Tag: Luke Walton

LeBron James,

Baseline-to-Baseline recaps: Kings take Heat two overtimes


Welcome to PBT’s roundup of yesterday’s NBA games. Or, what you missed while scrolling through the Florida Man twitter feed….

Heat 141, Kings 129 (2OT): What looked like a blowout on paper ended up being the best game of the night. The Kings may deny it was a moral victory for them, but it was. They were scrappy all night, they played with a fight you wish we had seen all season. It LeBron James taking over in the second overtime with 11 points in 3 assists to get Miami it’s 12th straight win.

I don’t know that you can say Marcus Thornton outplayed the Heat’s wing players but he had 36 points of his own, while Tyreke Evans had 26 and Isaiah Thomas added 14 — they consistently got into the paint and knocked down shots. Then there was DeMarcus Cousins, who overpowered the Heat front line at points and had 24 points.

By the way, your mind blowing LeBron stat of the night is not his line of 40 points, 16 assists and 8 rebounds. No, it’s that by shooting 14-of-23 he becomes the first player to shoot 64 percent in a calendar month (minimum of 200 shots) since Kareem Abdul-Jabbar did it in 1983.

Pacers 108, Warriors 97: Hey, there was a basketball game to go with the fight. Although who wants to talk about anything but the fight? Roy Hibbert is going to miss at least a game for throwing Stephen Curry around like he is half his size… well he is, but Hibbert still can’t just throw him around like that during a shoving match.

After that incident, when the Pacers were already up 10, it was David West who took over and made sure the Pacers held on for their fifth straight double-digit win. West finished with 28, George Hill had 23 and both he and Curry — who may have been the best player on the floor and finished with 38 points — seemed to score at will on difficult shots. In the end the Pacers were simply too much.

Magic 98, Sixers 84: Philadelphia has reached a new low. But don’t take my word for it, ask Philly coach Doug Collins.

After leading 29-20 the Sixers coasted while the Magic (as they have most of the season) played hard for Jacque Vaughn. Six Orlando players were in double figures, led by Tobias Harris and Arron Afflalo with 16. Former Sixer Nikola Vucevic finished with 12 points and 19 rebounds. Meanwhile for Philly everyone was off: Jrue Holiday shot 4-for-11, Thaddeus Young was 4-of-11 also, Nick Young finished 1-for-6 and Evan Turner was 2-for-7. It wasn’t pretty. Ask Doug Collins.

Cavaliers 101, Bulls 96: In an alternate universe where Kyrie Irving and Derrick Rose are healthy this game is a lot more interesting.

Chicago finally put up some points but this time their usually stout defense couldn’t stop the Cavaliers most of the game. Especially when it mattered. A Kirk Hinrich three made it a one-point game inside three minutes. But the Cavaliers answered with a couple of buckets from Dion Waiters (who finished with 25), and a bucket from Luke Walton might have been the dagger. Actually, the Dagger was with 15 seconds left when a hustling Walton stole a lazy Carlos Boozer inbound pass.

Nets 101, Hornets 97: Brooklyn thought this was a game they would be able to sit their starters the fourth quarter and relax. They took the lead with a 9-0 run early in the first quarter, had that all the way up to 22 in the second quarter and thought they had a laugher. But the Hornets got serious on defense (the Nets shot just 35.9 percent in the second half) and chipped away until this was as close as a two-point ballgame late.

Deron Williams took charge and scored the Nets last 11 points to secure the win, and he finished with 33 points and 8 assists. Brook Lopez added 20 points and Keith Bogans was key late with three from beyond the arc. Greivis Vasquez had 20 to lead the Hornets.

Bucks 95, Mavericks 90: This was a vintage Dirk Nowitzki performance — 21 points and 20 rebounds. He seemed to do everything. But with this Mavericks roster that is just not enough some nights. Monta Ellis had 11 fourth quarter points (22 for the game) and sparked Milwaukee to finish the game on a 12-2 run and get the win. J.J. Redick was second on the Bucks with 14 points. Losses like this kill any Dallas playoff dreams.

Clippers 106, Bobcats 84: You wouldn’t know it from the final score but this was a close game with the Bobcats leading much of the first half. But the Bobcats got away from the cardinal rule of beating the Clippers — take away the easy dunks in transition — late in the first half and a few Blake Griffin dunks fired up the team. A late 15-3 first half run by the Clippers was the beginning of the end. Griffin had 24 points, Chris Paul finished with 13 assists and the Clippers rolled to a win.

Suns 84, Timberwolves 83 (OT): Well, somebody had to win this game. The Suns led by as many as 18 in the first half but the Timberwolves guards sparked runs in the fourth quarter to make it close — J.J. Barea had 12 points and Ricky Rubio had 7 assists in the fourth quarter alone.

The overtime was close the entire way but a P.J. Tucker fast-break layup gave Minnesota a four-point lead. The teams traded buckets then a Derrick Williams three made it a one-point game. The Suns tried to ice it but Nikola Pekovic blocked a Wesley Johnson shot and the Timberwolves got one final shot at it. Alexey Shved drove the lane but his contested layup rolled off the rim and the Suns hung on for the win.

Three Stars of the Night: An Odd Scoring Battle

Brook Lopez, Kyrie Irving
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With 22 teams in action, you’d expect the usual suspects to be the big scorers of the night. Guys like LeBron James, Kevin Durant, and James Harden. The guys battling Kobe Bryant for the scoring title. Those guys.

Nope! Saturday was a little bit wild and crazy, and as a result we had Luis Scola balling out and dropping 33 and 10 on the Timberwolves while Nikola Pekovic smashed his way to 28. We saw David West (29 points) continue to do his share of the scoring while Roy Hibbert (21 minutes, zero points) went missing yet again. The Jrue Holiday show raged on with 29 points and a near triple-double, but actually, Holiday’s 7 turnovers almost gave him the rare quadruple-double-trouble, which really would have set the evening off nicely.

Instead, it seems like we’ll have to settle for a scoring battle between an awkward 7-footer who loves comic books and shoots a set-shot and a reserve forward who averages 8.5 points a game on his career. It’s weird, it’s hard to explain, and it’s Three Stars:

Third Star: C.J. Miles – (33 points, 8-for-10 from 3-point land)

Look, guys, I don’t know either. C.J. Miles is a career 41 percent shooter from the field and a career 33 percent shooter from behind the arc. This should not be happening, but Miles has a really weird habit of getting hot and then suddenly morphing into this unstoppable offensive force. You either believe in the hot hand theory or you don’t, but everyone watching tonight knew Miles was hot. He was catching passes and firing away like he was Ray Allen whenever he had a look at the basket, never hesitating once to think, “I’m C.J. Miles.” It got to the point where the announcers were preaching the importance of keeping the ball out of the hands of C.J. Miles, which feels absurd to even type. Whatever it was, Miles and his 33-point explosion kept the shorthanded Cavs in it, even with Luke Walton on the floor for 30 minutes. While this may come as surprise to exactly no one, eight 3-pointers is indeed a career high for Miles. He was stupid good tonight.

Second Star: Russell Westbrook – (28 points, 8 rebounds, 8 assists)

Ah, a nice return to normalcy, both for Westbrook and for Three Stars. With Kevin Durant unable to get it going early on, Westbrook took the scoring load on his shoulders and blew past Houston’s defense all night. Westbrook may get criticized for taking an inordinate amount of jumpers off his own dribble, but when he’s scoring at the rim and those jumpers are falling, he instantly morphs into one of the more unstoppable players in all of basketball. Westbrook’s jumper has sort of abandoned him to start the season, but it was certainly falling tonight.

First Star: Brook Lopez – (35 points, 11 rebounds)

Lopez was an absolute monster against the Varejao-less Cavs, as he scored a whopping 11 field goals in the paint and went to the free-throw line 11 times as well. While Lopez may not be considered fleet of foot, he’s a load on the low block and around the rim, especially against a rail-thin big man like rookie center Tyler Zeller. That’s not to take anything away from Lopez — he showed his usual soft touch and he gobbled up some offensive rebounds, something he doesn’t always do. Perhaps it’s because of the time he missed due to injury this year or because of the other distractions in Brooklyn right now, but Lopez has been posting some pretty incredible numbers with very little fanfare. His rebounding percentages are back to respectable levels, his PER is really solid at 24.5, and he’s averaging 22 points per 36 minutes on 51 percent shooting. Lopez probably isn’t regarded as a player you would build an offense around, but he’s a better option for that than Deron Williams is right now. That’s something to keep in mind, especially if post-oriented coaches like Phil Jackson or Mike Dunleavy do end up in Brooklyn. Lopez, even with that hideously effective set-shot off the glass from 18-feet, is the best bet for consistent offensive production the Nets have.

Details of potential Dwight Howard trade leaking. Magic get Lopez, picks.

Orlando Magic v New York Knicks

UPDATE 4:54 pm: The Clippers may be the fourth team in the deal, reports both Ken Berger at CBSSports.com and Chad Ford at ESPN. The Clippers would send a first round pick to the Nets for MarShon Brooks, then the Nets would ship that pick to the Magic as part of the deal.

This appears to be getting very close.

Here is the deal as ESPN describes it now:

According to sources the Nets would receive Howard, Jason Richardson, Chris Duhon and Earl Clark in the proposed deal. The Magic would get Brook Lopez in a sign-and-trade, Luke Walton, Damion James, Shelden Williams, Armon Johnson and three first-round picks — two from the Nets and a lottery protected first from the Clippers. The Cavs would get Kris Humphries in a sign-and-trade, Quentin Richardson, Sundiata Gaines, a first round pick from the Nets and three million in cash. The Clippers would receive MarShon Brooks.

2:26 pm: We start with this disclaimer — this deal is not yet approved. And complex deals can fall apart fast.

But this one is picking up steam and details of what the Dwight Howard three-team trade involving the Nets and Cavaliers might be are starting to leak out.

The deal remains in flux, but Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports (and who you can see on the NBC Sports Network tonight) broke down the details of the trade as of right now.

In the proposed deal, Howard, Jason Richardson and Earl Clark would be sent to Brooklyn, and the Magic would receive the Nets’ Brook Lopez, Damion James, Sheldon Williams, Cleveland’s Luke Walton and three future first-round picks, sources said. Cleveland would receive Orlando’s Quentin Richardson, Brooklyn’s Sundiata Gaines, Kris Humphries (on a one-year guaranteed deal), a first-round pick and $3 million from the Nets. Brooklyn also would send (MarShon) Brooks to a fourth team to get them an additional first-round pick to send to the Magic.

Both teams will want their doctors to examine the other key people in this trade — the Nets want to look at Howard’s back, the Magic at Lopez’s foot.

Even after that there are a lot of questions. Will Humphries sign a one-year deal in Cleveland or will he demand the security of a multi-year deal. Will Brooks agree to sign wherever he might land? What kind of picks can the Nets get for MarShon Brooks?

Then the big one, is this the best the Magic can do?

It’s a whole lot less than the Hornets were able to get back for Chris Paul.

You never get equal value trading an NBA superstar. There are maybe 10 (Bobcats GM Rich Cho will say less than that) in the NBA and you need one or more to win. When you get one, you fight not to let him go. And if you have to move him you never get equal value because you’re not getting another franchise anchor back.

But the question becomes, how much can you get back? What is enough?

That’s the question Orlando’s front office is weighing.

The Nets are pushing for it because if they land Howard to go with Deron Williams and Joe Johnson, they are a powerhouse title contender.

Josh Childress sets dubious free throw record

Golden State Warriors vs Phoenix Suns

Josh Childress, the former Hawk sixth man who bolted for Greece and was coaxed back to the NBA by Phoenix, wasn’t impressive this season and fell out of the rotation with the Suns (at least until Grant Hill got injured).

But that didn’t stop him from setting a dubious record this season, something pointed out by Paul Coro at the Arizona Republic.

Childress played in 34 games, totaling 491 minutes, and never made a single free throw all season. He was 0-2 from the stripe for the 2012, his lone chance coming in February against New Orleans when he was fouled on an offensive rebound put back. He missed them both.

Childress has never been a guy drawing a lot of contact — with the Hawks he usually averaged about 3.7 free throws a game (give or take), last season with the Suns that fell to 1.1 attempts per game. This year that fell off the table. This is not Andris Biedrins part two — Childress shoots 78 percent from the line, he’s not avoiding contact because he fears the stripe. He’s just avoiding contact.

This was quite the season for guys drawing blanks at the stripe. Second place all time now belongs to Luke Walton who played 364 minutes without a free throw this season. The record had belonged to Dominic Maguire played with his 307 minutes in the ’09-10 season.

By the way, don’t be shocked if Phoenix amnesties Childress.

Weekend Observations: 25 notes about the trade deadline

Cleveland Cavaliers v Los Angeles Lakers

We’re thee days past the trade deadline. Some players have already landed and played a game with their new teams, some haven’t even arrived in their new destinations (does Hasheem Thabeet really have that busy of a calendar?). But we’re starting to recover from the shock of a still-nuts-if-quieter-than-last-year deadline that saw two coaches let go the same week so many players switched laundry.

With that in mind, here are 25 things that came to mind from the decisions made in the past week.

1. So many “nothing to lose deals.” Sam Young to Philly, Leandro Barbosa to Indiana, and in part, Ramon Sessions to L.A..

2. The Cavs’ move of Ramon Sessions in terms of how you view it essentially comes down to whether you believe that the market for Sessions was good enough to get better or not. It’s easy to say that Chris Grant got poor return on what is considered a starter-quality point guard as a reserve (a position of leverage), but the point guard market was simply pretty weak at the deadline. Raymond Felton was a player mentioned repeatedly and that’s only because Portland would have sold off children to get rid of him.

3. What sold me on the trade for Cleveland was the pick swap in 2013. Should the Lakers continue to regress given that they have yet to make a significant move and both Kobe Bryant and Pau Gasol will be a year older, there’s a good chance that the Cavs could see their second draft pick in 2013 move up from 28-30 all the way to somewhere between 18 and 20. A ten-spot bump can be the difference between a training camp flameout and a quality rotation player.

4. I do hate them taking on the extra money from Luke Walton’s extra year. It doesn’t hurt because of their cap situation, I just hate the idea of a team that isn’t primed to contend with dead money.

5. What exactly did George Karl do to God? He seems like a good man, a good father, has tried to live his life well and coach his players responsibly. Why has God responded by giving him Carmelo Anthony, J.R. Smith and JaVale McGee inside of two years?

6. John Wall had to have been skipping when he found out he was getting Nene. “A real live NBA player!”

7. Flip Saunders is somewhere going “Now you get veterans. I get it.”

8. Nick Young’s not a bad pick-up for the Clippers, he just doesn’t solve any of the significant issues they have in front of them. The bleeding won’t stop because of Nick Young.

9. The Warriors were always going to make a move like they did in the Monta Ellis trade. They’ve been in pursuit of a defensive change to their culture for a year now. That’s why Mark Jackson was brought in. New ownership doesn’t want the fun and gun identity the Warriors have had. It’s going to take time and several moves to get a new mindset installed but adding Bogut, however healthy he is, is a good start.

10. For the Bucks, one thing that you have to hope Scott Skiles will do is post Monta Ellis. He’s a surprisingly killer post player and with the offensive putback bigs the Bucks have, a forced miss could be okay if they crash effectively.

11. There’s been a lot of hand-wringing over Ellis playing next to Brandon Jennings. But considering there rampant talks of moving Jennings, it doesn’t seem like the Bucks are sold on him long-term. The real challenge is Skiles getting Ellis to commit defensively.

12. The Lakers have never been big on sentimentality. So moving Derek Fisher shouldn’t stand as a monster shock for them. Ownership has long put the emphasis on the greatness of the team and its legacy rather than any individual player.

13. In unrelated news, Kobe Bryant is making $30 million in two years when the new CBA’s most punitive tax measures kick in and the team still hasn’t used its amnesty clause.

14. Mitch Kupchak was criticized for not amnestying Luke Walton and for the Jason Kapono contract. Then he managed to move both players and a pick they inevitably will not need for a significant upgrade. It’s like teams just line up to take the Lakers’ roster flotsam and jetsam.

15. Jordan Hill’s a better pick-up than considered, also. He’s not going to dominate at any time on the floor, but he’s a quality rebounder with some athleticism, the area they were really missing the most.

16. This is the team that has made D.J. MBenga and Josh Powell look capable, after all.

17. How did the Blazers not move Raymond Felton or Jamal Crawford? How do you have the two most unhappiest, most disruptive, arguably best value trade assets and not move either one? Or are those things related? Taking dirt-for-dollars on Felton likely would have been the best move for both sides.

18. But getting the Nets’ pick was genius. They sent them a player which can only help to make them slightly better but not significantly better, meaning they have a great chance at even the 4th pick, especially if one team leaps them in the lottery. That could work out disastrously for the Nets, who need to tank, violently.

19. New Jersey: “Well, we didn’t get Dwight yet, which means that our massive gamble of our long-term future failed and we’re facing losing Deron Williams after giving up all that for him in the trade to get him. I know! Let’s double down, mortgage more of our future, and do it for a player who if he opts in, costs us cap space and if he doesn’t means we have an even worse team to try and lure Deron back. Great!”

20. Gregg Popovich would have had to think about acquiring Stephen Jackson for about 35 seconds. Jackson doesn’t have to shoot well, doesn’t have to score a lot, just has to defend and wait for open shots. He can’t disrupt the locker room and he won’t fight with Popovich because of the respect he has. It works for both sides.

21. Detroit reportedly tried to move Ben Gordon and Charlie Villanueva. Should have tried harder. They’re among a handful of teams that should have done a deal at the deadline.

22. There were discussions to move D.J. Augustin to OKC according to a report from Oklahoma TV. That would have been the ultimate Thunder one-up of the Lakers on their grab of Sessions.

23. Richard Jefferson was in uniform and played Saturday night. Same for Barbosa. It doesn’t matter how they played. It’s the matter of professionalism. A lot of other, younger players still haven’t shown up for their teams yet.

24. There was a brief moment in time when the Blazers had on roster Hasheem Thabeet and Greg Oden. Let that sink in.

25. When Dwight Howard say he was just happy that “it’s over,” I wanted to know just what exactly he thought was over. Because in two months when the Magic are eliminated in the second round, the whole thing starts over again. Yay.