Tag: Luke Walton

Kobe Bryant, Luke Walton

Monday And-1 Links: Luke Walton wants another shot in NBA


Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points.

• Luke Walton spent most of last season on the Cleveland bench (he got in 50 games) and, when he couldn’t get picked up for this season by anyone, landed a gig as a studio analyst on the Lakers broadcasts. Not bad. But he told ESPNLosAngeles.com what he really wants is to get back in the NBA.

“I want to play still,” said Walton, who has already met with the Lakers’ D-League affiliate, the L.A. D-Fenders, to discuss fulfilling a player development role that will allow him to work out with the team along with his TV duties. “I’ve trained all summer as if I was going to get a call. The call never came, so, I’m going to keep working out … If nothing happens this year, then I’ll probably admit that it’s officially over.”

• J.J. Redick, who has missed all of training camp with a bruised left quad, was back on the practice court for the Clippers Monday. Good sign for that team.

• In other news the Clippers waived Brandon Davies. Their roster is down to 15 now.

• The Clippers are going to be part of the NBA’s opening night — and TNT is going to broadcast its pre/post game show that night from the streets of New York City. Charles Barkley, Shaquille O’Neal, Kenny Smith and Ernie Johnson will broadcast live from Flatiron Plaza on opening night, part of a promotion with NBA 2K14.

• This is a fantastic look by Zach Harper at the impact of stretch fours on a team’s defense. Some are better than others. As you would expect LeBron James and Dirk Nowitizki fare well in the comparison, but Steve Novak and Metta World Peace do as well.

• Speaking of quality NBA writing, J.A. Adande hit the nail on the head talking about Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen and loyalty.

• Another story, and a good one, about the fall of former Georgetown star Victor Page.

• An entire tumblr dedicated to people yelling at Mario Chalmers.

• As expected by everyone, the Pelicans picked up the options on Anthony Davis and Austin Rivers.

• Utah Jazz rookie center Rudy Gobert may be a 7’1″ Frenchman, but that doesn’t mean he wouldn’t look good with some sparkly nail polish… that or he’s getting hazed by the team veterans. Probably the latter.

Quote of the Day: Terrell Owens thinks he could play in NBA

17th Annual Hooters International Swimsuit Pageant

“I could play, I’m better than Luke Walton!”

—Former NFL wide receiver Terrell Owens, appearing on ESPN’s Sports Nation.

Should we tell Owens that Luke Walton isn’t in the NBA right now? He doesn’t even have a training camp invite this season, his 10-year NBA career could be done.

Or to put it in SAT form: Luke Walton is to the NBA as Terrell Owens is to the NFL right now.

I could get into the whole “even the worst NBA player is so much better than you think” discussion, but I’m just not up for it. Go find the YouTube of Brian Scalabrine taking on random people.

Chauncey Billups wins inaugural NBA Teammate of the Year award

Chauncey Billups

Whether he was in uniform or in a suit on the sidelines as he recovered from a torn Achilles, a lot of Clippers players would turn to Chauncey Billups for advice. How to deal with certain defenses, how to cover particular players, whatever it was he was like another assistant coach for the team.

So it is fitting that he is the winner or the inaugural Twyman-Stokes Award for Best NBA teammate.

“I’m just very honored to be the first recipient of such a prestigious award…” Billups said. “I think more importantly this is about being a good person. There will be others up here in the next years who will be very deserving.”

There were 12 finalists for the award: Jerry Stackhouse (Brooklyn Nets), Luke Walton (Cleveland Cavaliers), Andre Iguodala (Denver Nuggets), Jarrett Jack (Golden State Warriors), Roy Hibbert (Indiana Pacers), Chauncey Billups (Los Angeles Clippers), Shane Battier (Miami Heat), Roger Mason, Jr. (New Orleans Hornets), Jason Kidd (New York Knicks), Serge Ibaka (Oklahoma City Thunder), Manu Ginobili (San Antonio Spurs), and Emeka Okafor (Washington Wizards).

So yes, this is pretty much the “veteran leadership award.” The way it is picked is… interesting. A group of legendary NBA players (that’s how the league described them) put together the list of a dozen candidates. Then NBA players vote on the award, however they can’t vote for anyone on their own team. To make this simple: The list is put together by and then voted on guys not in the locker room with the player that wins. Outsiders peering in get to decide the best teammate.

Not that Billups doesn’t deserve the award.

“Chauncey Billups defines what this award was designed to recognize, a player committed to his club, his teammates and his community,” NBA Commissioner David Stern said. “He has mentored and guided countless young players to adopt his selfless attitude, dedication, passion for our game and to respect the history and example of players like Jack Twyman and Maurice Stokes.”

This is going to be an annual award. With the trophy comes a $25,000 donation to the charity of the winner’s choice.

The award is officially called the Twyman-Stokes award, after Jack Twyman and Maurice Stokes. Those two guys were rookies together on the 1956 Cincinnati Royals and the teammates both went on to be All-Stars and Stokes was the Rookie of the Year. In the last game of his third season Stokes fell and suffered a major head injury in a game — he was in a coma and was paralyzed because of it. Back in the day players didn’t make that much money (Twyman’s rookie contract was for $20,000 a year) and the team didn’t pick up the expenses, so Twyman did. He became Stokes legal guardian, put together charity games featuring the biggest stars of the day (Wilt Chamberlain, Oscar Robertson and others) and also helped get the team to pick up costs for being injured on the job.