Tag: Lakers Suns Game 3

NBA Playoffs, Lakers Suns: Channing Frye gives advice to basketball scribes

1 Comment

cfrye.jpgOf all the words spent discussing, analyzing, explaining, and picking apart Lakers-Suns, a good number of them have concerned Channing Frye. The Suns’ bench on the whole has had their moments, but Frye is the one reserve that has yet to really contribute with his most valuable skill: shooting. Channing has made just one of his 20 shot attempts in this series, and has averaged just 1.3 points in 15.4 minutes per game.

So naturally, after seeing how much of a positive influence Frye’s three-point shooting can be on the Suns’ offense in the regular season and the two prior playoff series, fans and writers have been a bit critical of Channing’s performance over the last three games. It’s hard to shield him from any of it; 1-for-20 is impressively awful, especially considering the Lakers’ blatant disregard of the “threat” of Frye’s shooting on the pick-and-roll. It’s gotten to the point where L.A.’s defenders often give Channing plenty of room to fire, and he still can’t connect.

Apparently, Channing has had enough of it. Here’s a quote from Frye via Ken Berger of CBS Sports:

“You know what guys, to be honest I’m kind of disappointed,” Frye
said. “First you said we couldn’t beat them and now you’re talking
about a lot of negativity. I think we need to look at how well Robin
[Lopez] is playing, how well Amar’e [Stoudemire] is playing. My baskets
– yeah, they would’ve helped. Yeah, I haven’t been shooting very well.
But I feel like I’m doing other things better, helping out defensively
and getting as many boards as I can. So for you guys to talk about me
shooting, that’s kind of – there’s better stories to write about than
me shooting.”

Berger’s response was the perfect one: “With all due respect, that’s for me to decide. Your job is to make shots.” Zing!

Frye clearly underestimates the consumption rate of available NBA content in print and online, especially during the NBA playoffs. Of course people are writing on Amar’e’s huge Game 3 performance or Robin Lopez’s fantastic play. Those angles are covered, covered, and covered again. That may provide an interesting morsel, but it doesn’t give the whole story of Game 3 or any other, and that’s where Frye comes in.

Every player making a significant impact on the game deserves this kind of treatment, and throwing up 19 errant shots out of 20 certainly qualifies. His justifications also come off as a bit defensive, especially when considering that his rebounding really hasn’t been above average and his defense far from notable. I’m sure Frye is trying to make his mark on this series, he’s just not doing it. That’s the story.

This isn’t an issue of effort, but one of execution. A hot shooter has gone deathly cold, and Phoenix’s number of productive bench players has dropped from five to four. 

You're going to need more than a broken nose to stop Steve Nash


Nash_Nose.jpgSteve Nash has a broken nose.

Officially, he has “a minimally displaced nasal fracture with displaced cartilage,” as Yahoo’s Mark Spears tweeted. That is still a fancy way of saying he has a broken nose.

He will have to have a minor procedure to correct it, but he is not going to miss any game time.

Nash was in a pretty light mood after the game when talking about it.

I don’t think I broke it, I think I rearranged it,” Nash said in a televised interview on NBATV.com.

The injury happened when Derek Fisher inadvertently hit Nash in the nose with his head while reaching in to steal the ball late in the game. Fisher was called for a foul on the play.

NBA Playoffs Lakers Suns: Phil Jackson is thinking about sitting Andrew Bynum, but it won't help


Bynum_Lopez.jpgUPDATE 2:06 pm: Both Andrew Bynum and Phil Jackson said after Lakers practice on Monday that Bynum will play and start in Game 4.

Again, not a shock. Bynum’s knee is not getting better or worse by playing, it’s a matter of pain management. A game or two off is not going to help him.

9:31 pm. Andrew Bynum has a torn meniscus in his right knee, a little bit of cartilage that is becoming a big problem for the Lakers.

It is clearly bothering him. Bynum is not playing well — in Game 3 he had one nice post move to go with the fouls he picked up so quickly all game. On a night Amare Stoudemire was aggressive and attacking the basket, the Lakers needed Bynum’s length to protect the rim.

And he sat with a sore knee and foul trouble.

Maybe sitting him out more and giving him some rest would help. When asked after the game Lakers coach Phil Jackson said he had thought about it, and that he would talk to Bynum about it between games.

Bynum said he was not sitting out.

The problem is, rest is not going to make it better, knee surgery is. Minor knee surgery, but surgery nonetheless. The Lakers need Bynum — not as much in this series but in the next one against the Celtics, if they make it. Bynum has not developed a reputation as a quick healer, surgery would mean the end of his season. Bynum doesn’t want that.

But rest is not helping. The candid Bynum — maybe the most open of the Lakers players — said after the Lakers had a week off leading up to the Suns series that his knee felt worse, not better. Rest has not done it any good before. There were three days off between games two and three in the Suns series and he looked worse. Rest is not the answer.

Bynum is better — even when healthy — when he can use is 7’0″, 285-pound frame to bang. The mobility and quickness of the Suns can expose his defensive rotations on the best of days.

Sunday night, Bynum was in foul trouble because he was late on rotations (and because Amare Stoudemire was the aggressor). He was late in part because his knee is very sore and he moves more slowly. It’s a problem.

But it’s not a problem more rest solves.