Tag: LeBron James announcement


LeBron reiterates: “I think I would do it a little different.”

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He’s said this before, it’s ground we’ve covered. But because today he and the Heat were in New Jersey — game one of the “We were scored by LeBron James tour” 2010 — it came up again.

Would LeBron handle things differently? Ira Winderman of the Sun Sentinel had his answer.

“If I had a do-over, I think I would do it a little different.

“But I’m comfortable, I’m happy with my decision that I’ve made to come to this team.”

I sounds he’s come to peace with this summer the same way the rest of us have — fine with the choice, didn’t love how it was handled.

The decision of where to play is one he earned the right to make by playing out his contract in Cleveland. He had the right to go wherever, and the fact he took less money (not a ton, but still less) speaks to a desire to win that we say we want our players to have. The “he wasn’t man enough to do it himself” argument was always crap because not MJ, not Magic, not Bird, not Duncan, not Kareem — nobody has won a title by themselves without top-flight players around them. Charles Barkley tried, and he is ringless.

Might he have handled the announcement differently? Had the parade of teams coming to genuflect before him done differently? Had “The Decision” done differently or not at all? Yea, he might, sounds like he would rethink it.

He’s said it all before, he likely will say it again.

In the end, as a society we forgive athletes who win. Not fair, but it is reality. He will never be forgiven in Cleveland, but that was true if he left for any other team. But if LeBron and the Heat win rings, this will be a footnote to his legacy, nothing more.

LeBron James says race played role in backlash to his decision


Thumbnail image for lebron_decision.jpgDid race play a role in the backlash — both in the media and in the general public — to LeBron James’ decision to take his talents to South Beach?

LeBron James and his business partner and close friend Maverick Carter both said yes in an interview on CNN Wednesday night (hat tip to Jason Lloyd of the Beacon Journal, and we should note race was a very small part of this interview, discussed and everyone moved on).

“I think so at times. It’s always a race factor,” LeBron said as part of a segment that focused largely on Carter.

“It definitely played a role in some of the stuff coming out of the media, things that were written,” Carter said.

A lot of the backlash seemed to be focused less on the choice itself — outside of Cleveland, anyway — and more on what came off as an egotistical way to do it. But both Carter and James said that “The Decision” — the hour-long show on ESPN announcing his move to Miami — may have had something to do with that.

“The execution could’ve been a little better and I take some of blame for that,” Carter said.

But James noted that the event raised $3 million for the Boys & Girls Club and any “heat” he took was worth it.

There certainly has been a lot of LeBron hate. The numbers back up what James and Carter have said about race.

Among blacks, LeBron’s positive Q rating among dropped from 52 percent in January to 39 — however his negative Q rating barely changed, going from 14 percent to 15. Blacks seemed to change what they thought of him, but to a more neutral stance.

Among non-blacks, LeBron’s negative Q rating went from 24 percent to 44 after the decision.

Why different races reacted to the situation in very different ways would make an interesting study in race relations in America.

Cavaliers Mo Williams almost walked away after LeBron's decision


mwilliams_stand.jpgHow depressed was Mo Williams after LeBron James decided he was taking his talents to South Beach? After watching his coach and GM leave and realize the Cavaliers were starting over.

How about walking away from $26 million depressed. In a refreshingly honest interview by Marc Spears of Yahoo, Mo Williams said he almost walked away from all that money left on his contract. He almost quit.

“That’s how bad it got,” Williams said. “I contemplated it. I really sat down and envisioned life after basketball. …I really saw myself not playing.

“It just didn’t make sense to me. …It doesn’t make sense to me.”

Williams vented that the night of the decision, tweeting about denial, bargaining and seeming to move through the stages of grief. He was expressing what the Cavaliers fans throughout Ohio.

In a matter of moments the Cavaliers went from a title contender to a team that will struggle to make the playoffs. It’s a huge drop, and an emotionally devastating one for real competitors. The entire

“This summer was very, very stressful for me,” Williams said. “I really lost a lot of love for the game this summer.

“You play this game for one reason. You play to win games and win championships. I couldn’t understand why a lot of things were happening to our organization, to a really good basketball team. I couldn’t really understand it. And when you don’t understand things, it can really stress you out.”

The business of basketball can suck the fun out of it.

Williams has a lot on his shoulders. Now he will have to take on a big role, the point guard who is one of only a handful of players on this team who can create his own shot. He is a leader.

He will work hard, he will have big nights. But he knows it will not be the same.

LeBron now sixth most hated sports figure according to Q Score


Thumbnail image for LeBron_Heat.jpgIt didn’t take a rocket scientist to know that LeBron James’s popularity had taken a hit in the wake of his move this summer and “The Decision.” The ability to read and log on to message boards could have told you that.

Now we have some numbers to back it up.

CNBC’s sports business reporter Darren Rovell got LeBron’s Q Score numbers, which show his popularity nationally. And things aren’t good.

In January 2010, The Q Scores Company took a poll of the general population and found that 24 percent of people thought of James in a positive light, compared to a 22 percent negative opinion…

 “LeBron’s positive score at that time was the highest we had ever seen it,” [Q Score Company executive vice president Henry] Schafer said….

Schafer says that now only 14 percent of the general population see him as a positive figure, a 41.6 percent drop, while 39 percent view him in a negative light, a 77 percent decline.

In fact, LeBron is now the sixth most disliked sports personality, according to The Q Score Company, behind Michael Vick, Tiger Woods, Terrell Owens, Chad Ochocinco and Kobe Bryant.

“Instead of his change to the Heat being seen as the best way he can win a championship, many have looked at it and how he chose to announce it as a selfish move,” Schafer said.

LeBron took less money to play with the other elite players and give himself the best chance to win a title. Those are things we generally laud in our sports stars (that “we expect stars to do it in one place” farce flies in the face of history). The fact this whole summer has become a LeBron negative had more to with how the announcement was handled — having the teams come to him in a very public pitch process followed by an hour long television special came off as incredibly egotistical. The backlash at that bled over into the choice itself.

But no need to tell you that. You clearly are already a hater. And it really doesn’t matter because in the fall you will all tune in to watch him.

LeBron James says he tried to repay Cleveland on the court, is ready for change


Thumbnail image for LeBron_Heat.jpgDoes LeBron James owe Cleveland anything?

LeBron has been at the center of the NBA universe this summer, but has said very little personally to the media (we’re not really counting The Decision as hard-hitting questions).

There are a lot of questions to be asked, and Lang Whitaker of SLAM covered many of them a wide-ranging Q&A with LeBron James for an upcoming edition of the magazine. LeBron does not give any shocking answers, but he emphasizes that he realized that he cannot make everyone happy and had to do what is best for himself and his family.

LeBron also talked about what he enjoyed the most about his crazy summer — and how he repaid Cleveland.

They best part of the summer for me has been change. It’s a new beginning, a new start. I’m excited about that. The seven years I had in Cleveland, I loved, and I love those fans and will always love those fans for giving me seven great years. I tried to repay those fans the right way by doing what I did on the court. But it’s been exciting. The change, to know I’m going into a situation I haven’t had since my rookie year, and that’s a new beginning, a fresh start. That’s exciting for me. It’s been a great summer. You’re going to have forks in the road, bumps in the road, throughout life. But if you have your goal and you know which way you’re headed, you just go for it and you don’t stop until you get it….

Well, I don’t feel beat up, not at all. I knew there was going to be some negative point to it. But at the end of the day, I think I made the right decision, and I’m happy with my decision. Just like you said, you can’t make everyone happy at the end of the day, and I knew that, I knew that from the beginning. And I understand. It’s OK.

As for the questions about how this team will mesh on the court….

For me, you don’t even think about knowing it will work. You know it’s going to work. You don’t say, I’m going to make my decision and hopefully this works out. D-Wade is a playmaker. I’ve played with D-Wade and I’ve played with Bosh for four years in the summertime. It’s not as long as an NBA season, but you see the sacrifices we was able to make in the summertime, so it wasn’t a hard choice for myself because I know how hard they play the game and I know how much they want to win…

Sacrifice is a part of the game. Now, if you’re talking about sacrificing a few more shots or a few plays here, that’s not a problem. The goal is to an NBA championship, and however we do that, it has to get done. That’s ultimately what we want to do. That’s also why we all came here, to win an NBA championship. It wasn’t so all of us could try to get an MVP award the same year. That’s not what it’s about.

Then there are the questions about losing to Boston in the playoffs…

We had a good chance to win that series, and we played well in spurts, but we didn’t play as consistently as Boston did. And I think every Eastern Conference team saw that when they went against Boston, how consistent they were from game to game. Now, they may have lost one game or two games, but I think they were the most consistent team in the Playoffs in the Eastern Conference. That’s why they were able to get back to the Eastern Finals.

Check out the whole interview, there is a lot more there.