Tag: Lakers Thunder

Los Angeles Lakers v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game One

Lakers-Thunder Game 1: Lakers suffer a Thundertality


This was a beating. A smackdown. A trouncing. A demolition. A boat race. A blowout. A “hit ’em in the head with a shovel and drag their team to an unmarked grave,” “nail ’em with a 2X4, watch them stagger around and then slam the door on them on the way out,” downright unavoidable-to-say butt kicking. The Thunder destroyed the Lakers 119-90 Monday to win Game 1 of their Western Conference Semifinals series.

The Thunder scored 39 points in the third quarter to bust the lead open. It was a 30-point lead late in the quarter, the starters didn’t play the fourth, Devin Ebanks was ejected in garbage time, and the Lakers essentially embarrassed themselves every way possible.

Some numbers, just for fun.

The Thunder finished with a 132 offensive efficiency. In the third quarter, they had a 161 offensive efficiency. They started the third with a 22-6 run. In six minutes. In six minutes, the Thunder scored 22 points, the Lakers just six. Kevin Durant had 10 points in that span, all with Metta World Peace on the floor.


So for the Thunder, the only thing you can really say is “do that more.” They played nearly perfectly, holding Kobe Bryant to 20 points on 18 shots, Paul Gasol to 10 points on 11 shots, and Ramon Sessions to just 2 points. They dominated every area of the game, played their way and hit absolutely everything they put up. This is not rocket science. Play that way, all the time, and you win a title.

For the Lakers?

OK, some caveats. The Lakers are two days removed from a Game 7 which is a physically and emotionally draining experience. They were on the road against a rested and ready OKC team who have young legs and are able to get up emotionally for Game 1s. The Thunder nailed everything in sight and the Lakers were just a step behind. It’s just one game. The Lakers can recover, respond, and tie the series on Wednesday. Losing by this much doesn’t have influence on the start of Game 2. It’ll be 0-0.

That said…

A message was sent.

The Thunder ran them out the building, and no one responded. There was no fight, no charge, no big move or surge. They didn’t even trim the lead in half to make a point going into Game 2. They just wilted. The Lakers are supposed to be a better defensive team, but they were crushed by the Thunder’s three-headed monster. Everything went wrong at once for the Lakers, and they do not appear to be aware that they are facing a team that finished with more wins, including two over them in dominant fashion this season. They do not appear to recognize that the Thunder are not kids who they can take lightly. This team is dangerous and has matchup advantages over the Lakers.

If the Lakers are going to win this series, if they’re going to win a game, everything has to change.

Bynum thinks Lakers will win title if they focus on defense

Denver Nuggets v Los Angeles Lakers - Game Seven

There is very little Lakers fans can take away from Los Angeles’ seven-game series win over Denver that should make them think they have much of a shot against Oklahoma City.

Everything Denver did to the Lakers in transition OKC can do as well and with better athletes.

But Andrew Bynum thinks there is a chance. Here is what he told Kevin Ding of the Orange County Register.

Bynum vowed to stay focused on defense first, seeing at least four blocks each game from him as a key to advancing now and later….

“We’ll win this championship,” Bynum said, “if we commit to defense.”

First off, instead of “we” Bynum needed to say “I.” While the Lakers as a whole had some off defensive games against Denver that started with Bynum, particularly in transition defense where Denver big men — we’re looking at you, Kenneth Faried — just ran down the court faster than Bynum and got good looks because of it. We’ll get into the games where Bynum didn’t bother with defensive rotations in the half court another time (he was hit and miss in the series and Ty Lawson was the beneficiary).

The Lakers problem is that while OKC is right there with Denver in transition (the Nuggets shot 63 percent in transition last season, the Thunder 60.7 percent, according to MySynergySports.com) the Thunder are far better in the half court if the Lakers do slow it down. Oh, and the Thunder are a better defensive team, also. Los Angeles cannot take a game off and still win this series.

But Bynum is right in the sense that if the Lakers don’t focus and play better defense they don’t stand any chance in this series. He can worry about winning a ring after that.

It’s not always about Kobe, Lakers defense keys win over Thunder

Kobe Bryant, Thabo Sefolosha

The end of the Lakers win over Oklahoma City was the latest Rorschach test for whether or not you think Kobe Bryant is a clutch player.

Kobe scored seven of the Lakers final 10 points (all the others were Pau Gasol free throws) and he pushed the Lakers to a 90-87 win on the road. But he shot just 2-of-6 late in the game, had a key turnover and took over the Laker offense as they abandoned the triangle for a lot of Kobe trying to do it all.

So is Kobe clutch? That misses the point.

The Lakers beat the Thunder again because they cranked up the defense and held the Thunder to 31 points in the second half. Total. The Thunder shot 44.7 percent for the game.

That’s really what it all about for the Lakers. Whether they run the triangle and Pau Gasol is hitting cutters with passes out of the high post, or if Kobe is just going rogue and launching contested bombs, the Lakers are going to score.

The question is are they focused enough to stop you from scoring? They looked old and tired at the end of their Grammy road trip, but since getting a few days off All-Star weekend to rest their old legs the Lakers are 4-0. And defending well.

This game really tells us little about what would happen if these two teams hook up again in the playoffs because we don’t know what the Thunder will look like with Kendrick Perkins in the paint. He will certainly make life harder for Andrew Bynum and Pau Gasol, the Lakers bigs will dominate the game as they tend to against when these teams meet up.

But will that matter if the Lakers can hold Kevin Durant to 21 points on 8-of-20 shooting? That is why you see Russell Westbrook try to take over more against the Lakers, because L.A. is one of the few teams that can make it very hard on Durant (and you see him miss good looks at game winners). And until the Thunder can do something about that this series will continue to be dominated by the Lakers.

NBA Playoffs, Lakers Jazz: As if the Jazz don't have enough problems, Kobe is back

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nba_bryant2_250.jpgAt one point in the first round, Kobe Bryant was showing all the leaping ability of Ron Artest. You could hardly tell them apart… well, except for the hair. And the build. And the fluidity of motion. Okay, so it wasn’t that bad.

But it wasn’t good either. Oklahoma City was blanketing him with very good defenders like Thabo Sefolosha and Kevin Durant — they deserve a lot of credit for making his life difficult. But Kobe was not his explosive self. He is the master of creating his own space then elevating for a jumper where he gets a good look. But the elevator was not going all the way to the top.

It is now. He has 61 points in two games against Utah, and that is with him largely deferring to the Lakers huge matchup advantage in the post.

Through the magic of MySynergySports I rewatched all of Kobe’s shot attempts from the first two games, as well as games three and four of the first round, and this is a different Kobe. He has said as much, as reported in the Orange County Register.

Bryant said of the Lakers’ two losses in Oklahoma City: “Played on one leg, basically.”

It’s just a matter of the explosion of the moves. Kobe in this series is moving with a real aggressiveness, a purpose, he pushes his way to the spot he wants on the floor. He is spinning and driving baseline with quick moves, something he just could not do last series.

A few times — like his second basket in game one or the late game-winning layup that same game — he comes hard off the pick to find no defense there and he has driven for a virtually uncontested layup. Blame the Jazz defense if you want (and you should) but Kobe did not do that last series because he lacked the speed to attack the same way.

Last series, Kobe slid around the picks, he glided. Given space he would take his jumpers (and he still hit them with regularity from the spots he likes, such as the elbow), but he could not create the space. He was slower.

But against the Jazz the Kobe that pushes and spins his way to those spots, then explodes for the jumper, is back. He has taken advantage when the Jazz got stuck with a smaller man on him (Deron Williams, for example). Kobe is backing guys down again. The elevation is back.

Kobe is still shooting a lot of jumpers — he is not 25-year-old Kobe with that raw athleticism that make him impossible to matchup. He picks his spots now. His game has matured.

But he is getting the shots he wants again. And that makes him a very, very dangerous player.

Just want the Jazz needed. Another nearly unstoppable problem.

Derek Fisher was not in fight in an Oklahoma City Waffle House, but he was in a Waffle House

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nba_fisher_250.jpgWhen an Oklahoma City radio station started reporting that the Lakers Derek Fisher had been involved in a fight at a Waffle House in Oklahoma City, pretty much everyone around the Lakers said, “Fisher? In a fight? We’re not buying that.”

Say what you will about Fisher’s game — and Lakers fans have — nobody questions his character. Guy is a rock in the locker room. President of the Players Association. Four rings. Calm under pressure. And not a fighter. Oh, sure, the guy setting a pick on him may get the odd “inadvertent” elbow to the gut, but that’s different than a fight in a restaurant.

Turns out, Fisher likes waffles (who doesn’t?), was in a Waffle House in Oklahoma City a year ago and a fight broke out. But he was not involved, he told the Orange County Register.

These reports are false. I was not involved in an altercation and would have hoped that the media would check their sources and facts before reporting or insinuating that I was in any way violent.

“To be clear, over a year ago, I was a witness to an altercation at a Waffle House in Oklahoma City after a regular season game. The police were called after a fight broke out between two patrons. I reported what I had seen, was thanked by the police for my assistance and returned to my hotel.

“I was an innocent bystander and simply assisted police that evening.”

Lakers fans just read that and started making jokes about him being an innocent bystander as Russell Westbrook blows past him. That’s fair game, but the Fighting Fisher jokes are over.