it. I might even take the fine if it was us, but I understand why the league [fined the Spurs]. It maybe should have even been higher, because the amount at stake is enormous.”

But this is Cuban, you didn’t think he was going to let Stern completely off the hook, did you?

“It’s just as stupid to put a team in their fourth game in five nights on national television,” Cuban said. “That’s just as dumb. You’re not going to get as good of a performance, and that’s what you want to show. So I guess you can make the counter-argument that even though the Spurs did what they did. The league was just as guilty for putting them in that position, which was pretty stupid.”

Cuban isn’t all that worried about Nowitzki’s knee

Mark Cuban, Dirk Nowitzki

Dallas fans should be a little worried — maybe more than a little worried — about Dirk Nowitzki’s swollen knee and if he needs surgery. Because without him Dallas pretty much becomes the O.J. Mayo show, and no matter what you think of him this preseason that movie has been pretty ugly in the past when the games mattered.

Then again, Mark Cuban isn’t really worried.

He spoke to the Associated Press on Wednesday before the Mavericks played the Suns and sounded as comfortable as a guy in Sketchers relaxed step shoes.

“He went through it earlier in his career with his ankle, now his knee,” Cuban said. “We saw it last year and we dealt with it. We’ll deal with it again this year however we need to. He’s got the best training and medical staff in the league….

“Whatever is going happen, we’re going to be fine,” Cuban said. “We’ve been through this before many times.”

Cuban is a big picture guy, and in the big picture he set the Mavericks up to have max cap space this summer to chase after a major free agent to pair with Nowitzki. If the Mavs struggle and he gets a lottery pick to throw on next year’s team, all the better.

So, he’s not worried. But if Nowitzki has surgery and misses time the odds of the Mavs making the playoffs in a deep Western Conference just got smaller. Which is less than ideal for fans.

Deron Williams says Cuban not meeting with him helped “clinch” Nets deal

Dallas Mavericks owner Cuban reacts during the second half of their NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers in Dallas

UPDATE 4:55 pm: Mark Cuban and the Mavericks are in Spain for an exhibition game, but when reached by Tim MacMahon of ESPNDallas.com for a response to what Deron Williams said Cuban took the high road.

“I’m very happy with the ways thing turned out for the Mavs and wish DWill the best,” Cuban said via email from Barcelona, Spain, where the remodeled Mavs play an exhibition game Tuesday.

Also,  here is Deron Williams’ full quote:

“I think (Cuban) would have been able to answer a lot of the questions me and my agent have for him that really didn’t get answered that day pertaining to the future,” Williams told reporters. “And I think if he was there he would have been able to answer those questions a little bit better. It maybe would have helped me.

“(I wanted to hear about) the direction of the future of the team, other than Dirk. Players they were thinking about. Everything was basically just their track record, trust their track record, which is, you know, I can honor that, because they do have a good track record but it’s not enough for me, especially when [Nets general manager Billy King] was updating me daily.”

4:11 pm: When Deron Williams went as a free agent to meet with the Dallas Mavericks this summer — the only team he seriously talked to besides the Brooklyn Nets — Mark Cuban was not there.

As was much discussed in Dallas at the time, Cuban was off filming his television show “Shark Tank.” Cuban has discussed this a bunch of times, saying he had spoken to Williams and that he didn’t think it was a factor at all in Williams decision to sign in Brooklyn.

Williams said it did matter. From the twitter of Howard Beck of the New York Times.

Well. There you go. These things do matter.

Ultimately it probably didn’t make a difference — D-Will had pretty clearly been leaning Brooklyn from the start. He liked living in the city, he liked the marketing and other opportunities New York provides, he liked where the Nets were heading and he wanted to stay (plus, longer contract with more guaranteed money). He very likely was a Net no matter what.

But no Cuban may have killed whatever chance the Mavericks had.

Dirk Nowitzki calls flopping fines “a bunch of crap”


The new fines for flopping announced by the league are not very popular in Dallas.

First Mavericks owner Mark Cuban questioned the impact of the fines and what the fallout would be, and now Dirk Nowitzki has come out and questioned how the league will enforce the rules. From the Dallas Morning News (hat tip to SLAM):

“I never looked at myself as a big flopper,’’ Nowitzki said Thursday after the Mavericks arrived in Germany for their preseason opener on Saturday. “If you play me physical then, obviously, I got to sell the call and get to the (free-throw) line. That’s just part of the game. We’ll have to see how they enforce that.

“I think it’s a bunch of crap to be honest with you. Are they going to come back after a game and fine you for flopping? That’s tough to do to me.’’

Nowitzki, like Blake Griffin before him, is hitting on the key here — how will this be enforced? Where are the lines going to be drawn? It’s easy to point out the obvious flops — Greivis Vasquez cannot run over Reggie Evans and send him flying — but most of what gets called by fans as a flop is a case where there is contact but then a player sells that for a foul.

Where do you want to draw that line? Is how a player falls after contact a true indication of how hard the contact was? Can you really judge that from video?

We will see where they draw the line. But know Nowitzki is not on board.