Tag: Lamar Odom

O.J. Mayo, Dwight Howard

Report: 100 percent chance Mavericks won’t keep No. 13 pick


The Mavericks have made no secret about wanting to prevent the No. 13 pick from cutting into their cap room, whether that means trading the pick or drafting and stashing a player.

The idea of wasting a lottery pick, either by dumping it in an uneven trade or using it on a lesser prospect just because he agreed to defer the start of his guaranteed rookie rookie contract, seems less-than-wise at face value, but if it helps land Dwight Howard and/or Chris Paul, it’s genius.

According to Eddie Sefko of The Dallas Morning News, the Mavericks aren’t hedging their bets. They’re going all-in with using cap space rather than the draft to upgrade their team.

One source put the chances of the Mavericks having the 13th overall draft pick on their opening-day roster next season at 0 percent.

There is an 80-percent chance that the pick is traded before or, more likely, during the draft, the source said. There is at least a 15-percent chance that the pick is a foreign player who is under contract and can be left overseas for a year and not count against the Mavericks’ salary cap.

There is less than a 5 percent chance that one of the top five or six players in the draft slips to No. 13 and the Mavericks take him, knowing fully that they can jettison that valuable chip easily for future considerations.

Why is the source so certain? Perhaps, Dallas already agreed to trade the pick. Because the Mavericks traded a future first-round pick for Lamar Odom that might be transferred in 2014, they can’t trade their 2013 pick before the draft. But they can agree to trade it beforehand, select a player on behalf of another team and then make the trade official after the fact.

Or maybe Dallas has already promised a player who agreed to remain overseas for a year.

As far as the five percent chance of a top prospect drafting, a pre-arranged trade or promise could always be contingent on certain players not being available.

This could be a source overstating something that is probable but not a sure thing, or the source could know with as much certainty as he or she states because it’s already a done deal.

Blake Griffin day-to-day with ankle sprain; Chris Paul has bruised thumb but will play Game 6

Blake Griffin

Containing Zach Randolph proved a problem for a fully healthy Blake Griffin, Z-Bo dominated that match-up in games 3 and 4.

Then in a practice before Game 5 Griffin jumped and came down on the foot of Lamar Odom, twisting and spraining Griffin’s ankle. He tried to give it a go in Game 5 but after a decent start you could see the pain growing, and by the third quarter he had to step out. Randolph scored 25 points and had 11 rebounds (five on the offensive glass) in the Memphis win (Memphis leads the series 3-2).

The Clippers might be without Griffin again.

X-Rays confirmed a high ankle sprain for Griffin and he is officially day-to-day, reports Arash Markazi of ESPNLosAngeles.com. Other word out of the Clippers’ locker room is  there is a lot of swelling (we’re talking an ankle the size of a grapefruit) and even if Griffin can go in a do-or-die Game 6 for Los Angeles on Friday night he will not be the same player.

Chris Paul will play in Game 6 but he has a bruised left thumb, Markazi reports. Paul had 35 points for the Clippers on Tuesday and played his usual strong game, but he didn’t get a lot of help. Los Angeles can’t afford anything less than the

Vinny Del Negro has been accused of being slow making adjustments in this series. That is true, but it’s also a matter of DeAndre Jordan not executing and Blake Griffin not physically able to execute (due to his ankle) any plans that might exist to slow the bruising Memphis front line of Randolph and Marc Gasol.

Del Negro called out Jordan for his play, and came off as a frustrated and nervous coach. And he should be if the Clips get bounced in the first round.

Clippers lose Blake Griffin, then lose to Grizzlies in Game 5

Los Angeles Clippers Jordan, Griffin, and Billups watch their team lose to Memphis Grizzlies during Game 5 of their NBA Western Conference Quarterfinals basketball playoff series in Los Angeles

Blake Griffin would have needed to be at full strength and then some if the Clippers were to have a shot at winning Game 5 and reversing the recent trends that the Grizzlies had established in the previous two games of the series in Memphis.

A high ankle sprain suffered by Griffin in practice on Monday limited both his effectiveness and his minutes, and without him, the Grizzlies were able to continue to impose their will in a 103-93 win that places the Clippers firmly on the brink of elimination.

Memphis can close out the series with a win at home on Friday.

Griffin didn’t look right to start the game, but he was extremely aggressive nonetheless. The results weren’t there, however, and the ankle injury was to blame. Clippers head coach Vinny Del Negro said afterward that it occurred during a drill where the players were going half-speed, and Griffin just happened to come down on the foot of Lamar Odom. Del Negro called it a “freak accident.”

Griffin played just 19 minutes and 34 seconds before the team ruled him out the rest of the way, and finished with four points, five rebounds, five assists, and two turnovers, while making just two of the seven shots he attempted.

Without Griffin defensively, Memphis continued to get what it wanted from Zach Randolph and Marc Gasol, who finished with 25 and 21 points, respectively. The Grizzlies also got a solid contribution from Tayshaun Prince, and Mike Conley was brilliant, just as he’s been for the season’s last couple of months.

Chris Paul tried to carry the load offensively for L.A., and finished with 35 points, six rebounds, and four assists. But no one else for the Clippers stepped up, and aside from Jamal Crawford dropping in 15 points off the bench, no other Clipper player finished in double figures.

The rest of the Clippers starters aside from Paul combined for just 18 points on 8-of-21 shooting.

Even with Griffin in the game in the first half, the Grizzlies were showing no signs of relenting from the style they were able to play at home the past two games. Their bigs were active on both ends of the floor, they continued to win the rebounding battle (although just barely, and without Griffin that’s an improvement for the Clippers), and they took care of the ball by committing only seven turnovers.

Unquestionably, the Clippers have a tall task before them. They’ll need to play a nearly perfect game to win on the Grizzlies’ home floor and stave off elimination, and even then, winning two straight at this point in the series with the way Memphis has found its rhythm would seem to be a longshot.

Without Blake Griffin, or with a severely limited version of him, that task begins to feel impossible.