Tag: LeBron to Miami

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Six

LeBron wants Cleveland fans to know he misses them


I’ll take “things that will not go over well” for $200, Alex…

Cleveland fans will never forgive LeBron James. They see his move to Miami as a betrayal and abandonment, his public announcement of it the ultimate insult.

LeBron isn’t looking for their for forgivenss, but he tweeted (when anwering fans questions) that he misses them.


(Via Eye on Basketball)

Some will say this is just him trying to repair his image, and Clevelanders will not care. But I think this really is sincere. I think he does love Akron and Cleveland and sees what he did as purely a business move. Others may not see it that way, but he does. And Cleveland fans were good to him for many years.

Which is part of the reason they will not be forgiving.

LeBron says week after finals loss was worst he ever had

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Six

A Miami Heat team in it’s first season together went all the way to the NBA finals before losing to a Dallas Mavericks team that found it’s stride after years together. That chemistry was part of the difference in that series.

Watching the Heat lose was something fans everywhere and Kevin Love savored.

You should know LeBron James says that loss stung. Badly.

He spoke with Hoopshype and said this about the week after the NBA finals.

LJ: It was the worst week I ever had. I hate losing.

What did you do?

LJ: I did nothing. Nothing at all.

LeBron did say that he thought the Heat making it to the finals in their first year together made it a successful season. He said that living in Miami was an adjustment because he’d never lived outside Ohio before. And he gave props to Clevelanders when asked what comes to his mind about that city.

Passionate. Passionate fans who love their sports. Love the Indians, love the Browns, love the Cavaliers… And I have a lot of respect for them.

Okay commenters, have at him.

One year ago today, LeBron made “The Decision”

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It someday may go down with the most legendary player moves in NBA history — Kareem Abdul-Jabbar to the Lakers, Dirk Nowitzki to the Mavs (on draft night for Tractor Traylor), and the Celtics turning Joe Barry Carroll into Kevin McHale and Robert Parrish.

One year ago today, LeBron James told Jim Gray and the world he was taking his talents to South Beach.

No doubt, it created a backlash. But the energy it created helped propel the league to television ratings and popularity levels the NBA had not seen in a decade.

It changed the landscape of the NBA. It changed the popularity of the NBA. It changed the “We are all Witnesses” billboard in Cleveland. It changed the way we all think about Comic Sans font.

It will someday be looked back on as a move that made or broke LeBron James’ career.

It was a decision that some said on a basketball level was LeBron trying to take the easy way out. As if Bill Russell, Jerry West, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird and Michael Jordan were not been surrounded by great talent. The difference was LeBron decided to move to the talent – rather than having things built around him — and that changed the equation. Rather than be the “alpha male” LeBron, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh decided to team up. Some saw that as a sign of weakness, some saw that as smart.

The fear that choice struck in the hearts of small-market owners is part of the reason we have a lockout today. The fall that the Cavaliers took — both on the court and in the overall value of the franchise — made some smaller market owners dig in their heels for this lockout, demanding a system where they could compete and had a better chance to keep their stars.

It was a decision that was widely slammed for how it was handled. LeBron’s people thought they were improving his brand — based on television ratings you could argue they were right — but it left him as one of the most polarizing figures in all of sport. It was a decision that — along with the pep rally in Miami — became a public relations nightmare. The Heat are hated or loved.

What we will think of “The Decision” in a decade is impossible to say. Some will always say it was a decision of ego and an easy way to a title. But winning can change the story’s ending. And we don’t know how it ends.

But one year ago today, everything changed.

Winderman: Something good did come out of “The Decision”

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The one-year anniversary is just over a month away.

As television, “The Decision” ranks somewhere up there with “Manimal” and “B.J. and the Bear.”

But unlike those Neilson losers, “The Decision,” to a degree, continues to rate as meaningful media.

From this travesty, there actually has been a payoff.

Thursday, as he prepared for Game 2 of the NBA Finals, LeBron James again spoke of how the medium was perhaps not best for his message when it came to that nationally televised announcement that he would be leaving the Cleveland Cavaliers for the Miami Heat in free agency. But he also spoke about a message that might have been lost in the equation, but one that still resonates 11 months later.

Not only was $2 million raised for the Boys & Girls Clubs of America with the broadcast of his announcement at a Greenwich, Conn., club, but James said dividends continue to be paid.

“Of course it overshadowed what my main objective was, which was rightfully so, I understand,” he said, yet again distancing himself from that awkward moment.

“But it doesn’t matter. These kids are benefitting from it. There are so many clubs that are opening, not only here in Miami, but Cleveland and Akron and New York, Los Angeles.”

James said he has visited several club, increasingly appreciative of the mission.

“They get an opportunity to not only shed light on themselves, but to their community they’re in, to try to get them off the streets, after school,” he said. “And that’s the main thing. That’s when a lot of bad things happen with kids, after school, they don’t have anything to do. The Boys & Girls Club of America have done a great job and I’m just glad I was able to be a part of it and to shed light on it.”

Of course, he’s now keeping many of those same kids up way past their bedtimes.

Asked if he felt the youth of America are watching him to the finish of these games that are approaching midnight in the East, he said, “Absolutely.”

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat.