Tag: Lakers Celtics

Quote of the Day: Big Baby's motivation speech


Thumbnail image for Davis_drool.jpg“We went through too many ups and downs to lose like this,” Davis said. “Out of all the teams in the league we were the one that struggled. We were the one that went through the bumps and bruises. We went through the, ‘we’re old.’ We went through the ‘oh, they can’t play, they’re going to get beat by Cleveland, get beat by Orlando.’ We’re here now, in spite of what everyone else thinks.

“So you think we’re just going to let this go? No. We accept the challenge to win the championship. We want it. It’s that point blank simple. We could have gave up a long time ago. We could have gave up a long time ago and looked forward to next year. But no, we’re here. So we’re going to take it while we are here. We understand we’ve been through the ups and down and deserve it more than them.”

–Glen “Big Baby” Davis, on why the Celtics will step up in Game 7.

NBA finals Lakers Celtics Game 6: Lakers bench arrives just in time


Something about home cooking. Does the bench body good.

There’s been a high level of complexity to the results of the NBA finals thus far. Everything from the Lakers’ ball movement to the Celtics rebounding have influenced the outcome. But a consistent factor in deciding these games has been the output of the respective benches. And in Game 6, along with their starting counterparts, the Lakers’ bench finally showed up.

In the Lakers’ three losses in this series, their bench has scored just 37 points. In their three wins? 62. And 25 of those points came in Game 6. Lamar Odom is the real fifth starter for the Lakers, but tonight Sash Vujacic (Machine!)’s 9 points, to go with Jordan Farmar and Shannon Brown’s understated 8 points combined were a huge difference.

LA outscored the Celtics 25-13 in bench points, and still held a 17-13  advantage without Odom. That Odom decided to actually make an impact (though only scoring 8 points) was just a bonus.

Farmar and Brown, when motivated as they often are by a home crowd, provide defensive intensity and transition buckets. Perhaps nothing so encapsulated the Lakers’ night than Farmar’s diving recovery of a loose ball, feeding Bryant for a transition drive that led to a foul. It was a perfect example of the kind of play that the bench failed to make in Boston and that the Lakers desperately needed in Game 6.

The Celtics’ bench is all primary bigs outside of Nate Robinson, but with the three headed monster of Farmar, Brown, and veteran’s veteran Derek Fisher, the Lakers overwhelmed Rajon Rondo, who had another absolutely horrific game.

Maybe it’s the roar of the celebrity crowd, maybe it’s the sunny weather, maybe it’s just the realization that they were needed tonight (along with an entire team effort that swarmed the Celtics).  But whatever the reason, the Lakers’ bench stepped up tonight, and that’s part of the reason they get another game to make their final statement as to their importance on this top-loaded Lakers squad. If they play like they did tonight, they’ll have another ring as role players on a star studded team.

NBA finals, Lakers Celtics: Who is the MVP?


Thumbnail image for bryant_game2.pngUsually five games into an NBA finals, we have a pretty good idea who is going to get the finals MVP award.

This finals? Good luck. You’d have an easier time naming all 11 starters on the Slovenian national soccer team.

Really, the only consistently good player on both sides has been Kobe Bryant. The guy who tried to carry the Lakers to victory in Game 5 by himself during the third quarter. Win or lose, Kobe has been there, scoring 29 points or more in four of the five games. It has not always been efficient scoring, but he has been the one player who has attacked in each and every game.

The last guy to win Finals MVP on the losing team? Jerry West in the 1969 finals, when the Lakers lost in seven games to the Celtics at the old Great Western Forum. That was a group of more talented Lakers losing out to a better team in the Celtics.

For the Celtics, who do you pick?

Rajon Rondo has been the leader of their offense in terms of setting up, and he took over the second half of Game 4. Kevin Garnett has had two good offensive games and again remains key to the Celtics defense that has them ahead. Paul Pierce has had a couple good games now, but was missing the first half of the series. Ray Allen had a record setting night and a horrific night. Big Baby?

Maybe the referees for their influence on games?

The winner of the award may well be the guy that takes over Game 7. (Because you just have a feeling with these teams it is going to get there.) But if the vote were conducted now, we might need the Electoral College to come in because there would be know clear winner.

NBA finals Celtics Lakers Game 5: Blogbook will not be sitting next to Kobe on the ride home

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celticscelebrate.jpgA collection of thoughts on Lakers-Celtics Game 5:

  • Ron Artest and Derek Fisher were a combined 4-18.

  • Let’s just let that one sit for a minute.

  • And what’s even more stunning, Artest my have actually played worse than his shooting line indicates. At one point, he pulled off another rajoncrowd.jpgI made the comment during the game that Rondo in this game was like Marty McFly during “Johnny Be Good“. He’s trying just to bring the intensity but ends up looking a little foolish. Of particular note was the play where he attempted to go behind the back on a baseline dribble, only to find, well, the baseline. Many of his transition passes were a little too flashy and his teammates couldn’t get a handle on it because he was too many steps ahead of them. His seven turnovers were painful, but it was a much better result than the hesitant, invisible Rondo that’s appeared at times in this series.

  • Lamar Odom just… wasn’t.. there. You know? Another of those games, the kind he’s had for the majority of the series, and all this with Glen Davis checking him for a significant portion of the time. The Lakers so desperately need wing help, Jackson has turned to Luke Walton twice in this series, once to a fantastic result (Game 3), and one to a terrible turnover that benched him for the rest of the contest.

  • This thing is lightyears from being over. The Lakers, if they ever decide to pull their head out, can use their length and talent to execute their offense, their whole offense, which can overcome the Celtics’ phenomenal defense. But more importantly, they’ll have to get back to the defensive principles that got them to the Finals. And that means protecting the rim.

  • The Lakers have come back from adversity consistently this postseason, but haven’t faced an elimination game this year. It’s time to find out what kind of team they are.

NBA finals Lakers Celtics Game 5: Kobe Bryant hit lightspeed and left the Lakers behind


bryantsad.jpgKobe Bryant’s third quarter was transcendent. It was simply brilliant individual basketball. He nailed a series of shots that literally, only he can make. He was incredible in turning low percentage shots into conversions time and time again. One handed runners falling out of bounds? Terrific. A near 28 foot three? Money. It was as fine an individual shooting performance as you will ever see in the NBA.

And it sunk his team.

After a series of manageable possessions kept the Boston lead to six at the half, the Celtics picked up where they left off. All five Celtics’ starters had buckets within the first four minutes, distributing the ball and creating easy looks against a suddenly apoplectic Lakers’ defense.

And the Lakers’ offense? It went into “Watch-Kobe” mode. And stayed there.

Beyond Bryant’s 7-9 shooting, here’s the entirety of the Lakers’ offense in the 3rd..

During the first six minutes of the game, as Kobe unleashed the barrage:

11:19 Kevin Garnett blocks Pau Gasol layup

After Kobe cooled to reload:

4:54 Kevin Garnett blocks Pau Gasol lauyup
2:49 Derek Fisher misses 21-foot jumper
2:15 Pau Gasol makes driving layup
1:25 Tony Allen blocks Pau Gasol layup (are you sensing a theme here?)
:53 Rajon Rondo blocks Jordan Farmar layup
:44 Sasha Vujacic makes 22-foot jumper
:04 Lamar Odom misses 3-foot jumper
:01 Pau Gasol makes layup

That’s 3 of 9 for the quarter for every player outside of #24. So during Kobe’s run, the Lakers had exactly one field goal from non-Kobe personnel, and that was before Bryant really started (his first field goal in the 3rd was at the 10:42 mark). Afterwards, 3 of 8 from the floor and they never really recovered from that. Non-Kobe personnel went 5-11 in the 4th quarter, a much better mark but not nearly good enough to overcome the Celtics’ offensive juggernaut (with the way the Lakers were playing defense especially).

There’s reasonable job (if it weren’t for the blown free throws), but the damage was already done and the Lakers’ offense never really hit its stride.

There’s precedent for this. In 2006, Kobe went ballistic on the Suns, only to find himself outgunned. Then, just like now, people blamed his teammates for not being good enough to get Bryant’s glowing performance to the promised land. But we know this Lakers team is good enough to win a title. See: 2009. But that version of Bryant was facilitating, rebounding, getting his teammates involved, working in the flow of the offense.

Tonight, instead, Bryant opted for ISO sets and reaction jumpers, taking any opening, or really, any opportunity, even if guarded. The catch and shoot three? A last second desperation after Ron Artest Crazy Pills’d his way around the perimeter and through the lane for 12 seconds.

So are we to blame Bryant for this? For submarining the Lakers’ offense and dropping them into an inefficient ditch, left for dead?

Of course not.

Kobe did what he does best. Score. Played with passion and pride. And had the Lakers set created open looks for other players, he likely would have given them the opportunity to succeed. But at the same time, Bryant’s teammates will get undue criticism. They ran the plays as asked, functioned as performed.

But Phil Jackson? Phil Jackson had a hand in this. At no point did he stop to ask “Hey, I have a highly inconsistent team that tends to fade considerably when not involved. Maybe I should get Bryant to start facilitating and not just gunning, to spread the bullets out a little bit, you think?” He instead just let the team go into “Watch Kobe” mode and suffered the consequences. The defensive lapses can be pinned on effort and awareness. Pau Gasol getting punked like a ballerina in rollerball can be pinned on the big guy.

But letting the Laker offense, which has such potential, go down the tubes behind a flash of Kobe’s brilliance that was sure to let up eventually against the Boston defense (and with Bryant considerably older than he was when he was dropping 81)? That’s on coaching, and another in a long line of adjustments Phil Jackson has failed to make in this series.

Oh, and by the way. Not to say we told you so… but we told you so. (We totally meant to tell you so.)