Tag: Magic Celtics Game 3

NBA Playoffs, Magic Celtics Game 3: This one is on the Magic players


SVanGundy.jpgThe Orlando Magic got punched in the mouth. They fell to the ground. And they didn’t even try to get back up.

Let’s not take anything away from the Celtics, they came out hungry, they came out wanting to end it. And they did. Well, sure, they still have to play one more game, but the Celtics came out and played like a team ready for the Finals and a banner. The Magic played like a team ready to go home.

This was not about Xs and Os adjustments, that was Game 1. The Celtics came out with their plan, by Game 2 the Magic came back with their adjustments. But it is moot for Stan Van Gundy to draw up changes when the players don’t execute. The inside-out offense doesn’t work when you shoot 26 percent from three. This wasn’t about strategy.

The Magic need to ask where their fight was. They may have lost anyway, but they rolled over and played dead.

“It seemed like tonight our bodies was here but our minds wasn’t,” Dwight Howard said in a televised press conference on NBATV after the game. “It seems like our hearts wasn’t there, too.”

The Magic were one of the two best executing teams in the Association this season — they ran their offense beautifully (Utah was the only other team that did that). But in Game 1 in this series the Celtics got physical, and when knocked off their game the Magic looked lost. They never fought back.

Tonight Boston took their effort to a new level. And Orlando…

“I thought there were several in the first half, hustle plays like that all went their way,” Van Gundy in his televised interview. “I mean they were a step ahead of us on every play. I though they worked harder than we did. I thought they out competed us.”

Van Gundy tried to throw himself on the sword in his post game press conference, but this is not really on him. Maybe there were little things he could have done — go to JJ Redick a bit earlier, for example — but when a team comes out flat for an Eastern Conference Finals game that is on the players. Howard admitted as much.

There needs to be accountability in the Magic locker room — and that starts with Howard and the other leaders.

“What I said to them after the game was there are a lot of guys in this room that have worked very hard to bring this franchise up a long way… to make this team to where it is a contender, to where it has gained respect and everything else,” Van Gundy said. “And that game out there tonight, not just the score but the way it went tonight is disappointing because that is not who we are, that is not who we worked so hard to become.

“Between right now and Monday night there is going to be a lot of soul searching, a lot of pulling together. The easiest thing to do, for anybody to do when things go badly is to escape…. And try to escape blame as much as you can so it goes to someone else. It takes very mentally mature people to stand up and say no, I’m a part of this…

“If we don’t have that kind of toughness, we shouldn’t be here anyway.”

It doesn’t look like they do. And that is on the players.

NBA Playoffs, Celtics Magic Game 3: Live Chat

NBA Playoffs Celtics Magic Game 3: Where losing momentum is about the only Celtics concern

Leave a comment

TAllen.jpgNBA coaches tend to operate like a lazy politician — they use fear. Scare the team by showing them their mistakes and the consequences, press the buttons on their fear of failure (or threaten their playing time), motivate them to work and focus to avoid that.

Doc Rivers has to find another way — there’s not much he’d want to change about the first two games of the Eastern Conference Finals. The games were close, but the Celtics defense was fantastic and they closed out games on the road. They are up 2-0. About the only thing the Celtics have to worry about is a loss of momentum. So we’ll try to play that up.

In the last round against the Cleveland Cavaliers, the Celtics got a momentum turning win at Quicken Loans Arena, tying the series at 1-1 heading back to Boston. Everything was going the Celtics way…

Except for the schedule. They had to take three days off, a game on Monday and the next one on Friday. Momentum took a holiday. The Cavaliers came into Boston and smacked the home team around good, winning by 29.

Now in the Eastern Conference Finals, Boston went on the road and momentum was all theirs — they took two games from the Magic. Boston’s defense slowed Orlando’s perimeter players, Kendrick Perkins and friends have played the mighty Dwight Howard man-up pretty well. Everything is going the Celtics way…

Except for the schedule. Three days off again.

Frankly, it’s just not much to worry about. The Celtics are coming home and it’s much more likely they sweep the Celtics than lose four out of five.

But the Magic remain a dangerous team. They did not get an invite straight to this round, they swept out two teams to get here (including a Hawks team that had a better record than the Celtics). Ignore them and start thinking about the Lakers at your own peril. What you don’t want to do is have a game that gives the Magic hope.

At home, Boston can try to push the pace a little on offense — get some turnovers and have Rajon Rondo convert that to easy buckets. At home, the Celtics role players should step up and provide more. They should get some bench play.

Defensively… don’t change a thing. Keep the Magic in the halfcourt, play Howard with just one man (who cares if he scores 30 again?) and stay home on the perimeter shooters. Don’t let them start driving into the lane for easy buckets, keep defending the rim.

Just keep doing what they have been doing. And keep momentum on their side.

NBA Playoffs, Magic v. Celtics: Matt Barnes says what we already know about Paul Pierce


There are various degrees of flopping. There are players that “flop” strictly as a way to exaggerate contact in order to get a call they rightfully deserve. There are others who flop as a way to validate a smart play, like when the how every player that draws a charge isn’t just knocked over, but sent sliding across the floor. Then there are those who create fouls from nothing, and through a scream of pain, a flailing of limbs, and often a fall, some players are able to completely manipulate the referees into seeing something that flat-out didn’t happen.

Then on another level entirely is Baron Davis’ flop against Mehmet Okur in 2007, which is just tremendous.

Paul Pierce is a fantastic player, but the infuriating thing about him is that he stands (or falls?) amongst the most egregious floppers. It’s one thing for Paul to exaggerate a bump on the way to the rim, but the way he collapses on the floor after minimal incidental contact or pretends to be hit in the head while shooting seems like it should be beneath him. He’s honestly too good of a player to be compensating like that.

Matt Barnes, who has become intimately familiar with Pierce’s…gamesmanship, talked a bit about Paul and his ability to manufacture foul calls. From Tania Ganguli of the Orlando Sentinel:

Pierce can be a maddening player for opposing teams.

His ability to score and to draw fouls are among his strengths. Both
California guys, Barnes knows Pierce’s game well. And while some of
Pierce’s antics annoy Barnes, he said he doesn’t “go for” some of what
Pierce tries to do, he couldn’t deny Pierce’s effectiveness.

“My third foul in the third quarter, when I tried to beat him over
the screen, he fell down like I threw him,” Barnes said, when asked
about Pierce’s tendency to exaggerate contact. “It was ridiculous. But
the refs called it, so it was a good play. It was a flop, 100 percent,
and that’s how some guys like to play. But if the refs call it, it’s

Barnes’ quote applies more to a singular incident of Pierce’s flopping than a general trend, but his point stands. However, that doesn’t mean I’m here on a holy crusade to rid the world of the flopping abomination. That’s the problem, actually. No matter how much we rant and rave, there isn’t a convenient solution to get rid of this kind of play. Pierce will continue to go on rewarded for what he does, and there’s really not much the NBA can do about it.

Start giving technical fouls for flopping? Well, that relies on refs correctly identifying the flopping in the first place in the course of a game, which they’re clearly not doing. Fine players for flopping? It can be obvious like in that Baron Davis clip, but there’s pretty much no bright line on what constitutes flopping, and assessing who’s to be fined would be a hell of a judgment call.

Rather it’s just to reference what Paul is doing, shake my head in disgust, and maybe even laugh at him a bit. There are players in this league who need to sell calls in order to elevate their value and earn their next big payday. Pierce is not such a player, and it’s interesting to note that despite Paul’s hubris, he still thinks he needs to be.

NBA Playoffs Magic v. Celtics: J.J. Redick making it tough for Magic to keep him off the floor


nba_redick.jpgAlthough the Orlando Magic have struggled at times in their series against the Boston Celtics, they need not despair. It’s never good to drop two games on your home court in the playoffs, especially in consecutive contests in the series’ opening games.

Still, Orlando has lost two games by a combined seven points against a team on an obscene roll. It makes winning the series incredibly difficult, sure, but for as well as the Celtics have played and as poorly as the Magic have at times, the slim scoring margin between the two has to be seen as reason for optimism.

The key is for Stan Van Gundy and his staff to identify the most problematic areas and the Magic players to adjust before its too late. In a seven-game series, changes in approach and execution are only as influential as the time at which they’re implemented. Everyone within the Magic organization can only hope that there’s still time to implement a change, go about making the necessary adjustment, and do their best to perform beginning with Game 3.

One possible adjustment is to yank the injured Matt Barnes from the starting lineup, and replace him with the far more effective J.J. Redick.

Just by watching the flow of the Magic offense, you can notice a significant difference between when Redick is in the game compared to when he is not. It’s as much about what Redick does as it is about what Barnes doesn’t (or can’t, with his injury). Revisit the video from Game 2, and you’ll not only see Redick contributing off the ball on both ends (either by chasing Ray Allen around screens or making his defender chase him), but also with the ball in his hands or the hands of his defensive assignment.

The only situation in which Redick seemed to struggle was in a temporary lapse of judgment that cost the Magic a proper look at a game-tying three-pointer. That play was an outlier. It was a bout of temporary insanity for a player that has played very well this season and has carved out a place in the NBA by working and making the right play.

Don’t trust me? I’d like to point your attention to an excellent piece by Ben Q. Rock of the Orlando Pinstriped Post, who used a combination of Redick-centric stats as evidence of J.J.’s impact. When you look at his production relative to Barnes’, the decision to start Redick doesn’t even seem debatable.

This is a player that’s giving the Magic the best chance to win by playing with the starting unit, and even though Stan Van Gundy has displayed an unwillingness to alter his starting five (while still praising Redick’s impact, mind you), the most important thing is that SVG continues to employ this incredibly successful lineup for serious minutes. Redick has forced the adjustment with his play, and J.J.’s 34 Game 2 minutes should establish a trend for the remainder of the series.