Tag: Lakers Celtics

NBA finals: Lakers will parade the streets as champions on Monday


greatfans.jpgThe Lakers have announced their parade info. It’s time to party with the champions. Again. For the sixteenth time in NBA history. Seventeenth overall.

You’d think they’d get tired of it. These parades come as regularly as the St. Patty’s Day one in Boston.

But no, of course, nothing beats a title and the Laker fans will love every minute of it. It is time to party and they will party hard.

The Lakers’ Championship Parade is set for Monday. Here’s the full release from NBA.com:

The Los Angeles Lakers will host a celebratory parade for all local
fans on Monday, June 21, starting at STAPLES Center and traveling south
on Figueroa Street to Jefferson Boulevard, just north of the USC campus
and Galen Center.

By defeating the Boston Celtics for the 2010 NBA championship, the
Lakers not only earned the franchise’s 16th league title but also
repeated as champions for the third time in the past decade. The Lakers
have won back-to-back titles a total of seven times in franchise
history, tying the NBA mark previously held by the Celtics. Tonight’s
victory marks only the fourth of the Lakers’ 16 NBA titles that went to a
deciding seventh game, and the first time besting the Celtics in a
seventh game.

Based on attendance for the 2002 NBA championship parade and last
season’s festivities, team and City officials anticipate a crowd of
between 500,000 and 2 million fans lining the two-mile parade route
along South Figueroa Street.

While the City of Los Angeles and hometown Lakers held an
accompanying rally attended by more than 95,000 inside the Coliseum to
mark the 2009 championship, this time around, players will interact with
fans from a customized flat-bed float, equipped with audio
capabilities. That will help to mitigate anticipated pedestrian and
traffic congestion, while also relieving security, sanitation and other
civic demands otherwise required of the privately funded 2010

Beginning at approximately 11 a.m. (PDT), Lakers players and their
families will board the customized float at STAPLES Center, and begin
winding their way down South Figueroa Street toward the USC campus
before turning east on Jefferson Boulevard at the Galen Center to
complete the parade. A convoy of double-decker, open-air buses and other
attending vehicles will carry Lakers coaches and staff, members of the
Buss family ownership group, team officials, and the Laker Girls to the
conclusion of the two-mile route.

City officials recommend that, whenever possible, fans take the Metro
Rail system to the Pico/Chick Hearn station adjacent to the parade
route rather than attempt to drive into the STAPLES Center and Figueroa
area. Parking will be available in the downtown lots surrounding STAPLES
Center and the Figueroa corridor, yet street closures beginning the
night before are likely to make morning traffic far more difficult.

The City anticipates closing Figueroa Street between Olympic
Boulevard to the north and Jefferson Boulevard on the south beginning at
midnight Sunday. Other road closures include Chick Hearn Court between
Figueroa Street and Cherry Street; Cherry Street between Olympic and
Pico Boulevards; Flower Street between Washington and Jefferson
Boulevards; Jefferson Boulevard between Figueroa and Hoover Streets; and
all intersections along the two-mile route as designated by the Los
Angeles Police Department and Department of Transportation. LAPD and DOT
anticipate reopening major intersections along Figueroa Street as the
parade commences, pending pedestrians in those areas having dispersed
and other safety conditions being met.

It’s not know at this time if people will still be setting things on fire and dragging people out of their cars. Hopefully not. You know, Mondays are rough as it is.

NBA finals, Lakers Celtics Game 7: Captain Obvious is reporting that Boston missed Kendrick Perkins


perkins_game7.pngIt’s not all that difficult to figure out how the Lakers won the NBA title while shooting an impressively awful 32.5% from the field. With the Laker bigs as active as ever on the offensive glass, L.A. managed 12 more field goal attempts and 20 more free throw attempts than the Celtics. Those are free possessions conjured by effort and size alone, and even if the possessions gained were used somewhat haphazardly, that’s still an outrageous amount of extra opportunities. Even if most were misses (and that they were), the few hits were enough for volume to win out.

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out the impact of Kendrick Perkins’ absence. Perk trailed only Kevin Garnett among the Celtics in defensive rebounding percentage this season (and by a slim margin at that; KG grabbed the defensive board 24.8% of the time while on the floor, and Perk got the rebound 24.4% of the time), and his size and rebounding abilities are even more important against a team like L.A.

It’s not quite as simple as pointing to Rasheed Wallace and Glen Davis, either. They combined for 17 rebounds in a low-possession game, which is frankly even better than should be expected. The problem big for the Celtics turned out to Kevin Garnett, who not only failed to grab more than three boards of his own, but was clearly incapable of preventing Pau Gasol from grabbing offensive rebounds at will. The Spaniard finished the nine offensive boards without Garnett boxing him out properly or Perkins to clean up the mess, which is a bit of a problem.

Maybe Gasol still would have been a prolific offensive rebounder with Perkins on the court. After all, it’s not like Perk’s mere presence would make Garnett a better rebounder. Still, it’s tough to shake the feeling that Boston having another big body on the floor would make some kind of difference. If not one less offensive rebound of Gasol, then maybe one less for Andrew Bynum, Lamar Odom, or Ron Artest.

I don’t know, but one of those offensive rebounds — and especially one of the put-backs that followed — might have had an impact on the game. Y’know, considering the final stages of the fourth quarter teetered between a one-possession game and a two-possession game. Or that Boston was forced to take desperation threes and intentionally foul down the stretch. This was a tight enough game that every little bit counted. Even if Perkins wasn’t going to put up 20 and 10, he could at least be expected to do that much.

NBA Finals Lakers Celtics Game 7: "Crazy Pills" Ron Artest validates loonies everywhere with championship performance


artestwins.jpgIn his uniform, with confetti raining down upon him in his first moments as an NBA championship, Ron Artest thanked his therapist. 

Of course he did. 
The man known as ‘Crazy Pills’ became something more in Game 7 of the NBA Finals, knocking down clutch shot after clutch shot, playing within himself, and finally obtaining the redemption he’d set out to obtain, just by playing basketball. 
All season long, Artest spoke of how much he wanted to please his teammates. It was visible. After his game winning tip in Game 5 of the Lakers series versus the Phoenix Suns, he immediately leapt into Kobe’s arms. He wanted to fit in. He wanted to be accepted. He wanted to be loved. 
This for a man that sunk the Pacers with his reckless behavior and selfishness, from the guy who shot the Kings into the tank, and who pulled the rug out from under the Rockets by overshooting when they needed him most. And he had decided to commit himself fully to the Lakers, to bring a championship to LA (again). He came to Kobe in the shower after the 2008 series and offered his services (while under contract with another team, I might add). He always knew it was LA that would give him his redemption. 
Artest had his moments of goathood in this series. Famously, the Yakety Sax game was a low point. But in a game where Kobe Bryant shot 6 of 24 from the field and the Lakers’ offense looked like roadkill for three quarters of the game, it was Artest who routinely and solidly came through. At one point, Artest nabbed a key offensive rebound, centered, and nailed the putback over the defender’s arms. Then with the game in question after a huge Rajon Rondo three to cut the lead to three, Artest responded with a three of his own, blowing the roof off the Staples Center (figuratively; the Lakers fans would try and do it literally later). 
Artest changed everything about his career tonight. He went from the rogue lunatic who could sabotage his teammates just as quickly as he could lock down on his assignment, to the lovable loon, holding a “Wheaties” box in the presser and going to the club in his jersey. A championship redefines your career, and this one will do the work for Artest. His eccentric personality and quirks will seem like the bizarre textures of a quirky but brilliant championship player, rather than the proof that some players are too “out there” to succeed. He’s also validated the idea that if you’re on the fringe of the NBA and want to win a championship, head to LA. 
Artest’s defensive work, combined with his championship ring, and notoriety, may be enough to eventually land him in the hall, especially if he can help the Lakers back next season. Even if he doesn’t make it there, he’ll have his share of NBA lore complete with brilliant post-game press conference (which we’ll bring you notes of later; just know it was something to behold). 
Artest’s transformation is complete, from the Man That Started the Malice to the Kook Who Spoiled the Truth. Ron Artest’s crazy ride continues. 

NBA finals remain highest rated since Shaq and Kobe tolerated each other

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Laker_Celtics_logos.pngAmerica loves it some Lakers and Celtics.

Of course, America also loves Dancing With The Stars and McDonald’s, so maybe we shouldn’t really trust the collective tastes of our nation. Still, these finals have been well watched.

As we have been telling you throughout the finals, television ratings are up. According to ABC, the Lakers/Celtics games have averaged 16.1 million viewers and a 9.6 rating — the highest ratings since 2004. You remember, back when team basketball trumped the Lakers stars.

Finals’ viewership is up 13 percent compared to last year. So apparently you don’t love Orlando that much. Or you love Ron Artest a whole lot… okay, probably not that. We’ll go with you like traditional matchups.

You can bet the Lakers won't hang balloons in the rafters like they did in 1969

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1969_celtics.jpgSee if this sounds familiar:

The Lakers are the glamour team, the team with the huge stars in the prime of their career. The Lakers have steamrolled the West on their way to the finals and were the betting favorites. The Celtics have some name players too, but they were injured and generally considered too old by the pundits. They had finished fourth in the East, then surprised everyone in the playoffs. It all came down to one game for the NBA title — a Game 7 in Los Angeles.

Sound like 2010? Try 1969.

The year men first walked on the moon. The year of Woodstock — the real, first Woodstock with Jimi Hendrix, not some 90s ripoff that would let Sheryl Crow play. The year the Beatles played their last public concert. When long hair and anti-war protests were the rage. When gas was 35¢ a gallon.  Even then it was still Lakers and Celtics.

The Lakers had three of the game’s all-time greats on the roster: Jerry West, Wilt Chamberlain Elgin Baylor. The Celtics had stars like Bill Russell — who was the player coach — and Sam Jones, but they were both injured.

It had been one great finals just to get to a Game 7. West went off for 53 in Game 1, John Havlicek answered with 43 in Game 2. The whole series had been like that, punches and counter punches.

It all came down to a Game 7 at the Fabulous Forum. No home team had ever lost a Game 7 in NBA finals history, which meant Lakers owner Jack Kent Cooke was feeling cocky. He thousands of balloons put in the rafters to fall when the game was over, and he had choreographed what the band would play.

What he did was motivate the Celtics, who were angered by the balloons. (Not as angry as West, who was livid.) In his great book “Jerry West: The Live and Legend of a Basketball Icon,” Roland Lazenby has this quote from Bill Russell on the game:

I was the coach and I said to my players, “It may be a better show to watch them take those balloons down one at a time.”

Boston came out hot, hitting 8 of their first 10 shots. The Lakers got it close, even tied it in the third quarter, but on this night they had no answer for Jones. West had tweaked hamstring and while he could still shoot — he had 42 points — but Jones was hot and had 24 of his own.

So was Russell, who was attacking Chamberlain and got him in foul trouble. Wilt had five fouls then tweaked his knee with 5:45 left in the game. Chamberlain asked out to rest it. With three minutes left, Chamberlain leans down to coach Butch van Breda Kolff and asked to go back in. Coach says, “We’re doing well enough without you” and leaves him on the bench. Really smart.

It’s a one-point game with little more than a minute left. Jerry West knocked a ball loose but it bounces to Don Nelson — yes, that Don Nelson — who is standing near the free throw line and he throws up a rushed shot from the free throw line that hits the rim, bounces straight up to about the top of the backboard then falls right back through the basket.

That ended up being the winning shot.

The Celtics celebrated winning a title on the Lakers home floor. It was the Celtics 11th title in 13 years. It was also the last one for that dynasty. Jerry West was named MVP in a losing cause.

We’ll see if history repeats itself Thursday.