Tag: Leandro Barbosa

Indiana Pacers v Orlando Magic-Blue

Report: Warriors signing Jarell Eddie in their quest to find a shooter


Stephen Curry is one of the NBA’s best 3-point shooters (maybe ever). Klay Thompson is an incredible second option from behind the arc. Draymond Green and Harrison Barnes also made more than a 3-pointer per game last season, providing nice support from the frontcourt.

But – with all due respect for the streaky Andre Iguodala and Leandro Barbosa, who has distributing responsibilities – the Warriors could use another spot-up outside shooter off the bench.

That’s why they signed Ian Clark.

It’s also why they’re signing Jarell Eddie.

Shams Charania of RealGM:

Eddie shot 37% on 3-pointers in four seasons in Virginia Tech, but he went undrafted last year. So, he went to the D-League and make 43% of his 3-pointers.

The Warriors have 13 players with guaranteed contracts plus James McAdoo ($100,000 guaranteed), Chris Babb (unguaranteed), Clark and Eddie. I doubt Clark or Eddie got much, if any, of a guarantee, though that’s still unclear. Facing the luxury tax, Golden State probably doesn’t want much dead money on the books. Though most teams use a partial guarantee, the Warriors can entice quality players in this free agent tier by offering the chance of a role on an excellent team with a good record of player development. That can pay off with more money down the road.

McAdoo’s guarantee gives him a leg up for making the regular-season roster. That leaves Eddie, Clark and Babb competing for one – maybe two if McAdoo falters – roster spot(s). That’s a lot of pressure on each shot during training camp and the preseason, but that’s what the Warriors want. If all goes well, they’ll be in more high-pressure situations about eight months later.

Brazil basketball team gets bid for 2016 Olympics


Two men’s basketball teams have now qualified for the 2016 Olympics.

The United States clinched a bid to Rio by winning the 2014 World Cup.

Brazil – which was in jeopardy of losing its bid over unreturned library books – received the berth typically given to the host nation.

FIBA release:

Brazil’s men’s and women’s national teams will compete in the Olympic Basketball Tournament at the 2016 Rio Games after FIBA’s Central Board decided to grant them automatic places at its meeting in Tokyo on Sunday.

The decision was made based on the Brazil Basketball Confederation (CBB)’s application which confirms they meet the various sporting requirements, including having a rich sporting history in basketball and being able to guarantee their best teams competing in Rio.

CBB, supported by its partners and the Brazil Olympic Committee (BOC), has made a firm commitment to pay the outstanding debt.

According to FIBA’s statutes, the Central Board holds the right to grant automatic qualification to the host country organising the Olympic Games.

This is obviously great news for Brazil. Nene, Tiago Splitter, Anderson Varejao, Leandro Barbosa, Lucas Nogueira and Bruno Caboclo can definitely compete for a medal.

It’s also great news for the other teams competing in the FIBA Americas Championship:

  • Canada
  • Argentina
  • Puerto Rico
  • Dominican Republic
  • Venezuela
  • Mexico
  • Panama
  • Cuba
  • Uruguay

The top two teams in that tournament, which begins Aug. 31, that haven’t already received an Olympic bid qualify for Rio. With Brazil gaining an Olympic berth now, that opens the door for another team in the FIBA Americas.

Brazil’s automatic basketball bid for 2016 Olympics in jeopardy over money

Tiago Splitter, Rudy Fernandez, Leandrinho Barbosa

Two spots in the 2016 Rio Olympics men’s basketball tournament are secure.

One spot in the 2016 Rio Olympics men’s basketball tournament is secure.

The United States is guaranteed entry by virtue of winning the 2014 World Cup.

Brazil was believed to be a lock as the host country, but that’s no longer so certain.

David Ebner Vancouver of The Globe and Mail:

Last month, FIBA, basketball’s international ruling body, set a deadline of July 31 for the Brazilian Basketball Federation to pay “significant outstanding dues” to FIBA “in order to be granted automatic qualification places for Rio 2016.”

FIBA did not explain what the unpaid dues were for, or exactly how much money was owed – estimates suggest it could be $1-million. That, of course, is a fraction of the $12-billion or so that Brazil’s organizing committee is spending to stage the Games.

Earlier this year, according to a FIBA spokesman, CBB proposed to repay the debt on a schedule extending to 2019. FIBA said no, and set the deadline. Its spokesman explained by e-mail: “A solution needs to be found by [July 31, 2015] so that all participating teams know the qualification process for the Olympic Games and the FIBA Olympic Qualifying Tournaments.”

Most likely, Brazil will just pay these dues. But if this matter remains unresolved, Brazil could potentially still qualify for the Olympics through other means.

Brazil is scheduled to compete in the FIBA Americas Championship next month, though perhaps FIBA would block Brazil’s inclusion based on these unpaid dues. The top two teams in the tournament qualify for the Olympics, and the U.S. – Olympic berth already clinched – isn’t competing. With several NBA players to draw upon – Nene, Tiago Splitter, Anderson Varejao, Leandro Barbosa, Lucas Nogueira and Bruno Caboclo  – Brazil would be a strong contender.

But if Brazil needs to use one of the FIBA Americas’ two qualifying slots, that closes a door for the other nine teams in the tournament:

  • Canada
  • Argentina
  • Puerto Rico
  • Dominican Republic
  • Venezuela
  • Mexico
  • Panama
  • Cuba
  • Uruguay

Safe to say, these other North and South American teams are rooting for Brazil to settle with FIBA.

Warriors could save $48 million with David Lee-Gerald Wallace trade

Golden State Warriors v Brooklyn Nets

The Warriors agreed to trade David Lee to the Celtics for Gerald Wallace.

The deal is essentially a salary dump for Golden State. Lee lost his starting job and most of his playing time. Wallace, who turns 33 this summer, looks done as a functional NBA player.

Just how much will the Warriors save?

It’s far more than the difference in salaries between Lee ($15,493,680) and Wallace ($10,105,855). That’s because Golden State projects to be far above the progressive luxury tax.

Let’s start with a few reasonable assumptions:

The Warriors could save even more if they stretch Wallace, which would spread his remaining salary evenly over twice the remaining years plus one (three).

On one hand, stretching Wallace makes sense for owners Peter Guber and Joe Lacob financially. Golden State is almost guaranteed to pay the tax next season, but with the salary cap and luxury-tax lines skyrocketing in coming years, it’s unlikely for the following seasons.

On the other hand, stretching Wallace wouldn’t give the Warriors any more immediate roster-building flexibility. Plus, that would close the opportunity to use his salary in a trade. If they stretch him, he’d also eat into their potential cap room in 2016 – when they reportedly plan to pursue Kevin Durant – and 2017.

Here’s Golden State’s outlook before the trade, after the trade and if they use the stretch provision on Wallace:


  • Salary: $104,896,878
  • Luxury tax: $52,113,291
  • Total: $157,010,169


  • Salary: $99,509,053
  • Luxury tax: $33,654,421
  • Total: $133,163,474

With stretch

  • Salary: $92,771,816
  • Luxury tax: $15,850,678
  • Total: $108,622,494

That’s a saving of about $24 million with the trade. By stretching Wallace, Golden State could increase those savings to about $48 million this season. (Wallace would still make $3,368,618 each of the next two seasons).

The luxury tax is determined on the last day of the regular season, so the Warriors still have a chance to adjust their payroll. But they positioned themselves today to save a lot of money.

Report: Warriors re-signing Leandro Barbosa with most of MLE

Golden State Warriors Travel Home

Leandro Barbosa and the Warriors was championship.

Now, Barbosa gonna be paid.

Ken Berger of CBSSports.com:

The Warriors could have used Barbosa’s Non-Bird Rights (technically a form of Bird Rights) to pay him up to $1,799,024. By paying more, they’ll have to dip into their mid-level exception.

The taxpayer mid-level exception is for $ 3,376,000. So, after Barbosa’s $2.5 million, that leaves just$ 876,000 of the MLE – less than the minimum salary for most players. That’s useful only if Golden State wants to offer a rookie or second-year player a contract for above the minimum and/or longer than two years.

In other words, don’t count on the Warriors signing a rotation player from another team. They already took care of their top priority by re-signing Draymond Green, and Barbosa – a solid backup guard – maintains depth. That’s plenty.

As last season showed, Golden State doesn’t need significant upgrades.