Tag: LeBron to Heat


LeBron biographer goes way down the hater rabbit hole


You knew Scott Raab’s book on LeBron James was not going to be a love letter when the working title was “The Whore of Akron.”

Now that is the official title and the book is close to being ready for your Kindle (it’s released Nov. 15). To pimp it, Esquire has an excerpt (which shouldn’t be a shock, Raab writes for Esquire).(Hat tip to Eye on Basketball.)

While he has the right to write a book for Cleveland LeBron haters, to mock LeBron’s hairline and arrogance and the entire city of Miami, I think there are lines of decency not to be crossed. And Raab dances over one of them.

Lord. This is where LeBron James wants to play basketball, in front of sun-dried cretins who must be bribed to act as if they care about the game and the team. Where another superstar already is the Man in the locker room and on the court; where nobody in the media will ever mention his collapse against Boston, his phantom elbow pain, and his steadfast refusal to hold himself accountable for his team’s big-game failures.

For as long as I’ve been a fan, I’ve rooted hard against certain teams and players, but never have I hoped to see a career-ending injury — until tonight.

For me, that’s a step too far.

I think I fall in with most people — LeBron had the right to leave Cleveland for Miami, he just handled it about as poorly as one could. I don’t have a problem with him teaming up with other stars because loaded teams have been what wins in the NBA since before the Celtics owned the 60s with their loaded team. But the television announcement — for charity or not — was a major miscalculation. As was the pep rally for ticket holders (remember, there no longer is a “local media”). The move is one thing, the arrogance with which it appeared to be done is another. I think we’ve all been down that road, and most of us have now moved on.

(As an aside, the powerlessness smaller market owners felt watching LeBron choose to leave for less money is part of the reason we still have a lockout stuck on “system issues.” The owners mask it as “competitive balance” but in part what they really want is ways to keep their stars while moving their role players around more easily to build winners around those stars. What LeBron did flat out scared some owners because he had all the power.)

For me, it’s an entire other thing to wish injury on a person who makes his living with his body.

But if you still have venom left for LeBron (as opposed to some for the NBA owners and players union), then you will love Raab’s excerpt and book. Check it out.

LeBron wants Cleveland fans to know he misses them

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Six

I’ll take “things that will not go over well” for $200, Alex…

Cleveland fans will never forgive LeBron James. They see his move to Miami as a betrayal and abandonment, his public announcement of it the ultimate insult.

LeBron isn’t looking for their for forgivenss, but he tweeted (when anwering fans questions) that he misses them.


(Via Eye on Basketball)

Some will say this is just him trying to repair his image, and Clevelanders will not care. But I think this really is sincere. I think he does love Akron and Cleveland and sees what he did as purely a business move. Others may not see it that way, but he does. And Cleveland fans were good to him for many years.

Which is part of the reason they will not be forgiving.

Dwyane Wade says Chris Bosh coming to Miami was key to his return


Thumbnail image for wade_bosh.jpgDwyane Wade and Chris Bosh went on ESPN Wednesday morning and made it official — they are both going to be playing for the Miami Heat next season.

There was nothing else shocking in their interview, but they confirmed things already suggested in the media.

Like that Wade seriously considered playing for his hometown Chicago Bulls. However, once he took his emotions out of the equation the key for him was Bosh.

“But it came down to Chris, and his decision to come here… unfortunately it did not work out, but Chicago still has my heart,” Wade said of his hometown.

Both men said that with the two of them — and whatever players are brought in — they expect to be able to compete for titles immediately.

Both men said there would be no changing their decisions (they cannot sign deals until tomorrow), but both also danced around questions of years and money. Wade could take a six-year max deal in the $120 million range. Bosh could get the same thing if Toronto agrees to a sign-and-trade deal. If not, his max deal could only be five-years and a little under $100 million.

That is, unless LeBron James comes to Miami with them. Then they might all have to take a pay cut to play together.

Wade played the LeBron situation politically correct — that he’d love to play with James but said James has to make his own decision. Wade said this was about him and Bosh.

“This opportunity for Chris and I to team up, (for me) to team up with someone of his caliber as a basketball players, was too good,” Wade said.

Bosh was candid in saying he enjoyed he free agency process, but that this was the best decision.

“I wanted to choose the best decision for me and my family and this was the best situation for me,” Bosh said.

There was nothing new or terribly interesting in their first public statements — they hit their talking points and stuck to the script like rehearsed pros.

But they made it official — tomorrow Wade and Bosh will sign with the Miami Heat. And suddenly that franchise is back to being a potential contender.