Tag: Lockout

Washington Wizards v Cleveland Cavaliers

Josh Howard interested in joining the Celtics

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The lack of a free agency period to date has all but eradicated the NBA’s rumor mill. Teams have undoubtedly discussed some of their potential targets in private, but with no structure set to actually enable player acquisition, those discussions lack grounding. Those general managers, owners, and coaches are floating ideas, ones that up to this point have yet to escape via unnamed sources.

So now, we turn to the other side of the coin. With NBA teams unwilling to talk about — or even leak anything about — any player in particular, all we’re left with are potential free agents and their personal preferences. Such players know little to nothing about which teams might be interested in them and what they’d be willing to offer, but some players have been willing to discuss their preferred landing spots on a conceptual level.

Josh Howard isn’t exactly a top-tier free agent, but he’s nonetheless a useful player who will be courted by a handful of teams. A report from The Boston Globe hinted that Howard could be on the Celtics’ wish list, a pairing that could certainly be beneficial for both parties. Howard could use a successful platform to give his career a jump start, and Boston — even after acquiring Jeff Green mid-season — could still use a bit of help in filling out their wing rotation on the cheap. Howard isn’t likely to demand a very substantial contract, and could pan out as a nice, short-term value signing for a team like the Celtics.

And, wouldn’t you know it: Howard sees the same potential value in the pairing. From Gary Washburn of the Boston Globe (via Celtics Town):

Josh Howard has spent the past 18 months recovering from a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee, spending most of last season on the sideline before playing in 18 games with the Wizards. A free agent at age 31, Howard said he is just now reaching 100 percent health, but the lockout – and the lack of a summer league – has prevented him from showcasing his game.

In last weekend’s Chris Paul-organized all-star game in Winston-Salem, N.C., Howard participated in his first organized action of the summer, expressing full confidence that his knee is healed. During his prime, Howard was an effective swingman who averaged 18 or more points for three consecutive seasons (2006-09) and was an effective defender.

…The Celtics, meanwhile, have only seven signed players and may be seeking established veterans of Howard’s ilk. “Boston is a great organization,’’ he said. “I also have a good friend in Marquis Daniels that spent a lot of time up there and who spoke highly of the organization. So that would be one of the teams I would actually look at if I had the opportunity to go there.’’

These aren’t the kinds of comments that players just volunteer on their own; Washburn was following up on the initial note from his previous report, and appears to have clearly and directly asked Howard about his own interest in the organization. His response is noncommittal, but vaguely positive.

That’s about all one could ask of Howard at this point in the game, and this is about as close as we’ll get to a true free agent rumor until the lockout finally ends. Unnamed sources around the league are on a gag order and risk being heavily fined if they start tossing out player names, so we’re limited to thoughts and one-sided responses. I never thought I’d miss the spitballing of the rumor mill, but trade buzz and free agent rumors have become an integrated part of the NBA experience. Even if they offer little more than a glimpse into an alternate reality, they fuel the NBA and its sense of infinite possibility.

Players meet Saturday night, the line holds at 53 percent for BRI

Derek Fisher, Billy Hunter

The NBPA was supposed to hold a regional meeting on Sunday and Monday, but late Saturday, word came from Yahoo! Sports that the Sunday meeting was canceled? Hope for a last-minute negotiating session? No, silly rabbit. Negotiating is for grown-ups! This is a finger-pointing contest now. Or another type of contest I won’t define. So what happened?

From Yahoo! Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski:

Via union source: Meeting was scheduled for Sunday but players in Miami for FIU game requested it be held on Saturday night. So they had it.Sun Oct 09 04:14:05 via web

In Miami meeting on Saturday night, union source says players were united on holding firm at 53 percent of BRI. Owners want 50-50 split.Sun Oct 09 04:29:27 via web

Just to read in between the lines, there, the superstars in Miami for the charity game wanted to change the schedule for the entire membership, so they did.

SI’s got a little different version of the same, but the reality is still this. The NBA intends to cancel games. The players will not buckle to avoid games being canceled. We’ve hit as far as they’re willing to go at this point and it’s time for the real pain to set in. Just like Melo said after the exhibition in Miami Saturday night:

“Theyre going to cancel the first two weeks of the season,” Anthony said. “Well see what happens then. If they want to lock us out, lock us out. Were going to stick together.”

via After charity game, NBA players discuss lockout – NBA – SI.com.

The trenches have been dug. Barring a miracle, the 2011-2012 NBA season will not be 82 games.

Brandon Jennings is playing a lot of pickup basketball

Brandon Jennings
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Over the lockout, there have been a lot of very good stories about what NBA players are doing to keep busy while they wait for news on when the season is going to start. Here’s the latest one of those stories, a lengthy and interesting profile of LA native Brandon Jennings’ Summer basketball regimen by SI’s Lee Jenkins. Jennings has been playing basketball wherever and whenever he can this summer, and is regaining some of his street-ball legend status in the process:

Jennings has become the union’s underground ambassador, appearing in more pickup games than Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson. “Where they hooping?” he tweets in the morning, with a hashtag for his location. He considers all offers, and if he chooses one, he tweets the address in case anybody wants to stop by…

…The score was kept on a hand-operated flip board. Kids shot at the open basket when action shifted to the opposite end. Players kicked the ball when they got mad and peeled off their shirts when they got hot. AIS won the first two games easily, with Jennings at three-quarters speed, but was tied at 10 in game three. “F—!” Jennings yelled, before heaving a full-court pass for a layup, drilling a 35-foot step-back jumper, then pulling up for a 40-foot clincher. “Next,” he said. After one more game, not as close, he hopped back on his low rider and pedaled into the darkness, past the softball players warming up for their beer league, all the way to his aunt Marsha’s house for dinner.

Jennings had a rough sophomore season. His three-point percentage went way down last season, he had fewer assists per game than he did his rookie year, and he didn’t improve his sub-par scoring efficiency very much while being the point guard for the NBA’ s worst offensive team. Maybe a summer full of 40-foot bombs, playground scoring explosions, and off-the-head passes will boost Jennings’ confidence going into next season, and help him become a true NBA lead guard after suffering a bit of a set-back last season.

What the Hornets should do if the lockout ends

Chris Paul, Kobe Bryant

It’s a crucial year for the Hornets. Chris Paul can opt out of his contract with New Orleans after this season, and it goes without saying that the franchise would be devastated if Paul left the team. Here are a few ways that the Hornets can build on their spirited first-round performance against the Lakers last season:

– Get Healthy:

After battling injuries for the better part of two regular seasons and seeing his PER drop from 30 in 08-09 to 23.75 in 09-10 and 10-11, Chris Paul used the first round of the playoffs to show everybody that when CP3 is on his game, he’s as good as anybody in the league. Paul is almost unquestionably the league’s best ballhandler and one of its best passers, and he’s turned himself into one of the league’s best outside shooters as well.

If his knees can stay healthy for a full season, he could give the Hornets a fighting chance at getting into the playoffs and winning a series or two all by himself. He’s that good.

David West is CP3’s sidekick on the court, but a torn ACL suffered late in the year kept him out of the playoffs and could cause him to miss a significant portion of this season. If Paul and West both have healthy knees coming into the playoffs, the Hornets could make some noise. If they don’t, it’s hard to envision them as serious contenders.

– Get Players:

It’s not a state secret that the Hornets’ roster is incredibly thin. Outside of Paul, Jarrett Jack, Emeka Okafor, West, and Trevor Ariza, the Hornets don’t have much, and the team desperately needs to stock the roster with some quality role players and veterans (in other words, not Marco Belinelli), who can knock down the open shots that Paul creates and play some defense.

– Stay Defensive:

The secret of the Hornets’ return to the playoffs was their improved defense. Under Monty Williams, the Hornets were a top-10 team in defensive efficiency last season. If the Hornets can maintain their commitment to defense and become the best defensive team in the Western conference (only the Lakers and Mavericks had a higher defensive efficiency in the West than the Hornets did last season), and simply let a healthy CP3 do his thing on offense, they could end up being a very tough out in the playoffs.

Shaq points to Joe Johnson to explain owners’ mistakes

Chicago Bulls v Atlanta Hawks - Game Six

Shaquille O’Neal pulled out the bad contract = lockout card again, but rather than going with the classics — Eddy Curry or Rashard Lewis — he went with the new and threw Atlanta’s Joe Johnson under the bus.

Which is both right and wrong at the same time. But we’ll get to that farther down the page.

First, here is what Shaq told the Times-Picayune when talking about the lockout (and notice how he still refers to the players as “we”):

O’Neal said a number of owners have overspent to keep players on rosters despite incurring significant revenue losses. O’Neal points to the Atlanta Hawks’ decision to re-sign guard Joe Johnson to a six-year, $119 million contract in July 2010 as a prime example of a franchise overpaying for a player when they not bringing in significant revenue to offset the costs.

“I love Joe Johnson and I hope he doesn’t get mad with me, but he’s not a $20 million a year guy,” O’Neal said. “Business-wise, Atlanta isn’t making that much money. But if you are going to offer a kid a lot of money, he’s going to take it. I think we need a system that protect the owners from each other.’’

First the disclaimer, the part where Shaq is wrong: Giving Joe Johnson a reasonable contract would not have impacted the overall health of the league. Under the old system, the players got 57 percent of basketball related income guaranteed — if the owners were smart and frugal with deals and came in under that percentage, then they had to write a supplemental check to cover the difference. Which is exactly what happened last season (and the players are just getting those checks now).

So whether it was bad deals or good ones, the players were going to get a cut the owners say is too high.

However, Shaq is spot on about the market size and owners writing contracts they knew they couldn’t afford. There was a buzz last summer that the Hawks wanted to keep Johnson at any cost to keep the fan base happy and the Atlanta Spirit ownership group was good with this oversized deal because they planned to sell the team and not be around for what will be the ugly end of that contract.

Middle and small market teams made terrible decisions about contracts then want out of them. They want protection from themselves. Don’t kid yourself, that is part of the “competitive balance” argument, that the Lakers can overpay Luke Walton and eat the deal then get another player, an option other markets don’t have.

In the end, I think even the owners would admit they have been part of the problem. But should the players have to pay for that?