Tag: LeBron James Decision

Olympics Day 14 - Basketball

‘Melo talks to LeBron, adds situations are different


Not a lot of people have been in Carmelo Anthony’s shoes — a legitimate NBA superstar pushing his way to a new team at the peak of his career.

One guy who did — LeBron James. Anthony told the media Wednesday he and LeBron have spoken recently, but added the situations are very different (via the twitter of Chris Tomasson of FanHouse).

I wouldn’t compare my situation to (James’). It’s kind of different for me because I’m actually playing through it whereas for him he dealt with it in the offseason. (LeBron) just tells me to stay strong and keep doing what I’m doing and keep going out there and playing the way I’m playing.

Both players have been accused of having a massive ego driving their decisions. But I would argue that what Anthony has done with the Nuggets is infinitely fairer to the franchise — he has essentially given them notice he is gone. Like you would to your boss (if you liked your job). He is giving them a chance to get some value for him and jumpstart the rebuilding process. You may not like the process or how it’s been done, but in two years the Nuggets will be in a better place than the Cavaliers because Anthony essentially gave them notice.

Anthony and James can talk about it face-to-face Thursday, when the Heat take on the Nuggets in Denver.

Paul Silas says LeBron treated Cavaliers just like teams treat players

Cavaliers v Wizards

Among the seemingly innumerable things LeBron James has been criticized for — from the legitimate to the ludicrous — was the complaint that he needed to let Cleveland know much farther in advance he was gone. If he was not coming back, he had an obligation to let them know so they could get something for him in a trade rather than him just walking away and crushing the franchise.

Poppycock, said Bobcats coach Paul Silas. Remember that Silas was LeBron’s first coach in Cleveland so when the Bobcats took on the Heat Monday he was asked about it.

“I’ve been on buses where the general manager gets on the bus and tells a player he’s traded. They don’t (let) him know ahead of time,” Silas said. “Why should (James) let people know? He did what he wanted to do and he had that right. He gave the Cavaliers seven great years.”

It’s true that often teams give players no warning about uprooting their families and lives and sending them across the nation.

As Henry Abbot wisely points out at TrueHoop, how you view what LeBron did in not notifying the Cavaliers goes to how you view their relationship. If it is simply employee/company and he fulfilled his contract then he has every right to leave without notice. But if you view sports more like a marriage with cooperation between to highly profitable ventures (players and franchise), then leaving without notice like that is cold and cruel. The fans of Cleveland certainly felt that way, but that is different from the business itself.

As with most things, the truth likely is in the middle somewhere and not always crystal clear. I’ve said before that I think how Carmelo Anthony is dealing with Denver – as ugly as it is and will play out to be — is more fair to the organization than what LeBron ended up doing.

But when did LeBron really know he was leaving? Remember that throughout last season and up to the playoff loss to Boston — and even after it for many — it was believed LeBron would stay. Views were conflicting, but that was the conventional wisdom and every leak seemed to say Cleveland was certainly in the mix.

If Cleveland really was in the mix until the end than I’m not sure how you ask LeBron to treat them a lot differently. Call a day or week earlier, does that really change anything? However, if Cleveland was out of the picture before the trading deadline (or was never really in the picture at all) then what he did was pretty cold.

I tend to think he didn’t really plan to leave; rather he planned to bring Chris Bosh or someone else in. He only left when that didn’t work and Miami presented itself. And if that is true, the unfortunate ending of the LeBron and Cavaliers relationship may never have played out much differently.

LeBron James on 2010: “I’m a happy man right now”

LeBron James

New Year’s Eve is a time for reflection. And champagne. And singing Robert Burns. But also reflection.

LeBron James was asked to reflect on his year – where he and his decision were the biggest story in the NBA and maybe all of sports — by Brian Windhorst at ESPN. LeBron mostly chose to look forward.

“I learned a lot, 2010 was a new beginning for me, well, I’d say late 2010 was a new beginning,” James said.

“It was a new start. All the decisions I made through 2010, I’ll live with. Some were better than others. But I’m a happy man right now so I’m excited what 2011 has to bring.”

Quote of the Day: Dan Gilbert is over LeBron. He means it. Really.

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“I’m over it. I really am. That’s the truth,” he said. “I let it all out in about 24 hours. I just think we have such a great core and a great coaching staff. We have a lot of opportunities with the trade exception and the draft. I feel good about this team.”

—Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert talking about LeBron James and the Heat’s return to Cleveland. Why do I believe him about like I believed Rick was over Ilsa in “Casablanca?” Why do I think he’ll see LeBron and it will be more like Lloyd and Mary in “Dumb and Dumber?

More police, ban on anti-LeBron clothing set for his return to Cleveland

Courting LeBron Basketball

One week from today, LeBron James returns to Cleveland… and Cleveland is ready.

The fans have prepped their voices and insults, and the Cavaliers and Cleveland police are ready to make sure it stops right there. Chris Broussard at ESPN detailed the plans:

To ensure James’ safety, there will be dozens of extra police officers on hand, both uniformed and undercover. Officers will be stationed inside and outside the arena, and many will be positioned by the Heat bench and at the tunnel where the Heat players will enter the court.

“Honestly, I’m a little bit afraid,” one member of the Cavs organization said. “Some people don’t care. Their mentality is ‘‘I’ve got to get this off my chest.’ There’s so much negative energy around this game. People aren’t excited about the game itself. They’re just like, ‘‘I can’t wait to do something.'”

The team has done research on the various crude and offensive James T-shirts in circulation locally, and officials will be stationed at entrances to make sure no fans enter with such shirts or signs that disrespect James or his family members. They’ll also be in the stands, authorized to take away inappropriate apparel. Fans who have such shirts will be required to remove them and then will be given a Cavaliers-branded T-shirt to wear instead. All inappropriate signs also will be confiscated and officials will be on the lookout throughout the game for inebriated fans or fans who are preparing to throw things onto the court.

Maybe it’s the tryptophan talking, but I have high hopes that the people of Cleveland are not going to go way over the top; that cooler heads will prevail. There will be yelling and booing and some well-crafted words (and some not-so-well-crafted words), but hopefully, that’s where fans will draw the line.

At the end of the day, it’s basketball. The people of Cleveland have genuinely important things to be thankful for and to be concerned about, and LeBron isn’t one of them.