Tag: Lamar Odom

Los Angeles Clippers v Miami Heat

Clippers want Lamar Odom to be more of a scorer


Lamar Odom has always been a maddening puzzle for fans of the teams he’s played for over the years to try and figure out. He seemingly has all the tools to be a dominant player on both ends of the floor, yet has only shows it in flashes throughout his NBA career that is now in its 14th season.

Odom is more of a solid all-around talent than he is a pure scorer, and a lot of that has been due to the role required of him in order for his teams to be most successful.

He averaged 14.4 points per game while winning Sixth Man of the Year honors with the Lakers in 2011, but this season in Los Angeles with the Clippers, he’s averaging just 3.8 points per game while playing 20.5 minutes per game off the bench.

His teammates have been encouraging him to pick it up, and his head coach has talked to him about it, as well.

From Brad Turner of the Los Angeles Times:

His Clippers teammates encourage Odom to be more aggressive on offense. Fans, the media and his critics want Odom to stop being so passive on offense.

But Coach Vinny Del Negro said he doesn’t really have an issue with Odom’s lack of offense because his versatile forward supplies so much more.

“I’ve talked to Lamar about that,” Del Negro said. “He understands that. Lamar has to pick his spots out there where he’s comfortable at. He’s doing a good job in a lot of areas for us. But when he’s open, he’s got to make shots for us and make plays off the dribble and get to the rim.”

Increased scoring from Odom would be nice, but the reality is that the Clippers have one of the deepest benches in the league, including the leading candidate to win Sixth Man of the Year this season, Jamal Crawford, who has no trouble lighting it up on a nightly basis.

It’s more about being aggressive when the opportunities arise than it is purely about increasing points per game for Odom; any team’s offense runs more smoothly when players take good open shots rather than passing them up.

It’s worth noting that Odom is an excellent ball handler, especially for his size. So if he can get to the rim off the dribble more often and distribute to his teammates rather than scoring himself, that would be as much of a help to L.A.’s bench unit as would an increase in his personal production.

Blake Griffin throws down the alley-oop against the Knicks (VIDEO)

Blake Griffin

The Clippers had it working from the very beginning during their win over the Knicks on Sunday, and Blake Griffin helped get things going with this highlight slam off of the perfect alley-oop pass from Lamar Odom.

The curious part about this is that Tyson Chandler, a strong defender who’s made a career on the offensive end of the floor being on the receiving end of plays exactly like this one, didn’t see it coming.



The Extra Pass: The Eric Bledsoe Predicament

Eric Bledsoe Clippers

Los Angeles Clippers guard Eric Bledsoe is one great big problem.

He’s a problem for opponents who have to bring the ball up against him. He’s a problem for big men that think they’ll safely collect rebounds. He’s a problem for the backpedaling guard in transition that has to stay in front of him.

He’s a problem for his coach. He’s better suited to play shooting guard, but he’s 6-foot-1 and shoots a set-shot. So he’s a point guard, but not really. But he’s fast. Too fast. 

Bledsoe is such a problem that now he’s a problem for the entire organization. The secret is out, and other teams want Bledsoe to be their problem.

And here’s where it gets tricky for the Clippers. Head coach Vinny Del Negro views Eric Bledsoe as a point guard, and playing behind the league’s best point guard, he is a backup and little more. To wit, Bledsoe and Paul have played a measly 138 minutes together on the season. For comparison sake, Paul has played 588 minutes next to uninspiring wingman Willie Green.

That’s a problem. The Clippers aren’t maximizing Bledsoe’s value — they’re just using him as one heck of an insurance policy. With Chris Paul in a suit on the sidelines, that looks smart. With Chris Paul being an unrestricted free agent this offseason and not committed long-term, it looks even smarter. Sure, Paul has every reason to stay — more money, winning team, big market — but until it’s on paper, the Clippers can’t build off assumptions.

That’s really the heart of the issue surrounding the trade rumors for Bledsoe. He’s worth more as a player to other teams, but he’s worth more as an asset to the Clippers. Bledsoe is simultaneously the backup plan and the future in that he’s the most desirable, cheapest and realistic trade asset on the team by a large margin.

Pushing all-in for a Kevin Garnett is enticing, but KG isn’t a more valuable asset to the Clippers than Bledsoe is. Don’t get that confused. Garnett is the better player even at 36-years-old, and I’m incredibly comfortable saying a deal involving Butler and Bledsoe for Garnett would make the Clippers better, maybe even so much so that it would vault them to a championship. But moving Bledsoe for a guy on the other side of the hill could also shorten the window to win that championship dramatically and perhaps unnecessarily.

There’s a flip side to that, though. Paul is desperate for a championship and wants to win now more than anything else, and Del Negro is on a one-year deal and hunting for a long-term contract. Chris Paul barely plays with Bledsoe — you don’t think he’d rather have a big man setting the world’s dirtiest screens to free him up instead? You don’t think Del Negro would feel more confident with his coaching career in the hands of one of the greatest defensive players and floor spacers the game has ever seen rather than Lamar Odom and DeAndre Jordan? Moving  Bledsoe doesn’t seem so bad if your length of vision matches the length of your contract.

Still, trading Bledsoe for another veteran assumes an awful lot of risk moving forward outside of Paul’s impending decision. Chauncey Billups, Grant Hill, Lamar Odom, Caron Butler, Matt Barnes — spring chickens they are not. At some point, you have to look at the roster Paul would be coming back to and make sure it’s one that can succeed long-term. Bledsoe is essentially acting as money in the Clippers’ saving account. He’s there for an emergency, but he’s also there to buy a bigger future asset the Clippers would have limited means to acquire otherwise.

This year’s trade deadline doesn’t have to be a boom or bust situation for the Clippers. Bledsoe will still be under contract next year, and it’s hard to imagine he won’t continue to improve. The market for his services is only going to grow.

And really, aren’t the Clippers a legitimate title contender already? This is a team that went an entire month without a loss when they were near full-strength. Adding an aging veteran with title experience that’s already on the roster (Billups) to that group instead of forfeiting current and future contributors for an outside guy is certainly safer, and it’s probably a little smarter, too.

The Extra Pass: How the Clippers Grew Up

Los Angeles Clippers' Paul puts his arm around teammate Griffin during NBA basketball game against the Memphis Grizzlies in Los Angeles

The Extra Pass is a new daily column that’s designed to give you a better look at a theme, team, player or scheme. Today, we look at the maturation of the Los Angeles Clippers.

For years and years, the Los Angeles Clippers were a failure on a systemic level. The on-court talent was faced with the permanent uphill battle of overcoming the ineptness of the franchise’s negligent caretaker and owner, Donald Sterling.

Very rarely did the whole overcoming thing actually happen. It happened so infrequently, actually, that calling the Clippers the worst franchise in professional sports wasn’t mud slinging, but rather an accurate moniker.

When the Clippers acquired Chris Paul last year, he understood the gravity of his decision to adopt the abused franchise as his own. Being great on the court simply wouldn’t be enough — he would have to be the new caretaker, the franchise’s new parent. After all, Sterling sure as hell wasn’t doing it, and for as great as Blake Griffin was, he was still just a kid trying to figure out his own game. The responsibility was squarely on Paul’s shoulders.

Like most new parents, Paul accepted that responsibility with a type of fervor that could be considered, at times, a little overbearing. The Clippers were now an extension of Paul, so everything was watched and controlled with an overly careful eye that only a great point guard can possess.

During their inaugural season together, the Clippers would often stumble through three quarters to teams with less talent, only to hope, or know, that Paul would bail them out in the last few minutes. And more often than not, Paul would play the role of both hero and enabler and come through.

The Clippers had managed to become a very good team throughout that process, but all their hopes stayed completely dependent on Paul’s performance. The rest of the team was generally incapable of any real success without Paul holding their hand, and in some ways, Paul was at least partially responsible for allowing the team to establish such a heavy dependence on his late game offensive heroics.

The playoff sweep at the hands of the Spurs was a reflection of this. With Paul banged up and limited by a defense hellbent on stopping him, the Clippers had little else to fall back on in terms of both experience and scheme. While they had ultimately changed for the better with Paul as a parent during that first season, the Clippers as a whole still had yet to mature.

With the guidance of Paul, the Clippers went into the offseason looking to speed up that maturation process. Their youngest substantial free agent signing was 32-year-old Jamal Crawford. They brought in traveled players like Grant Hill, Lamar Odom and Matt Barnes, and secured Chauncey Billups as the first act of business.

Those signings obviously matured the team on paper, but it was Paul who did the actual advancing. Instead of conserving energy for when his heroics would be needed in the fourth quarter like the prior season, Paul changed his approach this year by using his energy right away so the team wouldn’t need him at all — a real “teach a man to fish” move.

Behind Paul’s inspired first quarter play, the Clippers have had a much improved defense (18th in defensive efficiency last year to 4th this season), thanks to the example he’s established. If you flip to a telecast of a Clippers game in the fourth quarter this year, there’s a decent chance Paul will be seated on the bench, watching a suffocating second unit put the bow on another blowout win because Paul did his damage so early.

Playing that hard defensively early on accomplished a few different things for the Clippers. It made them the league’s most dominant defense against opposing point guards, something they can really hang their hat on. It sent the message that he trusted the depth behind him. It emphasized the importance of no player taking possessions off. The Clippers aren’t accomplishing what they are defensively with a scheme like Chicago’s or Boston’s — it’s almost all driven by effort.

A test for the Clippers’ progress defensively came about rather recently when they traveled to Memphis for another game in a long line of slugfests. This time, however, they’d be without their biggest puncher in Paul, who was sidelined with a knee injury.

How did they respond? Well, the Clippers held the Grizzlies to 30 percent shooting and destroyed them in their own house, 99-73. True to form, the game was essentially over in the third quarter.

On the very next night, the Clippers headed to Houston. All the excuses were readily available — they were on a back-to-back, on the road, without Chris Paul, against the league’s fastest team. But they won big again, going up by as much as 20 early in the fourth quarter before cruising the rest of the way.

An interesting narrative popped up after the impressive victories. How could Chris Paul be considered a real MVP candidate if his team was great — maybe even better — without him in the lineup for a few games? It’s a direct hit to the “valuable” part of the equation, isn’t it?

When considering that, I can’t help but be reminded of the conclusion of J.D. Salinger’s “The Catcher In The Rye.” The “little brother” of Los Angeles is reaching for that ring, and while Paul is still responsible for the Clippers, he’s mature enough to know that his teammates won’t learn anything if he does everything himself. He’s mature enough to know that repeatedly gearing up and saving them in the moment last year didn’t actually save the Clippers from anything at all.

It’s true, the Clippers don’t need Chris Paul in every waking moment anymore. It’s clear that they’ve grown out of that.

And if that’s not a reflection on Paul’s value, I don’t know what it is.

Magic snap Clippers’ 13-game home winning streak

Grant Hill, Josh McRoberts

The Orlando Magic are just 13-23 on the season, but they have some surprising signature wins that give the fan base hope as the team rebuilds without a superstar on the roster, and with a first-year head coach running the show.

Saturday afternoon’s come-from-behind 104-101 win over a Clippers team that held a share of the league’s best record coming in was yet another one to add to the resume, as Orlando, losers of 10 straight, held L.A. to just 18 fourth-quarter points while making its way back to secure the victory.

What was most interesting about the Clippers fourth quarter meltdown was the lineup they used in order to make sure they left the door open wide enough for the Magic to have a shot.

Three of L.A.’s five starters are DeAndre Jordan, Caron Butler, and Willie Green. Yet none were to be found in the final period of this one, with Vinny Del Negro instead opting for Jamal Crawford, Lamar Odom, and Matt Barnes, all of which played the entire fourth quarter.

Grant Hill made his season debut for the Clips in this one, and Del Negro in his infinite wisdom felt that the first six and a half minutes of the fourth quarter was the perfect time for that to happen. Hill finished 0-for-3 from the field with two points and two rebounds during this limited action, but L.A. found themselves ahead by just seven when he subbed out for Blake Griffin with five and a half minutes remaining.

J.J. Redick’s three-pointer with 42 seconds remaining broke a 99-all tie, and gave the Magic a lead they would never relinquish. Redick was 4-of-6 from the field in the fourth for 10 of his 21 points, and Arron Afflalo had eight in the final frame to bring his total for the game to 30 points, to go along with seven assists.

The Clippers wasted brilliant performances from Griffin, who finished with 30 points, eight rebounds, and seven assists, and Chris Paul, who didn’t shoot the ball terribly well but finished with 16 assists. Crawford’s offense wasn’t there off the bench, and he finished just 4-of-12 from the field with 13 points.

“This was a bad loss,” Griffin said afterward, according to the Associated Press. “We have to get back to what made us successful and what got us here. That was our defensive intensity and everybody contributing and everybody having a fire out there.”

“An embarrassing performance for us,” Clippers coach Vinny Del Negro said. “We got what we deserved.”

Del Negro’s coaching has always been the big question mark in terms of how far this Clippers team is able to go this season. We may have gotten our first glimpse of how he may negatively affect the team’s chances in this Saturday afternoon loss to the Magic.