Tag: LeBron James Decision

Miami Heat v Atlanta Hawks

LeBron happy in Miami, was “truthful” about Cleveland


The day after LeBron James offered an olive branch to Cleveland and opened the door a little on his possible return to play for the Cavaliers someday, you knew there would be a day of follow up questions. Because it’s LeBron and Cleveland and perspective goes out the window when those two things meet.

LeBron did not back down from his statement that he could possibly someday return to play in Cleveland, but he reiterated that day is not going to be anytime soon.

Some Heat fans got worried, for reasons I frankly can’t understand, but LeBron had to tell them to calm down. Here’s the quote, via our man Ira Winderman of the Sun Sentinel.

“Nah, they shouldn’t be worried at all,” he said. “I love the fans in Miami and I’m here. The question was basically could I see myself playing back here. I said, ‘yeah,’ in the sense of I don’t know what my future holds and I don’t want to take that out, but I mean I love the fans of Miami and I got everything invested with this team and I’m looking forward to the years to come.”

LeBron has gotten used to the fact that everything he says or does gets blown up.

“I mean I’m already on ‘LeBron Watch,’ ” he said with a smile. “For the most part, everything I do is a ‘LeBron Watch.’ Like I said, my mindset is on this season. My mindset is on helping this team win a championship and continuing to get better every day.”

LeBron is going to be a member of the Heat for years. He can’t predict what will be happening in his life and the NBA five years from now no more than you or me or anyone else can. So he tried to leave a door open.

Can we move on now?

LeBron says he would consider return to Cavaliers. Someday.

LeBron James Cavaliers

LeBron James, peacemaker with Cleveland.

Not that the wounds there can ever be fully healed, but he’s trying. He extended an olive branch Thursday, again saying he handled leaving poorly and he would someday consider returning. At least he’s trying to say all the right things.

The Heat are in Cleveland to take on the Cavs Friday, and here are LeBron’s direct quotes, via Brian Windhorst of ESPN’s Heat Index. Starting with him answering if he would consider a return to the Cavaliers.

“I think it would be great, it would be fun to play in front of these fans again,” James said after the Heat’s practice Thursday at Quicken Loans Arena.

“I had a lot of fun times here. You can’t predict the future. Hopefully you continue to stay healthy. I’m here as a Miami player and I’m happy where I am now but I don’t rule that out in any sense. If I decide to come back, hopefully the fans will accept me….

“I don’t hold grudges, I hold them a little bit but I don’t hold them that long,” James said. “(Cavs owner Dan Gilbert) said what he said out of anger. He probably would want to take that back, but I made a mistake, too. There’s some things I’d want to take back as well. You learn from your mistakes and move on.”

Is there anything LeBron does rule out, that he doesn’t flirt with? He might do the dunk contest, he might return to Cleveland, he might eat at Lola Bistro after the game. Or he might not. Frankly, he likely will not do any of those things. (Although he should eat at Lola.) He keeps his options open.

James isn’t going anywhere soon — his legacy rests with the Heat now. He has to win titles (multiple) there to reach the levels he seeks. There is no turning back from the decision now. He has two more years on his deal with an option for two after that, and he’s not leaving in that span.

But could he end his career back with the Cavs? Could he and Gilbert make up? Stranger things have happened.

LeBron biographer goes way down the hater rabbit hole


You knew Scott Raab’s book on LeBron James was not going to be a love letter when the working title was “The Whore of Akron.”

Now that is the official title and the book is close to being ready for your Kindle (it’s released Nov. 15). To pimp it, Esquire has an excerpt (which shouldn’t be a shock, Raab writes for Esquire).(Hat tip to Eye on Basketball.)

While he has the right to write a book for Cleveland LeBron haters, to mock LeBron’s hairline and arrogance and the entire city of Miami, I think there are lines of decency not to be crossed. And Raab dances over one of them.

Lord. This is where LeBron James wants to play basketball, in front of sun-dried cretins who must be bribed to act as if they care about the game and the team. Where another superstar already is the Man in the locker room and on the court; where nobody in the media will ever mention his collapse against Boston, his phantom elbow pain, and his steadfast refusal to hold himself accountable for his team’s big-game failures.

For as long as I’ve been a fan, I’ve rooted hard against certain teams and players, but never have I hoped to see a career-ending injury — until tonight.

For me, that’s a step too far.

I think I fall in with most people — LeBron had the right to leave Cleveland for Miami, he just handled it about as poorly as one could. I don’t have a problem with him teaming up with other stars because loaded teams have been what wins in the NBA since before the Celtics owned the 60s with their loaded team. But the television announcement — for charity or not — was a major miscalculation. As was the pep rally for ticket holders (remember, there no longer is a “local media”). The move is one thing, the arrogance with which it appeared to be done is another. I think we’ve all been down that road, and most of us have now moved on.

(As an aside, the powerlessness smaller market owners felt watching LeBron choose to leave for less money is part of the reason we still have a lockout stuck on “system issues.” The owners mask it as “competitive balance” but in part what they really want is ways to keep their stars while moving their role players around more easily to build winners around those stars. What LeBron did flat out scared some owners because he had all the power.)

For me, it’s an entire other thing to wish injury on a person who makes his living with his body.

But if you still have venom left for LeBron (as opposed to some for the NBA owners and players union), then you will love Raab’s excerpt and book. Check it out.

Video: “The Decision Remix” by DJ Steve Porter

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Six

This is the last trip down memory lane about the decision, but this is more than worth it.

DJ Steve Porter — the video mashup artist responsible for Press Hop and Press Hop 2 among others — put together a look back at the year for LeBron and put together this video. Which is impressive.


Creators of “The Decision” stunned by backlash (and other details of event)

Image (1) lebron_decision-thumb-250x191-15508.jpg for post 6206

On the eve of a lockout that — if it does end up costing games — will kill the momentum around the league, let’s look back at the thing that helped create all that momentum and the increased ratings: LeBron James’ Decision.

The television show sparked interest from casual fans that carried over to increased television ratings this season, increased attendance and a real uptick in popularity of the NBA. Sure, much of it may have been people tuning in to root against the Heat (and thereby adopting Dirk Nowitzki as their own), but there is no doubt that is part of what fueled the increased interest in the league.

The backlash of The Decision caught the creators of the show by surprise, they told Zach Lowe of Sports Illustrated in a fascinating look at how the production of the show came together.

(Mark Dowley, former partner at the William Morris Endeavor agency who helped set up the show in Greenwich): We got a lot of grief for it. A good deed never goes unpunished, you know? LeBron is an exceptionally bright young man. No one is taking advantage of LeBron James. And Maverick Carter is a very bright guy. I’ve done deals with them since and we’ll do deals with them in the future. Everybody can hold their heads up high. The only people who know best about how they felt [about the criticism] are Maverick and LeBron. There is no way they enjoyed a lot of the aftermath. I do know morally and from a socially conscience standpoint, they know they did something good (for the Boys & Girls Club).

The guy who really got wronged was Jim Gray. The whole original idea was Jim’s and Ari’s and Maverick’s. I thought Jim did a hell of a job. He’s quite a gentleman. This was sports, after all, not U.N. wartime reporting. People just got a little nuts over it.

Gray only got wronged if you thought the idea of announcing where a basketball player would play next season in an hour television broadcast was a good idea in the first place. It wasn’t. Instant reaction in the public at the time — before anyone knew where LeBron was going to play, just the reaction to idea of a special to make the announcement — was an obvious precursor to the backlash that followed. The fact nobody else helping put this together anticipated this kind of reaction speaks to how in touch they really are with the feelings of fans.

Go read the entire SI report, there are fascinating details on the event itself. How LeBron did not sign autographs for the kids at the club (he was on too tight a schedule, people say) and how the kids really flocked more to Kanye West anyway. How Greenwich was chosen because it was seen as neutral ground. How it was apparently the Greenwich police that leaked the location that those involved had tried to keep secret.

In the end, those involved are proud of the money raised for the Boys & Girls club. And that is no doubt a noble cause and the money has and will be put to good use.

And the NBA has seen a bump in business in part because of it. Does all of that end up making it a good idea to do The Decision? I personally still can’t convince myself it was.