Tag: Lamar Odom

Los Angeles Clippers Jordan, Griffin, and Billups watch their team lose to Memphis Grizzlies during Game 5 of their NBA Western Conference Quarterfinals basketball playoff series in Los Angeles

Clippers lose Blake Griffin, then lose to Grizzlies in Game 5


Blake Griffin would have needed to be at full strength and then some if the Clippers were to have a shot at winning Game 5 and reversing the recent trends that the Grizzlies had established in the previous two games of the series in Memphis.

A high ankle sprain suffered by Griffin in practice on Monday limited both his effectiveness and his minutes, and without him, the Grizzlies were able to continue to impose their will in a 103-93 win that places the Clippers firmly on the brink of elimination.

Memphis can close out the series with a win at home on Friday.

Griffin didn’t look right to start the game, but he was extremely aggressive nonetheless. The results weren’t there, however, and the ankle injury was to blame. Clippers head coach Vinny Del Negro said afterward that it occurred during a drill where the players were going half-speed, and Griffin just happened to come down on the foot of Lamar Odom. Del Negro called it a “freak accident.”

Griffin played just 19 minutes and 34 seconds before the team ruled him out the rest of the way, and finished with four points, five rebounds, five assists, and two turnovers, while making just two of the seven shots he attempted.

Without Griffin defensively, Memphis continued to get what it wanted from Zach Randolph and Marc Gasol, who finished with 25 and 21 points, respectively. The Grizzlies also got a solid contribution from Tayshaun Prince, and Mike Conley was brilliant, just as he’s been for the season’s last couple of months.

Chris Paul tried to carry the load offensively for L.A., and finished with 35 points, six rebounds, and four assists. But no one else for the Clippers stepped up, and aside from Jamal Crawford dropping in 15 points off the bench, no other Clipper player finished in double figures.

The rest of the Clippers starters aside from Paul combined for just 18 points on 8-of-21 shooting.

Even with Griffin in the game in the first half, the Grizzlies were showing no signs of relenting from the style they were able to play at home the past two games. Their bigs were active on both ends of the floor, they continued to win the rebounding battle (although just barely, and without Griffin that’s an improvement for the Clippers), and they took care of the ball by committing only seven turnovers.

Unquestionably, the Clippers have a tall task before them. They’ll need to play a nearly perfect game to win on the Grizzlies’ home floor and stave off elimination, and even then, winning two straight at this point in the series with the way Memphis has found its rhythm would seem to be a longshot.

Without Blake Griffin, or with a severely limited version of him, that task begins to feel impossible.

Chris Paul’s game-winner at the buzzer sends Clippers to Memphis with a 2-0 series lead

Los Angeles Clippers Chris Paul scores the game-winning basket against the Memphis Grizzlies in Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES — The Grizzlies may have given their best shot to the Clippers in Monday’s Game 2, correcting virtually all of the mistakes they made in the first game of the series.

Thanks to the buzzer-beating heroics of Chris Paul, however, everything Memphis had wasn’t good enough.

L.A. pulled out the thrilling 93-91 victory to give the Clippers a 2-0 lead in the best-of-seven first round series, and it’s difficult to see where the Grizzlies go from here.

Memphis got destroyed on the boards in Game 1, but managed to stay within two rebounds of L.A. in this one. The Grizzlies nearly matched the Clippers on the offensive glass, and outscored them in second chance points 15-11 after getting demolished in that category by 20 on Saturday.

For most of this game, the starting unit for the Grizzlies outplayed the starters for the Clippers. Memphis got off to strong starts in the first quarter and the third, and rallied late when the lineups for both teams largely featured the guys who play the most minutes. But the depth of the Clippers made all the difference.

Jamal Crawford got things started in the second quarter by splashing home an array of extremely difficult shots. Crawford had 10 in the period to help his team open up an eight point lead, and most wondered if the news earlier in the day that J.R. Smith was named the Sixth Man of the Year instead of Crawford might have had something to with that.

“Honestly, it’s more about winning than anything,” Crawford said. “I know a lot of people say, you know, go out there and prove why you should have been this or that, but you kind of feel like you’ve been proving it all season. So it’s not about that.”

Once the starters were back to start the third, Memphis made its run, and after falling behind by seven put together a 10-2 stretch to claim the lead, before the Clippers stabilized to take a four-point advantage into the final period.

L.A.’s bench went on a tear to start the fourth, thanks to key plays from Eric Bledsoe, Matt Barnes, and Lamar Odom that pushed the lead to 12 with barely two minutes gone. But the run came much earlier than in Game 1, and with the improved aggressiveness and execution offensively that the Grizzlies had displayed for much of the night, it didn’t feel like it would hold the way it did last time.

Memphis regained momentum once the Clippers reserves had been left in a little too long. There were some wild offensive adventures from L.A. that resulted in turnovers or poor shot selection that allowed the Grizzlies to quickly get it back down to seven, before putting together a 13-6 run to tie it at 89, on the strength of some big shots from Conley and backup big man Darrell Arthur, who was getting some rare crunch time minutes.

“Well, [Zach Randolph] had five fouls and they were playing small so there was no use trying to go back big,” Lionel Hollins said of his decision to go with Arthur afterward. “They were playing a lot of pick and roll and Darrell did a nice job and made some nice plays.”

After Paul and Marc Gasol traded buckets, the game was tied again at 91 with 13 seconds left and the Clippers holding possession. Paul got the ball at the top of the three-point arc, isolated against the best defender the Grizzlies have in Tony Allen. Paul drove right, created some space, and got the incredible game-winning shot to bank home as time expired.

“We got the ball in, and what we tried to do was get Mike Conley to switch on me,” Paul explained. “So that’s why I screened for Jamal, because obviously Tony’s their best defender. They switched for a second, and Jamal threw it back to me and Tony came back to me, and played as good a defense as you could have. I looked up at the clock and thought to myself, I better get a shot off. So I just tried to attack and luckily I made the shot.”

It was a fantastic ending to what was the best game of these young playoffs so far.

“This game was tough,” Conley said. “We thought we played as good of a game as we could.”

In a series that many expected to go six or seven games, the Clippers might have shown in Game 2 that the best effort the Grizzlies can muster may not be enough to make it last that long.

Grizzlies need to control the boards, increase the pace to bounce back in Game 2 against Clippers

Memphis Grizzlies v Los Angeles Clippers - Game One

LOS ANGELES — After the Clippers took Game 1 from the Grizzlies by dominating the glass, that was the area that Memphis seemed most focused on improving for the next game of the series and beyond.

Being on the wrong end of a 47-23 rebounding margin will do that.

But it wasn’t the big men of the Clippers who were necessarily doing the damage. While they did a good job putting a body on Marc Gasol and Zach Randolph that helped limit them to just six rebounds in total, it was the guards and wings, especially off the Clippers’ bench, that were creating the most problems.

“They’re athletic, man,” Mike Conley said of the way the Clippers were able to crash the boards after Game 1. “They’ve got two and there guys going to the glass every time, jumping over us and just using their athleticism. We’ve got to do a better job of checking them, our guards have to do a better job of coming back to rebound and helping our bigs. If we can win the rebound battle, we have a chance to win.”

Gasol said the same thing about winning the rebounding battle, and given the fact that the Grizzlies were second in the league in rebounding rate during the regular season, it’s expected that they’ll do a better job in cleaning up that mess in time for Game 2.

Closing the gap on the boards will definitely help the Grizzlies’ cause, but that alone won’t be enough. They’ll need to manufacture offense consistently throughout the course of the game, and can’t afford to go several minutes without scoring. Despite the rebounding disadvantage, Memphis was within one point of the Clippers with just over 10 minutes left in Game 1, before L.A. put together a 15-2 run to seal it.

Believe it or not, Memphis actually got the pace it wanted in Game 1, at least defensively. It was just an 85 possession game, though the Clippers’ efficiency ended up coming in at a blistering 129.3 points per 100 possessions.

Offensively, though, it would help if Memphis could speed things up, and get into the team’s sets a little sooner to exploit the Clippers’ defense for easier opportunities. Grizzlies head coach Lionel Hollins explained before Game 1 why he believes playing faster would be beneficial to his team’s offense.

“Everybody thinks we want to play at a slow pace,” he said. “We don’t. What I’d like to see us do better is rebound the ball, and then run off misses. But we don’t do that as often as we should. We have done it in the past, and we’ve done it in certain games, but it’s just a mindset of going out and doing it. We need our big people to run, we need our wings to run, we need our point guard to push the ball.

“I think they’re confident in playing the way they play but I’d rather play a little bit quicker,” Hollins continued. “I’m not talking about running up the court and taking the first three-pointer; that’s not what I mean at all. I mean, just get over half court [with 20 seconds still left on the shot clock], and explore it from there.”

On the Clippers’ side, they’ll need to continue to get production off the bench, but the Game 1 numbers don’t tell the entire story. Lamar Odom, for example, finished with seven rebounds and three assists in 18 minutes, but was just 1-7 from the field and largely brutal for stretches on both ends of the floor.

Eric Bledsoe finished 7-7 from the field, but four of those shots and eight of his 13 fourth quarter points came in the game’s final five minutes, with the Clippers already up double digits and the game having already been decided.

To bounce back in Game 2, the Grizzlies will need to shore up the problems in the rebounding category, avoid any long scoring droughts, and limit the impact of the Clippers’ reserves. Do all of that, and the series will be tied at a game apiece heading back to Memphis.

Seven players whose teams need them to step up big in the postseason

New York Knicks v Boston Celtics

Jeff Green

Since his 43-point game in mid-March (excluding Boston’s season finale, when regular players rested), Green has averaged 20.0, 5.7 rebounds and 2.9 assists per game. By any eye test, he’s looked excellent. But in that span, the Celtics have been outscored by 3.6 points per 100 possession with him on the court and outscored opponents by 12.5 points per with him on the bench. Green has suffered from playing major minutes with the Celtics’ reserves, and when he’s played with the starters, he’s posted positive net ratings. Once Boston shrinks its playoff rotation, Green should turn into a player who excels individually and helps his team become more successful.

Tayshaun Prince

Prince, once a bastion of durability, just played his first 82-game season since playing every game between the 2003-04 and 2008-09 season. The 2008-09 season was also the last time Prince made the playoffs. In a four-game sweep to LeBron James’ Cavaliers, Prince looked worn down, scoring 15 total points on 27 shots. He’s probably more rejuvenated with Memphis, but he’ll need to show he’s not too old for a long playoff run.

Jerryd Bayless

Bayless has given the Grizzlies a nice scoring punch off the bench, leading the team’s reserves with 8.7 points per game. But he also makes Mike Conley better, allowing Conley a break from full-time ball-handling duties while keeping the starting point guard on the court and contributing as a scorer. In the 64 contest the combination has been used, Bayless and Conley play 10 minutes per game together and help the Grizzlies outscore  opponents by 10.2 possessions per 100 possessions. As long as Bayless plays well, that makes managing a think backcourt much easier easier.

DeAndre Jordan

Last season, Jordan’s playing time shrunk from 27.2 minutes per game in the regular season to 21.6 minutes per game in a playoff series with the Grizzlies. Now that that Jordan is down to 24.5 minutes per game in the regular season, how much less can can he play against Memphis this year? Los Angeles had Reggie Evans and Kenyon Martin last season to battle Marc Gasol inside, but can the Clippers rely on Lamar Odom this year? If Jordan proves he can make his free throws and remain engaged, he’ll stay on the court and they won’t have to answer that question.

Jeremy Lin

In Houston’s two losses to the Thunder, Lin scored 13 points on 6-of-15 shooting. In the Rockets’ win, he scored 29 points on 12-of-22 shooting. James Harden can’t carry the scoring load alone, and Lin is the wildcard who could help him – or get shut down by Oklahoma City’s impressive defensive backcourt.

Steve Nash

Nash’s numbers are down – his win shares and win shares per 48 minutes are both his lowest in the last 13 years – partially because the Lakers’ Kobe-centric system kept the ball out of his hands. But at 39 years old, Nash is no longer close to the same player he was just two years ago. With Kobe out, the Lakers have little choice but to empower Nash to run the offense. Does he have enough left in the tank to lead one more playoff run? I doubt it, but that’s probably their only hope of advancing.

J.R. Smith

The Knicks started the season 23-10 and ended with a 16-2 stretch. Between, they went 15-16. Smith was effective during both New York’s high periods and its low period, and that illustrates the excellent season he’s having. But Smith was definitely better during the highs (shooting 45 percent) than the low (shooting 36 percent). Few players can match Smith’s talent, and when he’s using all of it, the Knicks are so much better. There risk of Smith flaming out in the playoffs is lower than most could have envisioned, but that doesn’t change how much better he can make the Knicks when he play his best.

Clippers keep dream of three seed alive with easy win over Blazers

Portland Trail Blazers v Los Angeles Clippers

In the last couple weeks the Clippers have hit a playoff stride — they had won five games in a row coming into Tuesday night and they were motivated because they still had playoff seeding to play for. On the other side the Trail Blazers had lost 11 in a row and have looked like a team going through the motions the past couple weeks.

Knowing that, this game went pretty much as you’d expect.

Blake Griffin had nine first quarter points on his way to 16, the Clippers blew the game open with a 21-3 run in the second quarter and cruised in with a 93-77 victory. Chris Paul did his usual thing and led the team with 11 assists.

What the win means is the Clippers head into the last game of the season with hopes of the three seed and home court in the first round still alive. To get the three seed the Clippers need to beat the Kings in Sacramento Wednesday, plus they need the Nuggets to lose at home to the Suns. The second part of that is not likely.

Still the Clippers need a win on Wednesday — a victory gives them home court in the first round of the playoffs if they face Memphis. If the Clippers lose and the Grizzlies beat the Jazz, the Grizzlies have home court in that series.

Wednesday’s game is not going to go as smoothly as Tuesday’s did for the Clippers. Few games over the course of a season do.

The Clippers never trailed but, as mentioned above, dominated the second quarter 26-13 and that’s when the game became a rout. In case the Trail Blazers had any dreams of a comeback in the third quarter Caron Butler came out and scored 18 of the Clippers 28 in the quarter to put an end to that. Butler finished the game with 22 points.

Los Angeles got another big night from a Tribe Called Bench — Ryan Hollins and Lamar Odom came in and gave them 12 points and 16 rebounds. Jamal Crawford added 9 points.

It was a business-like win for the Clippers on a night they needed a win. One more and they carry a seven-game winning streak into the playoffs — and they will have home court advantage.