Tag: Los Angeles Clippers

Adam Silver

Adam Silver says he’s ‘on the fence’ about whether to change rules that allow intentional fouling strategy


Fouling poor free throw shooters away from the ball grinds the game to a halt, and isn’t at all aesthetically pleasing.

But it’s legal under the rules, so it has continued to be a topic of debate, even at this early stage of the postseason.

Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich used it extensively in a Game 2 victory over the Clippers, sending DeAndre Jordan — a 39.7 percent free throw shooter during the regular season — to the line 12 times in the fourth quarter alone.

Celtics head coach Brad Stevens employed it against Tristan Thompson — a 64 percent free throw shooter — during the first quarter of Game 3 versus the Cavaliers.

You can question whether or not the so-called “Hack-a-Shaq” strategy is effective, but as long as there are dreadfully poor free throw shooters on the floor, there will be a segment of head coaches who choose to play the percentages. There’s been plenty of talk about whether the league should put rules into place to prevent this from happening, but NBA commissioner Adam Silver remains undecided on how to handle the issue.

From Brian Mahoney of the Associated Press:

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said Thursday he is “on the fence” about intentional fouling away from the ball and expects the league to be “very engaged” about the tactic over the coming months. …

“I’ve sat in meetings with some of the greatest players like Michael Jordan, Larry Bird who said that players should learn to make their free throws and it’s part of the game. At the same time, it doesn’t make for great television, so I’m on the fence right now.”

Silver said he finds it to be a “fascinating” strategy in some cases.

“But in other games I watch it and I think, ‘Oh my god, I feel people changing the channels,”‘ he said. “So we’re also an entertainment property that’s competing against a lot of other options that people have for their discretionary time.”

The easiest way to put an end to this, of course, would be to give teams one free throw and possession of the ball anytime an intentional foul away from the ball took place. But that’s assuming that the league does want to end it, which right now seems to be up for some debate — at least in the eyes of the commissioner.

PBT Extra: Thin bench becomes big issue for Clippers against Spurs

San Antonio Spurs v Los Angeles Clippers - Game Two

Blake Griffin has come under more criticism following a triple double than maybe any player in NBA playoff history. (LeBron James against the Mavericks back in 2011 is on the ridiculous list, too.) The Clippers are not close in Game 2 without a huge night from Griffin, but his turnover late in regulation with Los Angeles up two allowed San Antonio to tie the game and force overtime, where the Spurs eventually won.

The amazing Jenna Corrado asks me if the criticism is fair. Welcome to the playoffs. Fair is irrelevant. But I think this points to how the Clippers lack of depth left them making mistakes late — Chris Paul, Griffin, and the rest were exhausted. You could see it — the Clippers play an aggressive defense, play an uptempo game, and their starters carry a heavy load of minutes because Doc Rivers can’t trust his bench. When you’re tired, you’re more likely to make mental and physical mistakes. Like late turnovers, or not getting back on Patty Mills leak out, or Matt Barnes getting burned on Kawhi Leonard’s fake zipper cut and move to the basket. All of that happened late.

This series is incredibly close. The injury to Tony Parker is part of what will determine the outcome. But so too will the fact Doc has to lean so heavily on his starters.

Kawhi Leonard wins Defensive Player of the Year despite more first-place votes for Draymond Green

San Antonio Spurs v Golden State Warriors

Kawhi Leonard didn’t need long to make an impression.

Leonard returned from an extended injury-caused absence in mid-January, and he terrorized opponents. For the last half of the season, Leonard looked like the NBA’s best defender – hounding top perimeter scorers, switching inside, playing passing lanes and getting key rebounds.

That swayed voters to give him Defensive Player of the Year over presumptive favorite Draymond Green, whose versatility helped the Warriors play the league’s best defense.

I would have rewarded Green’s overall impact – and voters game him more first-place votes than they did Leonard – over Leonard’s better defense in fewer minutes. But this is hardly a bad call. Leonard played awesome, and to enough voters, he played enough.

Doc Rivers’ lobbying paid off with DeAndre Jordan finishing a higher-than-he-deserves third.

Here’s the full voting with player, team (first-place votes, second-place votes, third-place votes, points):

1. Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio (37-41-25-333)

2. Draymond Green, Golden State (45-25-17-317)

3. DeAndre Jordan, L.A. Clippers (32-25-26-261)

4. Anthony Davis, New Orleans (11-15-7-107)

5. Rudy Gobert, Utah (2-4-11-33)

6. Andrew Bogut, Golden (0-6-13-31)

7. Tony Allen, Memphis (1-4-12-29)

8. Tim Duncan, San Antonio (1-1-4-12)

9. Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Charlotte (0-2-3-9)

10. Jimmy Butler, Chicago (0-2-1-7)

10. Marc Gasol, Memphis (0-2-1-7)

12. Joakim Noah, Chicago (0-1-1-4)

13. LeBron James, Cleveland (0-0-3-3)

13. Trevor Ariza, Houston (0-1-0-3)

15. Patrick Beverley, Houston (0-0-1-1)

15. DeMarre Carroll, Atlanta (0-0-1-1)

15. Nerlens Noel, Philadelphia (0-0-1-1)

15. Chris Paul, L.A. Clippers (0-0-1-1)

15. Hassan Whiteside, Miami (0-0-1-1)

Too much Tim Duncan, too much classic Spurs when it matters evens series with Clippers 1-1


LOS ANGELES — It has been like this for nearly two decades now: The Spurs needed something and Tim Duncan was there to give it to them.

They needed better shooting than Game 1, they needed points, and he had 28 points on 23 shots. Duncan was going right at DeAndre Jordan early, he hit a key shot in the paint in overtime, he had 11 rebounds. In a game the Spurs said they were desperate to win, they turned to Tim Duncan early and often.

“He was probably our best player in Game 1, too,” Gregg Popovich said after the game. “This is nothing new for Timmy… He was spectacular. He continues to amaze me with the things that he is able to do.”

The Spurs needed all of it on a night where Blake Griffin dropped a triple-double — 29 points, 12 points, 11 assists. Game 2 was a game the Clippers thought they had — to the point that Chris Paul stomped up and down in frustration at one point in overtime. It was the Clippers stars who seemed worn down and made mistakes late — it was a Griffin turnover that led to the free throws that allowed the Spurs to force overtime.

Then in the OT it was vintage Spurs: Duncan hits a leaner in the paint, Patty Mills scores on a leak out when the Clippers fall asleep, then Kawhi Leonard got a layup after Matt Barnes loses him. The Spurs executed the way they always do. The Clippers would not die in front of another raucous home crowd, but a J.J. Redick three rimmed out, and the Spurs hung on to win 111-107 in overtime. It was certainly not always pretty, but it was entertaining in what has been the best first round series of the playoffs so far.

The series is now tied 1-1 heading back to San Antonio for Game 3 Friday night.

Thanks to Duncan.

And Patty Mills.

Tony Parker left the game midway through the fourth quarter and did not return due to what was described as a tight right Achilles (there are no other details yet). Mills stepped up — he drove and was fouled, then hit the two free throws that forced OT. Then the Austrailian had six points to lead the Spurs in OT, and 18 total on the night off the bench.

“That was a game of grit, and grind, and competitiveness,” Mills said. “We showed competitiveness at the toughest times, which is good. We lacked that in the first game so we knew that before any Xs and Os in this game we needed to show we could come out and compete for 48 minutes — and even more so tonight.”

It was clear from the opening tip the Spurs were playing with a little more desperation. The Spurs came out much sharper and more focused defensively. They doubled the pick-and-roll out high, they rotated more sharply, and they got back in transition defense. Offensively they went to Duncan inside, and he hit 8-of-9 for 16 first half points. The Spurs moved the ball much better and that led to better looks, for the game 46 percent of their shots were uncontested. Still, the Spurs missed their threes (3-of-12 in the first half). The Clippers were no better from three (2-of-9 in the first half) but got 19 points on 13 shots from Griffin in the first half, he was hitting from everywhere. Chris Paul was sharp as usual, but the Spurs led 52-47 at the half.

Clippers came out in the second half with better ball movement, better defense, but they missed shots early. Spurs offense was not clicking either; Parker has not been sharp (or fully healthy) and it was just a lot of Duncan and Leonard vs. Paul and Griffin.

At times the Clippers started to look tired — they lack depth, and this was a hard-fought, up-tempo game. Yet they would not quit and they had their chances late. Jordan blocked a Duncan shot in the lane, Matt Barnes had a key late steal. It seemed like the Clippers would win.

The Spurs were the Spurs. They executed relentlessly. And while the polished veterans tried to sell this as just another win, the looks in their eyes and their comments in the locker room postgame when the cameras and recorders were not on let you know they thought this win was a massive one.

“The mindset was like a Game 7,” Mills said. “That’s the way we treated it. Like I said the competitiveness of that game that really got us the win in the end.”

Chris Paul, Luol Deng to appear in NBA’s first exhibition game in Africa on Aug. 1

NBA Cares All-Star Day of Service "LEARN" with City Year
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As the NBA continues its push to grow the game on a global scale, the league announced that it will hold its first-ever exhibition game in Africa this summer.

“The NBA has worked hard to grow the game of basketball in Africa, and I am excited to take this next step of playing our first game on the continent,” said NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, via official release.  “Our players have been tremendous partners in this effort, and all of us look forward to sharing the authentic NBA experience and the values of our game with fans in Africa.”

Chris Paul and Luol Deng will serve as team captains, in what will be a Team World vs. Team Africa game format. The contest will take place Aug. 1 at Ellis Park Arena in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Others scheduled to participate include  2014-15 NBA Coach of the Year Mike Budenholzer of the Atlanta Hawks, Brooklyn Nets head coach Lionel Hollins, Nets General Manager Billy King, NBA Global Ambassador Dikembe Mutombo, NBA Africa Ambassador Hakeem Olajuwon, San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, Boston Celtics head coach Brad Stevens, Toronto Raptors General Manager Masai Ujiri and New Orleans Pelicans head coach Monty Williams.