Tag: Kwame Brown

Brett Brown, Daniel Orton

Brett Brown: 76ers’ have just six NBA players


Many advanced stats, in basketball and other sports, rely on a concept called a replacement player. A replacement player is a hypothetical player who can easily be obtained to fill out the roster.

In his definition of an NBA replacement player, Kevin Pelton says a team of replacement players would win 10 games in a season. So, that should show the level of a replacement player is pretty low.

Yet, every season, for one reason or another, there are many NBA players who produce at below replacement levels. This season, it seems many of those sub-replacement-level players will be members of the 76ers.

Keith Pompey of The Inquirer:

Michael Carter-Williams, James Anderson, Evan Turner, Thaddeus Young, and Spencer Hawes are the clear starters. The second thing is that power forward/center Lavoy Allen is an experienced NBA player who is finding his way back into shape.

“And after that, who knows?” Sixers coach Brett Brown said before Monday’s 104-93 setback to Cleveland in Columbus, Ohio. “You have six NBA players and then you have a bunch of guys who are fighting for spots and want to be seen and need opportunity.”

The former San Antonio Spurs assistant is not including injured players – rookie Nerlens Noel (torn anterior cruciate ligament) and veterans Jason Richardson (knee), Kwame Brown (hamstring), and Arnett Moultrie (ankle). All have guaranteed contracts and are expected make the 15-man roster.

If I were Darius Morris, Tony Wroten or Daniel Orton, I’d be a little perturbed by that comment.

But only a little.

Though Morris, Wroten and Orton played in the NBA last season, they’re not necessarily NBA players anymore. Vander Blue, Mac Koshwal, Gani Lawal , Hollis Thompson, Royce White , Rodney Williams and Khalif Wyatt all want a spot on the roster, and the Riggin’-for-Wiggins 76ers are just the team to accommodate.

This is a large group of flawed players, and Philadelphia will keep whomever it believes can help most down the road. That’s obviously a difficult judgment to make with players like these, so the small margins can matter a great deal.

Experience alone won’t cut it. Brown is in a rare position to demand a lot from a large share of his roster, because the 76ers have relatively few highly paid players. These 10 players are really going to have to bust their hump to make the roster.

As Brown is all too happy to remind them, they’re not really NBA players yet.

Sixers sign Daniel Orton for rest of training camp


The Philadelphia 76ers are trying to find any kind of big man rotation that might work. And by might work I mean be better than the Kentucky front line, not actually win the Sixers a bunch of games.

We shouldn’t sell the solid Spencer Hawes short, and if he eventually pairs with a healthy Nerlens Noel there is potential, but the rest of bigs in Sixers camp isn’t inspiring: Lavoy Allen, Kwame Brown, Mac Kowshal and Arnett Moultrie.

Now you can add Daneil Orton to the mix — he is in and Tim Ohlbrecht is out, reports CSNPhilly.com. This is not a guaranteed contract; the Sixers can still cut Orton.

Orton, a power forward, was the No. 29 pick in the first round by the Magic, he spent two years in Orlando, they let him go and he spent last year on Oklahoma City’s bench, but was waived again.

We’ll see if he can even make the Sixers roster. He has shown a limited offensive game and hasn’t dome much on defense — he spent a chunk of time (31 games) in the D-League last season, we’ll see if those minutes helped his game at all.

Danny Ainge: Not worth tanking for Andrew Wiggins


Every active No. 1 pick, with the exception of Tim Duncan, who has been in the NBA at least six seasons – Greg Oden, Andrea Bargnani, Andrew Bogut, Dwight Howard, LeBron James, Kwame Brown, Kenyon Martin and Elton Brand –  has changed teams by age 28.

It’s an era where teams must kowtow to top talent or risk losing it.

Danny Ainge apparently doesn’t subscribe to that model, though. Ainge, via Ian Thomsen of Sports Illustrated:

As I walk around town, more than anything else there are those that say, ‘Hey, don’t win too many games,”‘ said Ainge, the Celtics’ president of basketball operations. “There are so many fans that want us to play for the draft.”

Ainge’s measured response is that they should be more careful what they wish for.

Without ever mentioning the name of the consensus No. 1 pick Andrew Wiggins, Ainge made it clear that he does not believe the Kansas freshman carries the value of Kevin Durant, with whom he is often compared.

“If Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was out there to change your franchise forever, or Tim Duncan was going to change your franchise for 15 years? That might be a different story,” said Ainge. “I don’t see that player out there.”

Ainge, even beyond his implicit insult of Wiggins, misses the point on multiple levels.

If the Celtics don’t tank, what’s the alternative? Winning 35 games? That’s still a miserable season, and it ends with minimal chance of landing a top player in the draft. Quite possibly, it means drafting a player who is exactly good enough to keep Boston in the 35-win range.

No team with a reasonable chance of advancing in the playoffs has ever tanked. Teams that know they’ll be bad regardless tank. They figure the difference between being run-of-the-mill bad and truly awful is offset by a higher draft choice, and usually, they’re right.

And tanking isn’t – at least, shouldn’t – be about going after a single player. The team with the worst record has only a 25 percent chance of getting the No. 1 pick, but it is guaranteed a top-four pick, and that’s a major part of the reward. Tanking appears to be more beneficial this season than usual, because there are several high-end prospects who will likely enter this draft: Wiggins, Julius Randle Marcus Smart, Jabari Parker, Andrew Harrison and more. Teams at the top of the draft, even if not holding the top pick, are in line to select a good player.

Obviously, if the Celtics land the No. 1 pick, Ainge would have several years to repair his relationship with Wiggins – if Wiggins even takes offense, which I doubt he would.

Ainge is a competitor who wants to win. Wiggins is a competitor who wants to win. If they’re ever working for the same organization, they can bond over that rather than the circumstances that brought them together.