Tag: Lou Amundson

Washington Wizards v Charlotte Hornets

Report: Knicks reach deal with backup center Kevin Seraphin


The New York Knicks are loaded with big men.

Robin Lopez will start at center, with Kyle O’Quinn behind on him. Kristaps Porzingis probably starts at the four, and there are Derrick Williams and Lou Amundson behind him.

Now add Kevin Seraphin to the mix, reports Michael Scotto of Sheridan Hoops.

This is a solid deal for the Knicks, Seraphin is a good backup center and they got him at a fair price, he can battle O’Quinn for minutes.

Seraphin had spent his entire five-season NBA career as a reserve with the Washington Wizards. He had hoped to find a place to be a starter, but that market was not out there. Playing on a one-year deal gives him a chance to prove he deserves that next summer, and he will be in line to try and cash in when the television money floods the system.

But Seraphin needs to prove he deserves that starting role and money. The French center has yet to do so.

He’s an undersized center at 6’9″ who played 15 minutes a night last season, scored 6.6 points on 51.3 percent shooting, grabbed 3.3 boards and was solid but unspectacular. He improved last season addressing weaknesses such as not fouling, plus his passing looked better. That said he has no shooting range — nearly 50 percent of his shots come within eight feet of the rim, and while he can step out a little along the baselines he’s not exactly a floor spacer.

Because of that shooting range he’s a center only, and Lopez is the main man there. But Seraphin will be solid and get the chance to prove he is more than that.

Lou Amundson considering offer from overseas

Louis Amundson

Lou Amundson is a blue-collar, hard working player who doesn’t have any exceptional skills but can fill in down low in a pinch, do his job, and always give consistent effort, which is harder to find in the NBA than you’d think. He’s a free agent and hasn’t gotten the deal he’s looking for yet. As a result, Sam Amick of SI.com says that he’s considering, but not leaning towards, an offer from overseas:

Forward Lou Amundson – he of the high-energy, doing-the-dirty-work six-year career – continues to weigh his NBA options but is also talking to teams overseas. The Greek team Panathinaikos of the Euroleague is among said teams, source says. Amundson, who played a reserve role in Indiana last season, is confident he’ll find a good spot in the league but is looking at everything.

via Sam Amick’s post on NBA Free Agency | Latest updates on Sulia.

If he wanted the most money he could probably get a European team to pay through the roof for him eventually. But he can also have a much easier time of it just by being patient. Training camp will start, and, regrettably, someone will get injured. That team will be desperate for bodies, and Amundson will be available. It won’t take much for him to be in a position to contribute to a team, it just takes time.

But losing Amundson overseas would totally be a bummer, man.

Report: Warriors to trade Lou Amundson to Pacers for Brandon Rush

Minnesota Timberwolves v Golden State Warriors

From Marcus Thompson of the Contra Costa Times:

UPDATE II: The Warriors are in the process of trading Lou Amundson, according to a team source. A second source confirmed it is for Indiana Pacers swingman Brandon Rush. Amundson was held out of Saturday’s game vs. Sacramento. It is not official and likely won’t be before Sunday. I’m told its a straight-up trade.

via Warriors Definitely Trading Amundson for Brandon Rush – Inside the Warriors – with Marcus Thompson.

It’s a value pick-up for the Pacers. Amundson is a serviceable back-up big who can do the kind of dirty work that the Pacers need him to do.  He’s not going to over-extend himself, he’s a pro with experience, and he’ll help with hustle plays. The fact that they got him for Brandon Rush is pretty phenomenal, considering Rush’s stock has been in a downward spiral for two years.

For the Warriors… I mean, Rush could be a phenomenal two-guard with the right coaching. And he gives them a bigger back-up two behind Monta Ellis (size is going to be a problem for this team’s backcourt). It’s just weird to surrender a guy who does the things that Mark Jackson always talks about for a shooter who shot 42 percent from the field (though he did shoot 41 percent from the arc).

But for the Warriors, with Kwame Brown, they’re clearly going for size. Jeremy Tyler showed some things in the Warriors’ preseason debut, and David Lee and Ekpe Udoh will get long minutes. Oh, and Andris Biedrins didn’t get amnestied. Rush may have trouble getting minutes, though, since Klay Thompson showed a ton of promise Saturday night.

Warriors’ Amundson healthy, will be ready for season

Minnesota Timberwolves v Golden State Warriors
1 Comment

Lou Amundson is not a game changer inside, but he is the kind of guy every team could use — an effort guy who can rebound and defend. Well, he can be that when he’s healthy, but the Warriors brought him in last season and he played only 46 games and averaged just 15 minutes in those.

He had a finger injury and missed more than a month to start the season, he had back spasms around the All-Star Break. Through that, he never really gained the trust of new coach Keith Smart.

Now, Amundson tells Matt Steinmetz of CSNBayArea.com he is ready to go next season.

“In retrospect, how I feel now with how I felt then. I wanted to feel like I was a 100 percent but knowing how I feel, I definitely wasn’t,” Amundson said after a workout with teammates. “That’s difficult when you want to play and play at a high level and your body just won’t let you. With the finger and the back, it was a tough season. Obviously I want to stay healthy this year….

“(The lockout is) unfortunate, everybody wants to play,” Amundson said. “In my case, coming off a year I didn’t perform like I wanted, and I was injured a lot of the season, I really feel like I have unfinished business.” I want to get out there and show everybody up there in the Bay what I can do. I’m excited to start playing, whenever that may be.”

The Warriors are not exactly impressive across the front line and new coach Mark Jackson is going to need more out of David Lee, something out of Andris Biedrins, and he’s going to need Amundson to be an impact energy guy off the bench again. Like he was in Phoenix. At least this year it seems like his body may let him.

NBA Season Preview: Phoenix Suns


Last season: 54-28, as they returned to the style that the roster was built for — seven seconds or less. Well, really, it was more like 12 seconds or less as they utilized a lot of secondary options in the transition and drag screens, but the philosophy was the same. The rode that style to the best offense in the league last year, and rode that (and the bench) all the way to the Western Conference finals. A good season.

Head Coach: Alvin Gentry, who showed a lot of veteran coach savvy last year. He understood that the team needed to run against with this roster, so they did. He understood that he had a bench that could be special and he used them well, built them into a unit that won a few playoff games themselves.

Key Departures: Amar’e Stoudemire, half of the best pick-and-roll duo in the game, was not offered a five-year, fully guaranteed contract by the Suns. This may be what you will see under the new CBA — on long-term deals, after three year teams will have an opt-out or inexpensive buyout of a player — but it is not part of the current deal. New York came in with the full five guaranteed and now Stoudemire is going to save basketball in New York.

Leandro Barbosa went out in the Turkoglu deal, but that was not big loss with Nash as the starting point and Goran Dragic is the clear number two. Lou Amundson was allowed to leave and they will miss him, not a lot of energy/rebound/dirty work guys like that around.

Also gone is Steve Kerr, who came in a few years back and tried to convert this roster into a Spurs-style team (trading Shawn Marion for Shaquille O’Neal among other moves), which backfired. Miserably. But to Kerr’s credit he recognized his mistakes and changed course, rebuilt the team again in a running mold. Not a lot of GMs are willing to admit they were wrong and make changes like that.

Key Additions: Hedo Turkoglu comes in but it seems an expensive and odd fit. He theoretically can take some of the load off of Steve Nash because he is a good pick and roll ball handler. He was in Orlando during their run to the finals two seasons ago, but last year in Toronto as the pick-and-roll ball handler he shot just 36.1 percent and the team scored just 0.77 points per possession, and he turned the ball over 18.8 percent of the time. You do not really want to take the ball out of Nash’s hands for that. If he can return to form and remain a good spot up shooter, he can have value. But the drop off as a number two man from Stoudemire to Turkoglu is dramatic.

One of my favorite pickups this summer was the Suns getting Josh Childress back from Greece, at a reasonable five years, $34 million. He’s been overseas for two years and I think a lot of people forgot just how good he is (he was in the running for sixth man of the year before he left). The only question now is now many small forwards the Suns can have on the roster — Grant Hill, Turkoglu, Childress and Jared Dudley.

Hakim Warrick was brought in at an inflated four years, $17 million, but he is athletic and shout fit well with the system. Gani Lawal was drafted.

Former agent Lon Babby is now your head of basketball operations, with Cleveland assistant GM Lance Banks given the head job. However, most of the roster moves were made before these guys came on board (although Turkoglu and Childress were Babby clients, so…). Their fingerprints are not really on this team yet.

Best case scenario: A return to the Western Conference finals and another shot at the Lakers.

For that to happen: The more diversified offense is going to have to work, Turkoglu has to step up, age cannot catch up with this team and somebody has to play a little defense and rebound.

The Suns are now without the unstoppable force that was the Nash/Stoudemire pick and roll. Now you’re going to get a lot more Robin Lopez setting the pick — which he did well with in a limited role last season.

Around them will be the one thing the Suns have in abundance — guys who can shoot the rock. Everyone on this roster can score, and that diversity of attack is what the Suns will count on now that they can’t just fall back on Nash and Stoudemire. They will to a degree (although how late-game situations play out will be interesting). This team is going to put points up because everyone out there can knock it down and there will be open looks in transition. And even at 37, you can expect Nash will still get them the rock. Plus Goran Dragic has become Nash in Waiting with his stepped up play.

At some point, age is going to catch up with Steve Nash and Grant Hill, but for now they remain on the Ponce De Leon plan. Expect good seasons out of them.

The question will be how well with the Suns defend — they were 19th in the league last season in defensive efficiency and they added guys like Turkoglu who is not a great defender and will get major minutes. Stoudemire and Amundson were also their best rebounders, so the Suns will be vulnerable on the boards. And really good running teams start it with defense and rebounding. As a team, the Suns need to find a way to defend and board or every game will be a shootout.

More likely the Suns will: Be entertaining but not as good, and struggle to make the playoffs. Simply put, talent wins games and the Suns lot some with the Stoudemire departure.

Last season the Suns offense was good enough to overcome the defense, and the bench could win them games. This season, the defense and rebounding will likely be a bigger anchor on a good, but not quite as good, offense. Turkoglu will be spotty. Hill and Nash will need a couple nights off.

So long as Steve Nash is on the team the Suns will be entertaining and dangerous. But to get back to where they need to be just too many things have to go perfect again, and that’s hard to expect.

Prediction: 44-38, fighting for (and maybe missing out on) one of the last playoff spots in the West.