Tag: Los Angeles Clippers

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Clippers’ coach Doc Rivers fined $25,000 for criticizing officials after Game 5

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“I don’t complain much…” the second those words left Doc Rivers’ mouth after Game 5, there was not so much outright laughter as eye rolls throughout the NBA. No team complains to and about officiating as much as the Clippers.

But as he continued everyone knew this was going to cost him cash.

“I thought we got some really tough calls tonight,” Rivers said. “Some brutal calls. The travel on Blake (Griffin), the goaltend on Matt (Barnes), which wasn’t a goaltend. You think about the playoffs, and they’re single-possession games. Those possessions those were crucial. J.J. (Redick’s) foul that got him (fouled) out, J.J. didn’t touch anyone. It’s not why we lost, but those were big plays for us.”

Those comments cost Rivers a $25,000 fine, something the league announced.

He’s not wrong about some of those calls. Barnes’ offensive interference was a poor call, as was the Griffin travel. To be fair, the officials had some questionable calls both ways (particularly early in the game some interesting decisions went against the Spurs), but late in the game the Clippers seemed to get the worse of it.

That said, the officials are never the sole reason a team loses a game. The Clippers were 1-of-14 from three, Blake Griffin was 1-of-9 in the fourth, DeAndre Jordan had an offensive interference call that likely cost the Clippers a key basket with seven seconds left (and that was a good call, Jordan admitted touching the ball).

One other thing: The Spurs handle the ups and downs of the calls and the game much more smoothly than the Clippers. They spend a lot of energy complaining.

Report: DeAndre Jordan ‘has made it clear through back channels’ he’d be interested in joining Mavericks

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DeAndre Jordan has spent the entirety of his seven-year career with the Clippers, and while he may not be the Defensive Player of the Year candidate Doc Rivers has made him out to be, he had a breakout season that will have plenty of teams interested when he becomes an unrestricted free agent at the conclusion of this season.

Jordan led the league in rebounding with an average of 15 per game finished at the top of the leaderboard in field goal percentage with an absurd 71 percent, and finished fourth in blocked shots with an average of 2.23 per contest.

He’s a max contract-level player under the circumstances, but especially so considering the spike we’ll see in the salary cap in advance of the 2016-17 season.

The Clippers will certainly come calling with a five-year deal that only they can offer. But Jordan has already stated his desire to look around a bit, and if the latest report is to be believed, the Dallas Mavericks may be a very real option.

From Tim MacMahon of ESPN Dallas:

Another potential prize summer target for the Mavs: Clippers center DeAndre Jordan, who multiple sources say has made it clear through back channels that he will be extremely interested in coming to Dallas. Signing the 26-year-old Jordan, a dominant physical force who led the league in rebounding and field-goal percentage this season, would mean letting the 32-year-old Tyson Chandler leave again after another one-season stint with the Mavs.

“That’s up to management and what they decide to do,” Chandler said of his possible future in Dallas as he enters free agency, adding that his preference would be to return to the Mavs.

Jordan is a fantastic two-way player, and his athleticism creates problems for teams on both ends of the floor. He’ll be able to dictate the terms of his next contract, but there’s a legitimate decision to be made.

If he’s interested in earning the most guaranteed money possible at this moment, then signing the full five-year max that the Clippers can offer is the way to go. Or, if he’d rather sign a shorter deal to later take advantage of the rising salary cap and ultimately earn more in the future, that could open up any team as a possibility — and that obviously includes the Mavericks.

WATCH: Chris Paul called for questionable technical foul late in Clippers’ Game 5 loss to Spurs

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Following a tough Game 5 loss to the Spurs on Tuesday, Clippers head coach Doc Rivers lamented the amount of calls from the officials that he believed were incorrect, and went against his team.

“I don’t complain much,” Doc Rivers said. “I thought we got some really tough calls tonight. Some brutal calls. The travel on Blake (Griffin), the goaltend on Matt (Barnes), which wasn’t a goaltend. You think about the playoffs, and they’re single-possession games. Those possessions those were crucial. J.J. (Redick’s) foul that got him (fouled) out, J.J. didn’t touch anyone.

“It’s not why we lost, but those were big plays for us.”

And he didn’t even mention this one — a technical foul on Chris Paul for making a crisp pass to the official following a Spurs made basket.

“I thought if anything, (the technical foul) was a delay of game,” Paul said after the game. “In the other 82 games, it would have been a delay of game but they didn’t call it.”

Touching the ball after a made basket — even just to get it quickly to the nearest official — is indeed usually a delay of game warning in most situations.

Unless, of course, Paul said something inflammatory as he whipped the pass.

But whether he did or he didn’t, it was just one of many crazy plays that helped decide a critical Game 5, in what might be the best series we get throughout the entirety of the postseason.

Tim Duncan rejects Blake Griffin in final minute of Spurs’ Game 5 win over Clippers (VIDEO)

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The Spurs came away with a critical Game 5 win over the Clippers on Tuesday, and in a contest that came down to the final few possessions in order to be decided, Tim Duncan made one of the game’s most important defensive stops.

Blake Griffin received the pass from Chris Paul in the lane, and with Duncan guarding DeAndre Jordan, who was positioned on the baseline near the basket, Griffin believed he’d be able to elevate and get the shot up, somewhat uncontested.

Duncan, however, met Griffin at the top of his shot to come away with the clean block, and managed to keep Jordan at bay with his off hand at the very same time.

Boris Diaw grabbed the steal once the ball was back in Griffin’s hands closer to the floor, and the Spurs were off and running in the other direction.

Clippers frustrated with officials, themselves, must find way to regroup in 48 hours

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LOS ANGELES — To a man, the Clippers tried not to blame the officials for their Game 5 loss… but you could tell they wanted to.

“I don’t complain much,” Doc Rivers said, in the quintessential line that tells you complaints are coming. “I thought we got some really tough calls tonight. Some brutal calls. The travel on Blake (Griffin), the goaltend on Matt (Barnes), which wasn’t a goaltend. You think about the playoffs, and they’re single-possession games. Those possessions those were crucial. J.J. (Redick’s) foul that got him (fouled) out, J.J. didn’t touch anyone.

“It’s not why we lost, but those were big plays for us.”

The referees are never the sole reason a team loses, that includes the Clippers on Tuesday night. In this case, the Clippers were 1-of-14 from three, and DeAndre Jordan tipped in a ball over the cylinder that could have had Los Angeles up  with seven seconds to go. (After the game Jordan admitted touching the ball.) There were other plays they missed.

But the Clippers felt the calls in the fourth quarter didn’t go their way and robbed them of some opportunities. They were very frustrated as a team. And they have a point, plenty of calls didn’t go their way that should have — Jamal Crawford got called for bodying Tony Parker on the baseline when Parker hooked his arm around Crawford and pulled him into his body. Rivers was right about the Matt Barnes goaltend, and the Blake Griffin travels being poor calls.

Then there was the technical on Chris Paul, which confused Rivers and the Clippers players — and ended up being costly late.

“I thought if anything, (the technical foul) was a delay of game,” Paul said after the game. “In the other 82 games, it would have been a delay of fame but they didn’t call it.”

While the calls didn’t go their way, the Clippers got frustrated and at moments flustered in a way the Spurs simply don’t when they don’t get the breaks.

“We have to give credit to the Spurs. We’ve got to play through our mistakes,” Paul said.

“I’ll be frustrated all night…” Rivers said. “There’s nothing wrong with frustration. I have no problem with guys being frustrated, you have 48 hours or whatever to get over it, and we will.”

They need to get over it by tip off Thursday night — they can’t afford to have a hangover from this game, fall behind in San Antonio and play catch-up. The Spurs don’t want to make another flight back to Los Angeles, they want to close the game out so Saturday nights they can go to watch Mayweather vs. Pacquiao parties on Saturday. You can be sure the Spurs will bring it.

Can the Clippers?

“Yeah, it’s a gettable game,” Blake Griffin said. “It’s not going to be easy by any means, this is what they do. They’re a great team, a well-coached team, and they’ve been in this situation before. But we’ve also been in tough situations. We’ve also played in some tough games, some games on the road that we needed to win, and we did.

“I expect us to be ready.”