Tag: Kwame Brown

Alex Len, Tahjere McCall, T.J. Cline, Antoine Mason

Maryland’s Alex Len could be the No. 1 pick. Why is that?


Alex Len put up nice but not thrilling stats at Maryland last season — 11.9 points a game on 53.4 percent shooting, with 7.8 rebounds a game. He’s seen as talented but raw. After the season he had surgery on a stress fracture in his ankle, and there are concerns his health issues could be chronic.

So why are we talking about this guy as a potential No. 1 overall pick?

Why is this the guy that the Thunder and reportedly others want to trade up into the top five to get?

Because he’s a big man with potential.

Of course, so were Michael Olowokandi and Kwame Brown, but at this time of year general managers get seduced with potential — and Len certainly has that. In a draft with no franchise changing, lock No. 1 pick teams have been drawn to the potential of Len. The upside, if you like your cliché draft words.

There’s no question the Ukrainian born Len — at 7’0”, 255 pounds — has NBA big man size. Plus this guy has all the physical tools you want in a center — he moves well, has soft hands, has shown good touch around the rim, can pass, can blocks shots, and he rebounds.

At least, that’s what the team that drafts him will say, but the reality is a little different — Len is raw offensively. There’s a lot of potential, but a lot of questions. Questions such as why other reasonably-sized big men could push him out of the post in college.

Len is hot in part because we haven’t really seen what he can do, and therefore haven’t picked apart his strengths and weaknesses to the same degree as others.

It was hard to get a read from his days at Maryland how good he was because guards couldn’t get him the ball (the Terrapins’ floor spacing was terrible). If you thought you could get a good read on him at the NBA Draft Combine or private workouts, guess again. The ankle surgery did that in. So teams are searching for better information about Len.

When an NBA team drafts a guy it’s not what he can do for them this coming season that matters, it’s what he can do three years down the line. Five years down the line. Some GMs think Len could be better than Noel three years from now. So they are willing to roll the dice on him more than anyone else is this draft.

Opinions around the league vary on Len — some teams love him, some want nothing to do with him. But all it takes is one GM near the top of the draft to put a lot of pressure on Len and pick him near the top. And on that GM takes on the pressure too for taking the risk.

But if it’s not No. 1 it is top six for sure. Len is going to go high up.

Ten prospects NBA fans should watch in NCAA Tournament

WCC Basketball Tournament - Championship Saint Mary's v Gonzaga

We fans place a lot more weight in evaluating players on what they do in the NCAA Tournament than do NBA teams scouting the draft. They have already watched the tape on every game the guy has played this season and likely been to some practices. Then later they will measure him at the combine and likely see him in private workouts.

But the Tournament is a piece in that puzzle, and for some players a bigger piece than others. Here is a quick look at 10 guys for whom how they play this weekend (and they hope the next couple) could play a part in their draft status. (If you’re trying to scout the NCAA Tournament, our sister site CollegeBasketballTalk has a lot of great content, such as the tournament’s best big men and guards to watch out for).

Also, it’s a list of guys NBA fans (particularly if you root for a lottery team) may want to get to know.

Kelly Olynyk, 7’0” center, Gonzaga. He’s more than just that guy with long hair — he has size, moves well and has a really good scoring touch. In a league that values efficient scorers, Olynk is that (he shot 65 percent this season). But coming out of a small conference there are questions about how he deals with the size and athleticism he will see in the NBA. The Tournament will start to be a test of that. He’s a late lottery pick right now, but that could rise or fall depending on how he does in big matchups.

Ben McLemore, 6’4” shooting guard, Kansas. Fans need to familiarize themselves with him — he is going to be a top 3 pick. Going No. 1 is possible. He’s athletic and has a silky-smooth shot that has led some to use a Ray Allen comparison. That’s a little steep for my taste, but he’s a late bloomer and a guy you can say the most overused of draft buzzword about — upside — and be right. But because he isn’t great at creating his own shot McLemore has disappeared in some big games and at the end of other key games. Do that in the tournament and he doesn’t help his cause.

Anthony Bennett, 6’7” power forward, UNLV. Guys coming out of smaller conferences always get watched closely in the tournament to see how they do against the bigger and better players that they are likely to face. Bennett is a beast in the paint, a big physical frame who has thrown down some of the best dunks of the college season. He’s shown flashes of an outside shot and handles, but can he do that consistently? Against better talent? He’s already a top 10 pick and can help his cause.

Shabazz Muhammad, 6’6” shooting guard, UCLA. A year ago he was the guy battling Nerlens Noel for the top spot in the draft on projected boards. Now he has fallen back — not out of the top 10, maybe not even the top 5, but he’s seen more as a role player than a guy who can be a franchise cornerstone. He’s athletic and strong, he can score and defend, and his effort isn’t in question. But he doesn’t use his right hand well and doesn’t create off the dribble well. He has a lot of questions to answer for teams and the tournament needs to be the start of it or he could slip down draft boards.

Patric Young, 6’9” center, Florida. He was highly recruited coming out of high school, but he’s been up and down (at best) in college. He passes the eye test, he looks like a powerful NBA inside player, but Kwame Brown passes the eye test, too. Young just disappears for games, he’s very inconsistent. He’s a late first, early second round pick in this draft, a big tournament could help him get the guaranteed money of the first round rather than the make-good contract of a second rounder.

Mike Muscala, 6’11” center, Bucknell. He’s a senior who has developed into a good inside/outside scorer that is the focus of the Bison offense. He’s got a lot of polish on his game, like you expect from a senior. But coming out of the Patriot League, what can he do against bigger, more athletic NBA players? Right now he’s considered an early second round pick. A good tournament and good workouts and he can move up.

Jamaal Franklin, 6’5” shooting guard, San Diego State. He isn’t just a guy who can dunk. Although he does that quite well. He’s an athletic high-flier that is the kind of guy who can shoot up draft boards with a few good games against quality competition. Particularly games where he shows a stead jump shot, because if he had that he wouldn’t be a late first round pick. He’s be much, much higher.

C.J. Leslie, 6’9” forward, North Caronia State. He’s long, athletic, quick, the kind of tools teams look for in a modern forward. He’s also very inconsistent (much like the Wolfpack). If he can string together some big games on the big stage it can raise his stock, but he is a lottery-level talent who will not be taken there.

James Michael McAdoo, 6’9” power forward, North Carolina. He was a projected high lottery pick early on who has fallen to the middle of the first round with his inconsistently. It’s not just that he’s had to play center in the Tar Heel’s small ball lineups, he needs a more consistent perimeter shot at the next level. He needs to show he can score and facing two good defensive teams (Villanova and Kansas) would be a good test.

Gorgui Dieng, 6’11” center, Louisville. He’s a raw offensive player who at 23 is older for the NBA draft. Those things usually make you a second round pick, at best. But Dieng has been the defensive anchor for a top-seed Cardinals and that has pushed him into the bottom of the first round. He can rebound and is a good passer, just not a shooter. But the defense is selling him — NBA team doesn’t want a guy who can protect the rim and allow them to pressure more on the perimeter? A few good games in the tournament can help cement his first round status.

Is the Lakers biggest problem really Kobe Bryant? No.

Lakers Bryant reacts after hitting a three-point shot against the 76ers during their NBA game in Philadelphia

While Steve Nash and Pau Gasol were out, Kobe Bryant has carried the Lakers. He is leading the league with 29.5 points per game, scoring more points per game than he has since before Pau Gasol arrived as a Laker. Back when Kobe had to carry Kwame Brown and Smush Parker (remember they both started).

But the Lakers have struggled to a 12-14 record — and that is after a three game win streak.

It has led some people to say, “Kobe Bryant is shooting too much.” He is back to being a ball hog and that is what is holding the Lakers back.

I think those people are wrong — Kobe is playing as many minutes but taking fewer shots per game than either of the Lakers most recent title years. With Nash out, the playmaking has to fall to him because you can’t let Chris Duhon do it. But that is different than being an inefficient gunner.

Still you hear it — “Kobe is shooting too much.” And it’s not just fans. This is an assistant coach from another team, speaking to Chris Broussard if ESPN (the story is behind their pay wall).

“Absolutely, Kobe’s shooting too much. When we played them, we told our guys, ‘Look, we don’t necessarily want Kobe going for 50. I mean, we’re going to guard him. But we’re not going to double him, and we’re not going to try to get the ball out of his hands.’ Our main concerns were not to let [Antawn] Jamison hit a bunch of 3s and not to let Dwight [Howard] go crazy down low. There’s no question they would be a better team if Kobe shot less. Why do you think [Pau] Gasol struggles? He’s going to struggle in any offense where he doesn’t touch it.

“[At] the end of the day, it has nothing to do with [Mike] D’Antoni and his system. It’s all about what Kobe will allow to happen. When you play the Lakers, it’s like they don’t have a system. It’s whatever Kobe chooses it to be. If he wants to take all the shots, he’ll do that. He’ll pacify his teammates early in the game, but then he’ll throw up a heat check and if he’s got it going, nobody else touches the ball.

Thing is, who else on that roster (with Nash out) do you want to handle the ball? Darius Morris?

I think this scout hits the nail more on the head.

“Watching the Lakers play the Knicks this year was hard to watch because the other Lakers were just so bad. It was like Kobe was trying to do all he could just to keep that game close. And hey, if Dwight’s not going to try his butt off and if other guys aren’t going to try their butts off, then I’m going to give the ball to the guy that’s going to go for it, and that’s Kobe. I don’t think it’s that Kobe doesn’t trust his teammates; it’s just that he trusts himself more. A questionable shot by him still might be better than a good look for one of those other guys.

That has always been Kobe — he trusts himself to make plays more than he trusts anyone. If other guys are not knocking down shots early he will do it. The only question was always was he hitting shots and efficient or was he a gunner? This season has been his most efficient in a long, long time.

But it is no different than Kobe from any of the Lakers title years, particularly the most recent. He is who he is.

Let’s see what Kobe and the Lakers look like with Steve Nash in the lineup, then we can discuss what needs to change. But through it all, Kobe is not.

Lakers cruise to win over Sixers thanks to an efficient 34 points from Kobe Bryant

Lakers' Bryant shoots between the defense of the 76ers' Turner, Richardson and Brown during their NBA basketball game in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

It’s not often we use the word “efficient” in the same sentence while describing the offensive play of the Lakers’ Kobe Bryant. But in Sunday’s easy 111-98 victory over the Sixers, it was not only appropriate, but it fit the description exactly.

Bryant finished with 34 points on 12-of-21 shooting, to go along with four rebounds and six assists. He opened the game with 11 first-quarter points, while scoring from both inside and out.

Right around 20 shot attempts is probably where Bryant should be on a nightly basis in order for his teammates to remain involved and engaged on both ends of the floor, and with Bryant excelling in this range in this one, there was plenty of offensive opportunity to go around.

Metta World Peace matched Bryant’s first quarter with 11 points of his own, and finished with 19 points and a career-high 16 rebounds.

The Lakers got going offensively early, and did so as a team, with Bryant and World Peace leading the way. It’s been nine games since L.A. has scored at least this many points, so as you might imagine, players who aren’t accustomed to having great performances offensively got going a bit in Philadelphia.

Darius Morris, who remains replaced in the starting lineup by Chris Duhon, had a breakout game with 15 points, all of which were scored in the first half, and 12 of which came in the second period.

He only managed to stay in the game for 18 minutes, with Mike D’Antoni wisely keeping him on a short leash given his propensity to turn the ball over, combined with his inability to consistently initiate the offense. Morris made the most of his opportunity on this night by making his first five shots, but didn’t score after halftime.

Not that the Lakers needed him at that point, anyway.

The team leaned on its stars to get its second straight victory, and beyond Bryant and World Peace, Dwight Howard finished with 17 points on 7-of-13 shooting, 11 rebounds, five assists, three steals, and two blocked shots. He played a pretty complete game, even if Kwame Brown got the better of him on an early offensive possession.

On the Sixers’ side, Nick Young ended up with 30 points in 41 minutes, but got 11 of those by playing the entire fourth quarter in a game that had already been decided. Evan Turner was strong early and his dribble penetration helped keep Philadelphia in it, but when you have the Lakers going 10-of-15 from three-point distance in the first half, there aren’t a lot of answers.

This makes two wins in a row for a Lakers team that is still three games under .500, but hope is on the horizon. L.A. plays next on Tuesday at home against a Bobcats team that has lost 11 straight, and they may have Pau Gasol back in the lineup then, with Steve Nash possibly to follow by the end of the week.

If the offense can continue to improve with a true team effort like this one, the Lakers might be able to begin to climb out of the early-season hole they dug for themselves. But that will only happen if we get the efficient version of Kobe Bryant, the one that so effortlessly helped dismantle the Sixers in Philadelphia, and did so while taking just 21 shots.

Kwame Brown sends Dwight Howard’s shot into the stands (VIDEO)

Kwame Brown

In the matchup at the center position between Kwame Brown and Dwight Howard on Sunday, who would you guess would be the one rejecting the other’s shot by swatting it several rows deep into the stands?

Just as we all suspected, it was Kwame who defended Howard perfectly and got the emphatic block early in the first quarter as the Sixers hosted the Lakers.

As Howard turns and faces, and then immediately goes into a spin move before launching his one-handed shot, you can tell that he’s made this move many times before, and the thought that Brown might stay with him step for step and be right there waiting to contest never even crossed his mind.