Tag: LeBron

Oklahoma City Thunder vs Miami Heat

Kevin Durant, LeBron James trade shots for 14 points in 2 minutes (VIDEO)


When the Heat and Thunder face off we get a rare treat — the two best players in the game who actually go head-to-head for a stretch. LeBron James and Kevin Garnett guard each other. They want to show each other up.

And for a couple of minutes late in the third quarter of Oklahoma City’s Wednesday night win over the Heat, they went back and forth at each other and put on quite a show.

On the night Durant got the better of James — they scored almost the same points (33 for Durant, 34 for LeBron) but Durant had the bigger impact on the game with 7 rebounds and 5 assists, being part of a Thunder team that showed fantastic ball movement all night. LeBron had 3 rebounds and 3 assists and the Heat turned the ball over 20 times.

LeBron: “I can understand why a lot of people were upset”

Not shown: hair on LeBron's forehead.

LeBron James understands where you are coming from, you haters.

He’s backtracked from how he handled “The Decision” for some time now, said he wouldn’t want to change the choice but does wish he had gone about it differently. He and those around the announcement thought the show was all for a good cause, not seeing the wider reaction to an hour show talking about where he would play basketball (and ripping the heart out of Cleveland on national television).

He said basically the same thing to the Guardian in London, adding he understands the anger people had now.

Was James taken aback by the ferocious criticism of his screening of “The Decision”? “Um, yeah. I was surprised by it because I was making a decision for myself. I was doing something that I believed was going to make me happy and freshen me up. But looking back I can understand why a lot of people were upset. That definitely wasn’t my intention: to upset people.”

Does he wish he could change what he did in the summer of 2010? “I can’t say I would change anything – because it would change so much that is leading to the future. But, yeah, there is definitely a better way I could have handled it, as far as the whole TV thing is concerned, and the same goes for the build-up to the announcement. A lot of people were hurt by it – and I definitely apologize to them. At the same time, you should never be afraid to do what you believe in.”

This is really a good interview and you should go read the whole thing. Especially if you are a Liverpool fan.

LeBron is becoming much more polished with his interviews. He talked about the lockout but steers clear of stepping in that land mine by being pretty dull. He also talks about losing in the 2011 NBA finals and how that will help him going forward whenever there is a season.

When did he get over the loss? “A couple of days ago,” he says, laughing wryly. “It stayed with me a couple of months. It was definitely heartbreaking. [But] I really believe it’s made me a better player. And I’m a better person as well for it – just in terms of focusing harder, zeroing in even more. It’s made me critique my game and work out who I am as a person. We faced a great team in Dallas and I don’t think enough people gave them the credit they deserve.”

We’ll see how much that loss helped LeBron and the Heat. Actually, I just hope we get to test that hypothesis this season.

Video: LeBron James freezes up on high dive

LeBron James

Just insert your own “LeBron James freezes up in a big moment” joke right here. I’ve run out of them.

Here is the video of LeBron walking out to a high dive in Barcelona — one built for the 1992 Olympics — and freezing up, hesitating to jump (via The Basketball Jones). He eventually makes the leap, but not until the DJ spins Jay Z and Kanye West dropping his name, then someone shows him up.

By the way, if LeBron walked up to the edge of that platform and looked down, saw how far it was and realized he has $85 million left on his contract that could be voided if he got injured, and then took a step back, I’m good with that. That is the voice of sanity and maturity. We all just have to power through that.

LeBron’s former teammate sees two sides of the man


Lance Allred is one of the more interesting guys in the NBA — legally deaf (and a very good lip reader), raised Mormon, in his youth part of a polygamous sect (that he and his family have renounced) and one of those people who has been in the NBA but comes with a broader perspective than most.

Plus, he’s a published author. Now twice over.

His second book is Basketball Gods and it is his personal journey. Some of that is NBA (and D-League and Summer League), some of that is how his travels through the game changed him as a religious person, how his deafness provides a different view of the league. His insights are fascinating.

That includes some interesting insights on LeBron James — Allred was a teammate with him in Cleveland, a backup center in 2007-08. Allred did a Q&A with USA Today and when asked about LeBron he gave a thoughtful answer. One shaded in grays rather than the black and white often used.

As with every human, LeBron has many good qualities as well as qualities that could use some work. But as a teammate, there were many times when I first arrived at Cleveland that LeBron went out of his way with small, simple gestures to help me feel welcome, when he did not need to. But he did anyway. But then there were days where he was simply having a bad day, like all of us do.

At times, the PR machine around LeBron does not best represent him as a person. Maybe as a celebrity, but not as a person. He has many good qualities that maybe are not shown to the world, as some may fear it is less than cool or masculine, that it does not feed into his superhuman persona. Often times when I see or hear some of the drama around LeBron, I think I could really help him as far as PR goes, that I would be able to give some good insight. And I wouldn’t cost very much, maybe 10 dollars or so. But, if Bron wanted my input I think he would have already asked for it a long time ago.

In this current phase of our American economy, people are looking for targets to be angry at. They can’t be angry at the faceless people on Wall Street. But they can be angry at the LeBron, because he is visible and somewhat accessible in the character that he plays every night on the court. Thus, people are able to turn on the TV and project their fear and anger on to him, and he is okay with doing it, because that is only a character he is playing. When the lights turn off and we go home, we are often far different people than the athletes you see on the court.

Rick Barry say’s LeBron’s coaches are problem, Rick Carlisle disagrees

Erik Spoelstra

The one person that matters — Pat Riley — thinks Heat coach Erik Spoelstra did a good job this season. At least good enough to be back for a second season.

That hasn’t stopped people outside the team from speculating about Spoelstra’s future and what kind of job he did.

That includes Rick Barry, the NBA Hall of Famer who was on KHTK in Sacramento (via Sports Radio Interviews) and took a swipe at all the coaches LeBron has had, including Spoelstra. Barry was asked what LeBron needs to work on this summer.

“His shot, first and foremost, because I think that’s where it all comes down to. If you don’t have confidence in your shot, it destroys the rest of your game. … Then, little nuances, facing up, learning how to be the guy learning to use y0ur first dribble to go by instead of everything off the dribble … learning how to use screens probably, then of course the coach running more plays for him where he can run off double and triple staggered screens, learning to curl it properly, learning how to do the little things in the game which, unfortunately, have not been taught to him, which I don’t blame him for. I blame the people who have coached him over the years. To have a talent like this and to not maximize the full potential of this talent is inexcusable and reprehensible to me and the coaches who have had him should be ashamed of themselves.”

So… Barry wants to take the ball out of LeBron’s hands as a shot creator (and one of the best passers in the game) and use him like Ray Allen? You can decide for yourself if you think that is wise.

Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle came to Spoelstra’s defense — unsolicited — on Wednesday, according to ESPN Dallas.

“Listen, I would like to say one thing about Miami if I could,” Carlisle said. “I thought Erik Spoelstra had the toughest job in basketball with that team because of the way the team came together and because of the unbelievably high expectations…

“My hat’s off to Erik and the job he did,” Carlisle said. “It was extremely difficult, extremely trying. We went through a lot of difficult times before we got to our moment. Their time will definitely come.”

You can choose to go Carlisle — the guy who just coached his team to the NBA title — or Barry.