Tag: Linsanity

Jeremy Lin; Tyson Chandler; Landry Fields

Video: Jeremy Lin sinks game winning three vs. Raptors


And the legend grows — now reaching Canada.

Check out the swagger on Jeremy Lin. With the game tied 87-87 the Knicks missed a shot but got the offensive board and reset for a final shot. What does Lin do? Back the ball out to halfcourt, call for the rest of the Knicks to flatten out along the baseline so he can isolate against Jose Calderon, then drains the game winning pull-up three.

Toronto owned this game for the first three quarters. They outworked and out classed the Knicks, particularly in the backcourt where Calderon put up 12 points in the first quarter on his way to 25 for the game. Toronto was very physical with Lin and forced him into tough shots. Amare Stoudemire was back and finished with 21 (on 22 shots) but you know there is rust when Aaron Gray is blocking his shots. New York struggled to reintegrate him into the offense. The Raptors led by as many as 17.

Then came the fourth quarter. The Knicks upped their defensive pressure and the Raptors turned the ball over nine times in 12 minutes, shot 33 percent and scored just 12 points. Lin scored 12 points in the quarter.

And when the game was on the line, he was magic.

Linsanity knows no bounds, no boarders. Canada has been indoctrinated.

And that is six straight wins for the Knicks (with the Kings on tap Wednesday). Lin finished with 27. But that felt like just part of the story.

“Linsanity” has gone all the way to U.S. Patent office. Literally.

Jeremy Lin

The only thing more American than the rise of Jeremy Lin — the Rocky-like tale of a talented but overlooked player, twice let go, sent to the D-League, never gives up and explodes when given the chance — is other people trying to make a quick buck his rise.

Which brings us to this note out of Bloomberg Tuesday:

Yenchin Chang, a 35-year-old Alhambra, California, resident, was the first of two people to file a trademark application for the term “Linsanity,” which is being used to describe the frenzy surrounding New York Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin. …

“I wanted to be a part of the excitement,” Chang, who attended East Los Angeles College and who works in the import/export business, said in a telephone interview. “I’m very proud of Jeremy.”

Chang, like Lin, is Taiwanese but Chang said the two are not connected.

In theory, Chang would get compensated for anything sold with “Linsanity” on it. But making this work in practice is another matter.

Milord A. Keshishian, an attorney with Milord & Associates, a patent, trademark and copyright firm in Los Angeles, said in a telephone interview that the law “doesn’t bode well” for anyone trying to make money through a Linsanity trademark.

“This looks like a bad-faith attempt to profit from Jeremy Lin’s recent acclaim,” he said of the trademark applications.

But trying to make a quick buck, that’s about as American as it comes. You knew somebody would try.

Video: Talking “Linsanity” with Amar’e, ‘Melo and Lin

New York Knicks' Lin is congratulated by teammates Jordan and Fields after win against Timberwolves in Minneapolis
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Tonight Linsanity — AKA the New York Knicks — goes north of the border to Toronto.

Amar’e Stoudemire will be back in the starting lineup and he talks about liking what he sees. Of course he does, he’s got a PG who can run the pick-and-roll again. We told you already Carmelo Anthony is happy not to have to play the point forward role (and should be back around the end of the week).

And Jeremy Lin says he thinks blending in two elite scorers is going to work. Of course he does, what kind of point guard would he be if he said they wouldn’t?