Tag: Louis Amundson

Kenyon Martin

Report: Kenyon Martin to meet with Bucks head coach Jason Kidd; Cavaliers also interested


Kenyon Martin played for the Knicks last season, but was limited to just 32 appearances due to injury.

At Summer League in Las Vegas, Martin said he was feeling “night and day” from the way he did while battling ankle issues last year, and expressed hope that he would return to the Knicks this season.

But 30 games in, he remains unemployed.

Martin has had conversations with the Rockets and the Grizzlies, but received no commitments as a result. An upcoming meeting with a former teammate, however, may be his best chance of catching on with someone for the remainder of the season.

From Charles F. Gardner of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

A source confirmed Tuesday that Kidd has a meeting scheduled with NBA veteran Kenyon Martin, a former teammate of Kidd’s with the New Jersey Nets.

The source characterized the discussions as preliminary but the Bucks are lean at the power forward position due to the season-ending injury suffered by rookie Jabari Parker and several injuries (broken nose, concussion) to veteran power forward Ersan Ilyasova. Center Larry Sanders also has been out the past three games due to illness but is expected back fairly soon.

The Bucks are at the league maximum of 15 players and would have to create a roster spot if they decide to sign Martin.

The lack of a roster spot appears to be the biggest hurdle to Milwaukee inking Martin, even to a 10-day contract which teams can offer beginning Jan. 5.

Nate Wolters and Kendall Marshall are the only ones in place who don’t have any guaranteed money owed to them beyond this season. But Marshall plays regular minutes in the rotation, and it’s unclear if Milwaukee would be interested in giving up on a second-year player like Wolters simply to take a chance on a veteran like Martin whose ability to produce at this stage of his career his questionable, at best.

Meanwhile, Marc Spears of Yahoo Sports reports that the Cavaliers may also be interested in obtaining Martin’s services.

The Cavaliers also have some interest in Martin, a source said. Cleveland, however, is not in a rush to replace injured forward-center Anderson Varejao, who was recently lost for the season because of a torn Achilles’ tendon. If the Cavaliers do decide to open a roster spot to replace Varejao, either guard A.J. Price, forward Louis Amundson or center Alex Kirk is expected to be waived, a source said. Martin, who has averaged 12.5 points and 6.9 rebounds in a 14-year career, recently expressed interest in playing for Cleveland after Varejao was injured.

This really comes down to just how capable Martin is of contributing. If he looks good in workouts, once the 10-day contract option becomes available to teams next week, it’s likely that someone gives him a shot.

Cavaliers center Anderson Varejao tears Achilles, done for season

Minnesota Timberwolves v Cleveland Cavaliers

This sucks.

Cleveland’s starting center Anderson Varejao tore his Achilles tendon in the third quarter of a Cavaliers win over Minnesota, something first reported by Brian Windhorst of ESPN and since confirmed by multiple other outlets.

This is what the Cavaliers feared after the injury happened. Varejao was averaging 10 points a game on 55 percent shooting, plus he grabbed six rebounds a game. He’s often the big setting the pick for LeBron James out high, those two have a strong chemistry.

Varejao landed awkwardly after going up near the basket Tuesday night and immediately went to the ground, where he stayed for several minutes with his teammates around him. He was eventually carried back to the locker room unable to put any weight on his leg, and was seen leaving the arena on crutches an in a boot.

For the 32-year-old Varejao, this will be a very difficult injury to come back from. It could spell the end of his NBA career.

It’s also going to be rough on Cleveland on the court. In the short term expect the Cavaliers to start Tristan Thompson, who has played well of late, in what is a smaller lineup. The only other option right now is to give Brendan Haywood minutes — he has barely seen the court this season (four total minutes in the last seven games) and is really more contract trade bait than player to the Cavs. There is Louis Amundson on the bench, too.

Which means expect the Cavaliers to really step up their efforts to trade for a big man. They have been working the phones all season going down the ladder of potential trade partners, including guys like Timofey Mozgov in Denver, Kosta Koufos in Memphis, and now Brandan Wright in Boston. All to no avail.

That needs to change soon now. The Cavaliers defense already struggled without rim protection in the paint, and while Varejao’s numbers were not great this season — the team is 5 points per 100 possessions better when he was off the court — he was still by far their best option.

Bulls, Thunder hot on the trail for Pau Gasol

Pau Gasol, Ryan Kelley, Kevin Durant

Pau Gasol might want to get paid $10 million per year, but it’s tough seeing him commanding that high a salary.

Contenders – like the Spurs and Heat – are interested, but they lack the cap space to make big offers. Teams with cap space might not want such an old player.

But Gasol might get his choice among the NBA’s top contenders. In addition to San Antonio and Miami, the Bulls and Thunder are in pursuit.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Ramona Shelburne of ESPN:

The Thunder could offer Gasol the full non-taxpayer mid-level exception ($5,305,000) and remain below the projected luxury-tax line, though any unlikely incentives that are met next season could push them over the line. They’d have less than $500,000 in leeway, though perhaps the actual tax line is set higher than currently projected.

Oklahoma City could also waive Hasheem Thabeet’s fully unguaranteed salary to gain extra wiggle room or replace him with a veteran like Mike Miller.

Amnestying Kendrick Perkins – probably a non-starter anyway – alone would create no extra room for Gasol, though it would put the bi-annual exception – rather than a minimum contract – in play for Miller.

The Bulls brass flying to Los Angeles to meet with Gasol certainly puts their pursuit on another level. Time spent in the air and meeting with Gasol is time Chicago’s executives can’t be meeting with other free agents.

Presently, the Bulls can offer the same amount as the Thunder, but Chicago’s road to greater cap space – amnestying Carlos Boozer and waiving the unguaranteed contracts of Ronnie Brewer,Mike James andLouis Amundson – is much easier to traverse. Those moves would give the Bulls room to offer Gasol a deal starting up to $10,741,949.

That would likely be more than enough salary to lure Gasol, but the Bulls would essentially pay double for that roster spot. After all, they’d still have to pay Boozer, even if he doesn’t count against the cap. I’m not sure Jerry Reinsdorf would accept that just to get Gasol. Possibly, Chicago is armed only with the same non-taxpayer MLE the Thunder have at their disposal.

One advantage the Thunder have is Gasol is the best free agent linked to them thus far. They can devote all their attention to him. The Bulls, on the other hand, have clearly put Carmelo Anthony first.

Days from turning 34, Gasol might take a discount to play for a contender. With Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and Serge Ibaka plus multiple intriguing young role players, the Thunder are definitely among the 2015 title favorites. Upgrading from Perkins to Gasol would make them much more dangerous. Gasol would add interior scoring Oklahoma City lacks, and he defends well enough – especially relative to the slowed Perkins.

If the Thunder sign Gasol, they might even eclipse the Spurs as the 2015 favorites.

Taj Gibson and Carlos Boozer are the pivot points in Bulls’ pursuit of Carmelo Anthony

Chicago Bulls v New York Knicks

Derrick Rose, whose play varies from MVP-caliber to non-existent due to injury, is the Bulls’ most important player and biggest X-factor.

Carmelo Anthony knows this, which is why he wanted to see Rose in action. Assuming Melo is satisfied – if he’s not, likely none of this matters – Taj Gibson and Carlos Boozer become essential to any negotiations between Melo, the Bulls and Knicks.

K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune:

Sources said both the Bulls and Anthony, should he choose Chicago, want to keep Gibson for a core that would significantly improve their chances for an Eastern Conference championship.

Chris Broussard of ESPN:

But the Knicks, according to sources, will not cooperate with any plan that involves them taking back Boozer.

It’s no wonder the Bulls and Melo, if he signs there, want to keep Gibson in Chicago. He’s a very good player – a top-shelf defender and rebounder and, at times, aggressive scorer. He makes his team better.

He also makes $8 million next season, a roadblock to Chicago creating enough cap room to sign Melo.

If they amnesty Boozer, waive the fully unguaranteed contracts of Ronnie Brewer, Mike James andLouis Amundson, renounce all their free agents and trade Mike Dunleavy, Anthony Randolph, Tony Snell and Greg Smith without receiving any salary in return – the Bulls could offer Melo a contract that starts at $16,284,762 and is worth $69,535,934 over four years based on the projected salary cap.

That’s far short of the max salary – $22,458,402 starting, $95,897,375 over four years – Melo could get signing outside New York, and it might be difficult to move some of those contracts (Randolph and maybe even Dunleavy) without offering a sweetener.

The bigger challenge would be convincing Melo to leave more than $26 million on the table – and that’s not even considering how much more the Knicks could offer him.

The Bulls could bump the offer to a max deal by also dealing Gibson without returning salary, but Melo might not want to play in a Gibson-less Chicago. If Melo is going to the Bulls to win now, he knows Gibson is a big part of that.

Chicago could bypass this issue by arranging a sign-and-trade with the Knicks. Of course, that requires convincing New York to agree.

If Phil Jackson wants to take a hardline stance against sign-and-trading Melo, I could understand that. As you can see, the Bulls would have a difficult time keeping their core together while making space for Melo. Another prominent Melo suitor, the Rockets, could strip their roster to just Dwight Howard and James Harden, and they still wouldn’t have enough room below the projected cap to offer Melo his full max starting salary. By refusing to entertain sign-and-trades, Jackson might significantly diminish the odds Melo leaves the Knicks.

But if Jackson is willing to conduct a sign-and-trade, refusing to take Boozer is asinine.

Neither the Knicks nor Bulls need to enter negotiations under any illusions about what Boozer is. He’s a player with negative value whose expiring contract would be used only to make the deal’s finances work.

A simple trade of Boozer and one of Brewer, James or Amundson for Melo would allow Melo to receive his max starting salary. New York would have no obligation to Brewer/James/Amundson beyond the trade and none to Boozer beyond next season. Considering the Knicks don’t project to have cap space until 2015 anyway, Boozer wouldn’t interfere much, if at all.

Of course, New York would never go for that.

Brewer/James/Amundson is a worthless piece, and like I said before, Boozer has negative value. It’s up to the Bulls to tweak the deal to include other positive assets – future draft picks, Nikola Mirotic, Jimmy Butler, Tony Snell, Doug McDermott – that compensate the Knicks for both parting with Melo and accepting Boozer. Armed with all its own first rounders, a Kings’ first rounder if it falls outside the top 10 in the next three years and the right to swap picks with the Cavaliers outside the lottery next season, Chicago has the tools to create a tempting offer.

But to make the finances work – unless they include Gibson, whom Melo wants left on the team – the Bulls need to include Boozer in the trade.

Boozer is nothing more than a contract to make the deal work. Sure, he might give the Knicks a little interior and scoring and rebounding in the final year of his contract, but neither New York nor Chicago needs to value that when determining a fair trade. Boozer is a contract.

He’s also a contract who could be useful in another trade for the Bulls sometime before the trade deadline for the same reason he’s useful here. Expiring contracts grease the wheels of larger deals.

Why is Phil Jackson so opposed to this? Maybe he understands the situation and is just posturing. If so, it’s a little annoying, because it’s not necessary. The Bulls, who might just amnesty Boozer, understand his value.

If there’s more to this, and Jackson thinks Boozer’s mere presence would harm the Knicks, he could always tell Boozer not to report. That would still allow New York to trade Boozer later without risking him infecting the team with whatever Jackson believes Boozer carries. (That Boozer has fit in Chicago’s strong organizational culture suggests these fears are unwarranted.)

If Jackson is willing to discuss a sign-and-trade, he should listen to offers that include Boozer. The Bulls will surely add valuable assets in exchange.

But if Jackson flatly refuses and Melo still wants to sign in Chicago, he faces a dilemma – playing with with Gibson or making $26 million extra dollars over the next four years.


Report: Louis Amundson gets invited to Clippers training camp

Lou Amundson

The Los Angeles Clippers are thin along the front line. Sure they start with the incredibly athletic pairing of Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan, but when they go to the bench (or when Jordan has to sit the fourth quarter) it is Ryan Hollins and Byron Mullens. And that’s it.

Now Louis Amundson will try to work his way into that group.

Amundson has gotten an invite to Clippers training camp, reports Marc Stein of ESPN. The Clippers had been rumored to have had interest in him for a while but this is a non-guaranteed contract.

Amundson played 39 games with three teams last season and brings a team energy off the bench, some rebounding, and almost no offense whatsoever. He’s not going to provide a team much at this point, but it may be enough to make the Clippers roster. Maybe. But it’s still a long shot.